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Discussion Starter #1
I have recently installed Windows XP as a dual boot on my computer onto a partition with 2GB of space. As the XP literature states that 1.GB is large enough I gave it an extra 0.5GB just to be safe.

The idea was to have this partition solely for the XP OS. All program files and data files are saved on a separate partition.

However, within a few weeks of installing XP my partition seemed to be running out of space and suddenly I kept getting the blue screen. I have no idea what the surplus files were but the end was forced to uninstall XP.

Before I go through the hassle of increasing this partition does anyone have any ideas why this may have occured and whether there is a way to stop XP using up so much space?

The other problem I have is that since uninstalling, and reformating the XP partition, I still get the option on boot up asking whether I want to boot up XP or 98SE. As XP is not installed is there any way to remove this option?

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Andrew
 

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Are you saying you have a dual boot system of XP and 98? How big is your drive? Did you install Windows XP first (like you are suppose to)? Are you giving Windows XP the majority of the drive space, because 2GB is cutting it pretty close.
 

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I did have until I uninstalled XP. I actually installed 98SE first which I had read somewhere was what I needed to do, and was quite happy as it meant that I did not need to uninstall everything, before reinstalling. 98SE was the incumbent OS.

My drive is 20GB, split 2GB for XP OS, 2GB for 98SE OS, 6GB for programs and the rest for data.

If I need to resize the partitions, what is the recommended size for the XP partition, assuming I do not want to save any other programs or data on this partition? I had assumed that increasing the recommended size given by msoft by 1/3 would have been adequate, but then again since when can you trust the manuals http://www.techsupportforum.com/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=378470#
1 Sad Is there an easy way to resize, ie in order to avoid uninstalling everything.

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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I haven't been able to try it yet, but I hear you can download a free trial of BootIT NG with unlimited use of the product for 30 days. You may want to give it a try to resize the partitions. I would give XP at least 3 or 4GB of drive space. You may want to turn off or decrease the amount of space System Restore can use also.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks like I will need to resize the partitions, do you have any useful tips on how to do this relatively painlessly?
 

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Andrew223 said:
The idea was to have this partition solely for the XP OS. All program files and data files are saved on a separate partition.

However, within a few weeks of installing XP my partition seemed to be running out of space and suddenly I kept getting the blue screen. I have no idea what the surplus files were but the end was forced to uninstall XP.
1) Default for recycle bin and IE cache is, by default higher than needed.

2) So is that for System restore, but this takes up more space as more restore points are created.

3) It is not clear if you are installing progs in the 'solely for XP' partition or not. If you are not, some files will still be placed there.
 

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Besides It's WINDOWS and all versions of windows are packrats they save everything, That's why some people do a clean install of windows at least once a year. The last time I did a clean install I started with 16gig on an 80gig after a clean install and everything reinstalled and updated, I Had 12gig on an 80gig, so there was 4gig of trash. :4-dontkno
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This may be a stupid question, but if I do a full reinstall, does that mean that I will need to reinstall all programs as well?

When you clean install, do you reformat the partition that the OS was on before reinstalling?

Thanks
 

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Andrew223 said:
This may be a stupid question, but if I do a full reinstall, does that mean that I will need to reinstall all programs as well?

When you clean install, do you reformat the partition that the OS was on before reinstalling?
A "clean install", as most people like to call it, is basically reformating the partition and then installing Windows on it, as oppose to installing XP over XP.
 

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Andrew223 said:
This may be a stupid question, but if I do a full reinstall, does that mean that I will need to reinstall all programs as well?

When you clean install, do you reformat the partition that the OS was on before reinstalling?

Thanks
Yes starting with the OS and reinstalling everything. A clean install is not an absolute must, There are verious reasons for doing one (bad virus infection, OS get corrupt to the point that you have no choise). I deally just after you have done one, copy (backup) the entire drive to a separate drive and set it aside for the next time. Then you can copy it back and be up and running in no time. :grin: Of course that's Ideally. :4-dontkno
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry for the delay in responding but just been on holiday and did not manage to sort this out before I left.

Ok, I have now resized my partitions so as to give the anticipated XP partition 4 GB ... hopefully that is now ample.

However, I have just tried reinstalling XP on this resized partition and I keep getting set up errors. I have now tried 3 times (reformating the partition after each attempt), but each time during the setup I get a number of messages saying "setup cannot copy the file: xxx". On each attempt the problematic files have been different.

On the last attempt the relevant files were:

msvbvm50.dll
webfldrs.msi
msjet40.dll
p2pgraph.dll
tapisrv.dll
winhttp.dll
zipfldr.dll

On receiving each of these messages, I have the option to either press Enter to try copying again (which does nothing as the error comes back), or pressing Esc to continue anyway and risk XP not working properly, or F3 to abort set up.

On pressing Esc each time (after trying Enter first), I then get to the next stage of Setup but when it tries to boot up XP I simply get the Blue Screen. On the first and third attempts the Blue Screen message that I received was "STOP: c0000221 {Bad Image Checksum}, The image shdocvw.dll (wininet.dll on 3rd attempt) is possibly corrupt. The header checksum does not match the computed checksum."

On the second attempted install the blue screen message that I received was "STOP: c000021a {Fatal System Error}, The windows Logon Process system process terminated unexpectedly with a status of Oxc0000135 (0x00000000 0x00000000) The system has been shut down."

I am sure it is not supposed to be this difficult to install XP, does anyone have any ideas what is going on and how to stop it happening.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Copied from MSKB article 310064:-

You receive a file copy error while the Setup program is running
When you try to install Windows XP, you may receive one of the following error messages:
Setup cannot copy the file file_name. Press X to retry, Y to abort
where file_name is the file that Setup cannot copy, or:
INF File Textsetup.sif is corrupt or missing Status 14 SETUP CANNOT CONTINUE
This behavior may occur if any one of the following conditions is true:
• Your Windows XP CD-ROM is scratched, smudged, or dirty. Clean the Windows XP CD-ROM with a soft cloth, insert it in the CD-ROM drive, and then click OK.
• Your CD-ROM drive is not working correctly or the CD-ROM might be vibrating too much for the laser to accurately read the data. For more information about this problem, see your hardware documentation or contact the CD-ROM manufacturer.
• If you are using multiple CD-ROM drives, your computer may be trying to locate files on the wrong drive. If your hardware has a feature to disable CD-ROM drives that are not being used, disable the CD-ROM drives that you are not using.
• Your computer is over-clocked. Because over-clocking is very memory-intensive, decoding errors may occur when you extract files from your Windows XP CD-ROM.
• Try to use the default clock timings for your motherboard and processor. For more information about how to do this, see your hardware documentation or contact the motherboard manufacturer.
• Your computer has damaged or mismatched random access memory (RAM) or cache memory. For example, you might be using a combination of extended data out (EDO) and non-EDO RAM, or different RAM speeds.

Decoding errors may occur even if Windows appears to be running correctly. These errors occur because of the additional stress that is put on your computer when Windows tries to extract files and to access the hard disk.

To determine how to make your computer cache memory unavailable while you are running the Setup program, see your hardware documentation or contact your hardware manufacturer.
• Ultra direct memory access (DMA) is turned on in your computer's CMOS settings, and the data is moving too quickly.
• Change from DMA mode to Processor Input/Output (PIO) mode to lower your data transfer rate. If this does not resolve the problem, lower your PIO mode settings. The higher your PIO mode settings are, the faster your data transfer is.
• You are using a third-party memory manager.
• There is a virus on your computer.
If you continue to receive this error message, copy the i386 folder from the CD-ROM drive to your local hard disk, and then try to run the Setup program from your hard disk.

Good luck.
 
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