Tech Support banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a broadband Internet connection connected to a D-link four-port router. Two ethernet patch cables run from the router: one to a G4 macintosh, the other to a Linksys five-port workgroup switch. Three cables on the switch run further to two Macs (a G3 and a G4) and an HP Pavilion. A fourth cable runs from the switch to a Linksys "Cable/DSL router with four-port switch," but not to the "Internet" port – I have it connected from one of the switch ports on the switch to a switch port on the router. The router finally connects to another G3 mac and an Apple Laserwriter network printer.

This setup leaves me with two open ethernet ports on the main router (acting as a DHCP server), one of which does not seem to function, as well as one open port on the switch, which is not in use because it disables the uplink port and cuts off all but one of my computers from the Internet. One of the other ports on the switch seems to have stopped working, but I hardly ever use the pavilion, so that's connected there. I have one last open port on the Linksys router, in addition to the unused Internet port. When I have my network set up this way, everything works fine. Every computer (except maybe the Pavilion) can access every other computer, the printer, and the Internet.

A problem seems to arise when I connect my Netgear WG602 v2 access point to the secondary router. Connected to the primary router, it seemed to work fine. When I connect it to the secondary router (the open switch port, not the Internet port), the network continues to function the way it's supposed to – except the printer. The wired computers can see the printer on the network, and when I tell them to print, they say they're doing so... for a long time. It takes about five minutes for the normally quick printing error dialog to appear. I can usually solve this by turning the printer off and on again, but that doesn't always fix it. And even when it does, it only lasts for a little while. I'll take care of my print jobs, but when I come back again, the problem has returned. When I disconnected the access point, printing returned to normal.

Like I said, when the access point is connected to the primary router, this doesn't seem to be an issue. The problem is that the location of that router is not a great place for the access point to be. It's on a different floor, and the signal doesn't reach enough of the house to justify having it at all. The other router is in a better location, though I'll still have to get a new antenna to maximize the signal.

It's been suggested that there may be a maximum number of Ethernet clients for my network and that the access point exceeds that number, but the closest thing I could find by searching Google claimed the limit to be 1024. I don't have nearly that many clients hooked up. I've also heard that maybe since it's a Mac network, the access point, which is PC-oriented, might be having problems, but I've never had OS-related issues with Ethernet before. My wireless computer connects to the network and the Internet through the router, so why can't the network handle a network printer and an access point at the same time?

My computers are running Mac OS X version 10.2.8 for the most part, but I have two (one is the wireless) running 10.3.9. The Pavilion runs Windows 98 SE, but to the best of my knowledge hasn't been turned on in a couple of weeks. The access point has the newest firmware version. I've tried moving cables around, plugging Ethernet devices into different ports on the network devices, switching between switches and routers, and not using any of the ports that I know don't work. Is there any way that I should be able to use my access point connected to the secondary router? Any help is appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Should I assume, because, of the 22 people who've viewed this thread so far, none of them have been able to help yet, that this isn't a problem that many people are familiar with? Is there somewhere else – another forum perhaps, or even another board on this one – where I might be more likely to get a response?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Forgive me if I seem impatient, but I'm trying to get my wireless up and running. I'm very much looking forward to taking advantage of the Internet-based games coming for the Nintendo DS in November. Like I said, I've been able to get my wireless computer to connect to the network and the Internet through my access point, but for some reason, the access point is disabling the printer. The AP has been sitting on a shelf for over a week now, so I've been pretty much limited to using the wired computers. I'd really appreciate some help, or some links to resources, or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've started wondering if there might be a compatibility issue between my Netgear AP and my Linksys/D-Link network. Could it be that another AP, for instance one from Linksys, might not cause this problem? If that's a likely issue, I could conceivably set up the network to have the Internet running into the Netgear AP directly, then create a wireless bridge to the wired network by setting up a Linksys AP as a receiver. The problem with that setup, of course, is still that the wireless is all hooked up in the basement, so there's no signal in any of the "living" areas of the house. However, I might be able to bridge the network with a directional antenna to a more useful location. I guess I'd be willing to try some of these ideas, but I don't want to move on anything that will cost a lot of money without considerable faith that it will work. What are your thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
I am going to chime in here, but this is one confusing post.

Why is your network configured this way and what are you trying to accomplish?? Maybe it is just me, but I am having a hard time understanding what the end goal is here with all this equipment.

I assume you only have 1 interent connection? Connected to the D-Link router? What type of Intenet connection do you have? Cable, DSL, other?

With all the gear you have set up here from my understanding, you should only have DHCP enabled on the D-Link router with the WAN connection. All other equipment should have DHCP disabled (if the device supports DHCP).

Your printer should be assigned a static IP address outside the DHCP range. Each router, switch, wireless access point with a web interface should be assigned a static IP address outside the DHCP range. Do not use an IP address with .255 on the end. All your IP address should be on the same IP subnet and a Subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 should be fine.

Make sure you have no IP address conflicts, add one machine at a time and check the IP address that it gets assigned. Additionally, you may need to force some of you NIC cards to a fixed speed rather than Auto Detect.

I assume the network configuration is a Broadband connection feed to a router, hooking up many machines, a network printer and a wireless access point. This should all be somewhat plain vanilla even with a bunch of different boxes.

My guess is you have a IP address conflict, a IP subnet problem and more than 1 DHCP session enabled.

JamesO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I have seven computers altogether. There are nine people living in my house, and all of us are pretty extensive computer users. In adition to the seven computers, there is one network printer, the one that I'm having the problem with. I'm using Verizon FIOS, which comes directly into the house. The closest thing I have to a modem is a box on the wall that regulates the Internet and phone connections, and sends information to another box outside that translates both kinds of information into fiber-optic data to be sent back and forth to Verizon.

I'm using a router (D-link, ISP provided) to split the Internet connection between a computer in my basement and the rest of the network, which is currently upstairs. I have had other computers in the basement off and on, including the laptop, which I recently upgraded to wireless. The other computers are inter-connected with a five-port switch and another router, which, for all intents and purposes, is a four-port switch on my network. I have everything set up this way because it's the only way to have enough ports without buying a bigger switch, which we didn't think we needed to do because we've so far been able to just expand the network by adding a few ports at a time, here and there. It's all worked well so far, and even as I type this post, everything is running perfectly, notwithstanding the two ports – one on the main router and one on the switch – that seem to have stopped working.

In addition to the laptop, I would like to be able to take advantage of the wireless Internet options of my Nintendo DS game system, and eventually the Nintendo Revolution game console, neither of which support wired connections in any capacity. Some of the extra ports get taken up when friends of mine come over with their own computers for gaming. They prefer the PC environment, and I don't really have a machine here that can accommodate them.

That's what I'm trying to accomplish.

As to your solution, the printer, by default, is assigned an IP of 0.0.0.9, well outside the DHCP range. I don't know whether or not it's picking up an IP; the configuration options list all of my computers as DHCP clients, as well as one "unknown," and one blank. Either the blank or the unknown could be the secondary "switch" router, the access point, or the printer. In any event, both IPs are within the DHCP range. The documentation for the AP says that it can both receive and assign DHCP addresses, but when configuring it I can only find one setting, presumably to act as a DHCP server.

With the switches as they are, I can't configure them. The five-port is just a switch, and doesn't have the software for that. Since I'm not using the Internet port on the secondary router, I can't get to the software setup for it. It's acting like a switch. Sooo... that leaves the printer and the AP to be having an IP conflict, right?

I find that I can't ping 0.0.0.9. Does that mean that the printer isn't using that IP anymore? If so, then it must be using one of the others in my router's DHCP log. I can ping one of those, but I get an "Apache web server" page when I plug it into my browser. Same thing happens when I do that with IPs for other computers. The other logged IP doesn't do anything. This leads me to believe that the printer cannot be pinged.

The last thing would be that I might have tried to enable the AP as a DHCP server, thinking that, like with a router, it would be impossible for the main router to access the wireless computers to assign addresses for them. Should that be a problem? It's an AP, not a wireless router. Should the wired router be able to access the wireless portion of the network through the AP? If so, I don't need the AP configured as a DHCP server, which you're saying should fix the problem. I'll have to try that and see if it works.

Thank you for responding. Talking to the wall hasn't been working so well for me. Now at least I have something to try. :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
My guess is you have different IP subnets and more than 1 DHCP session operational.

I know FIOS quite well. You probably have the D-Link 604 router supplied by Verizon.

As I recall the D-Link router has a 192.168.0.1 base IP address.

Here is what you need to do.

You can probably leave the D-Link DHCP range set to default.
Turn the DHCP off on the wireless access point and the Linksys router.
Set your printer IP address to something in the same subnet, I typically use something like 192.168.0.200
Set your wireless access point LAN IP address to 192.168.0.201
Set your Linksys router LAN IP address to 192.168.0.202
Only connect the WAN side of the D-Link router, do not use the WAN side of the Linksys router.

Reboot all machines and reconfigure the printer port IP address on all machines to 192.168.0.200 and you should be good to go.

You should be able to ping all devices on the same subnet without issue. If you have no response, this may be due to a firewall or if the ping reply is disabled on a device.

JamesO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
All right, I've had it working for a couple of days now without problems, so I'm assuming we've solved it. In case anyone else runs into a similar problem:

The Netgear WG602 Access point has the option to be set up as a DHCP client – despite the suggestion of server options listed on the website, I haven't been able to find an option for it, though under this configuration you wouldn't need it anyway. I think what solved the problem was disabling the AP as a client. You were right, JamesO; for some reason, having the AP set within the DHCP range of the router was messing things up, which leads me to wonder why the option exists at all. Maybe the idea was that you might not be using a router on some networks?

Thanks for your help. Your info was comprehensive, and you managed to show me a couple of things I hadn't tried already. If I have any more issues I can't solve on my own, I'll probably come back to the Tech Support Forums! :grin:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top