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Discussion Starter #1
Setup at home:

Verizon DSL
D-Link DI-624
Desktop PC #1, WinXP-SP2, connected to router via Cat5
Desktop PC #2, WinXP-SP2, connected to router via Cat5
Laptop, WinXP-SP2, with (internal) Intel PRO/Wireless 2200BG (802.11b/g)

Desktop #1 is ‘shared’ to both the other desktop and the laptop as a network drive since it’s our main computer where most of our family files reside.

Previously owned a Sony Vaio laptop that used the D-Link wireless PCI card that came with the router. This setup worked great, but the laptop couldn’t meet our growing needs.

Enter the new Toshiba laptop with built-in wireless. Oh, incidentally, the signal strength of our WEP secured WLAN is usually ‘excellent’ and rarely ‘very good’.

The new laptop connects very quickly when turned on. After about five or ten minutes the connection speed will drop from 54mbps to 11, sometimes to 5, but always finally ending at 1 mbps at which time the connection is lost and I can no longer access either the internet or the network drive on PC#1. So the total connection time is only lasting for 10 to 20 minutes.

If I pull up the network connections dialog, and hit the repair tool, it’ll get the connection back after about half a minute, but still won’t last longer than 20 minutes, give or take.

So what’s changed since it worked well:
Change from Sony to Toshiba laptop, from wireless PCI card to built-in 2200BG. Also, my WLAN was unsecured before. I enabled WEP at the time of the purchase of the new laptop.

I suspect it may be a problem in my router’s security settings or something wrong in the new laptop’s networking setup.

Help!
 

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It actually sounds more like interference with the wireless signal, or malware/spyware to me. I can't imagine why it would gradually slow down due to network settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I've been able to improve it a bit.

I tried a couple things last night that yielded some positive results.

First, I upgraded the firmware for my DI-624 from V2.35 to V2.52 (I may not be remembering the right numbers exactly right now).

Then I downgraded the security from the highest form of WPA down to WEP. I did this because I saw in another thread there may be some benefit in performance by using the hexidecimal key in lieu of the passphrase.

Anybody agree?

Lastly, I changed the channel from the default '6' to '9'. The catch was, in Super-G mode channel 6 was the only option, so I had to disable that mode.

Is it true that my Intel ProWireless 2200BG wouldn't have been able to take advantage of the Super-G mode anyway?

Well, after all this, something helped because I was able to maintain an internet connection for an hour, during a test, longer than I have seen for some time. I did check the connection speed a couple time during the hour-long test and there were some reductions from 54mbps down to twenty-something (again I don't recall the exact number right now) and once it even went down to 1mbps, but a 'repair' was never needed.

Any other ideas?
 

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The fact that the wireless speed is wandering all over the place seems to indicate some interference with the wireless signal. Does this happen if you put the two units close to each other?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll give it a try

I haven't had the laptop in the same room as the access point since I bought it, so I'll have to try it out too see if the connection speed holds at 54mbps.
 
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