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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the market for a new high end laptop. I'm looking at a Dell XPS 15 and a high end HP Envy laptop. I know both manufacturers are going to hose my operating system with junk before they ship it off, and so here is my question -

If I reload Windows 7 on a brand new laptop, does that void the warranty?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It will most likely come with Windows 7 Home Premium, and I have a home premium disk already so I think I will be ok. Thank you once again! Love this forum :tongue:
 

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You have a full retail Windows 7 DVD with keycode?

I agree with you about the preinstalled garbage. But you can get rid of it quite easily.

Revo Free - http://www.revouninstaller.com/revo_uninstaller_free_download.html

Warranty should still be fine. Be sure to burn a set of recovery DVDs using the Dell or HP creation software before you wipe the HDD and install full retail Windows 7. If need be, you'll have the option to reinstall the OEM version.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2

`
 

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Absolutely agree on making your backup disks first, if Dell didn't provide them with the system. Some of the newer Dell desktops I've been seeing don't, but older desktops and laptops always had them included. I don't know if they have stopped including them with laptops yet. I'd be interested to know.

If they do, you can use those disks to install the system clean. The Dell OS disk doesn't include the junk. It's the driver disk that does, and that one allows you to pick and choose. Dell has been better with this than other manufacturers.

When I got my Studio XPS, there wasn't a lot of junk. They did install McAfee, but that's easy enough to get rid of with the McAfee Removal Tool. I did upgrade the OS to Win 7 Ultimate though...
 

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And no, installing a different version of Windows 7 does *not* void the warranty in the US, contrary to our Indian tech (from Dell support, no less...). You lose support for Windows on that machine from the OEM if you didn't use the Dell disc to reinstall (because the OEM supports the Windows 7 install on that machine, and/or any recovery installs from shipped media or a recovery partition only). The machine itself's warranty is *not* in any way changed by what OS you run, Windows 7 (either retail or the OEM install from the vendor), as that would violate a few US laws. Reinstalling an OS from anything other than what the vendor ships may void a service contract, but you would purchase that above and beyond the warranty provided with the hardware at the time of sale - if you didn't specifically add a service contract for the machine, you don't have to worry about that. You will be fine if you reinstall Windows 7, either from a retail package or from a recovery disc or reinstall disc from the OEM (note, for example, Dell themselves show you how to do this, HERE). I would expect a Dell tech support person to understand this, at least, but he may not be up on the intricacies of US law with regards to warranties on products sold here - the hardware warranty and the OS support for the software on that machine are two different things, and changing the OS in no way would void the warranty - in fact, even opening the machine itself with tools to work on/replace "user-serviceable" parts like RAM, hard drive, PCI cards, etc. no longer voids the warranty, although certain portions may be restricted if they are not serviceable.

The only thing to know is that you will need to be aware of who to call for Windows support if you do install Windows 7 again (Microsoft if you reinstall from a retail package, the vendor if you reinstall from recovery/reinstall media shipped with the machine or from a recovery partition preconfigured on the machines), but hardware support will come from the OEM regardless.
 

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just add to what cluberti said, if you purchased the full retail version or upgrade version of win7 separately from the manufacturer of the computer, then some manufacturers will still provide software support.

Another post indicated uninstall all the oem junk that comes with the computer. That is what I do, usually takes about an hour going through and getting rid of it all.
 

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Rather then reinstall Windows, just run the PC Decrapifier, this will show you all the bloat ware on the computer and give you the choice to uninstall it all with a few clicks.
 

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@ Daifne : yes Dell has stopped shipping OS DVD's with the system(laptop & desktop),now you only get the Driver CD & softwares that were shipped with the computer..
 

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That's not true either, [email protected] The desktops I've been seeing have no disks at all shipped with them. There is software that usually has to be installed after setup that can be used to make the recovery disks, but there are none included. I find it a bit disturbing how it's setup now. If the customer doesn't notice the prompt to download and install DataSafe, there is no way to create the disks. If they do notice and install, there's still no prompt to create the disks (which most customers will ignore anyway, but that's not the issue here). Dell has made this much more difficult for the average user. More difficult than it needs to be.
 

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I wouldn't blame them for wanting to keep the recovery information on a partition at the front of the disk rather than on a DVD/CD. It means that people aren't likely to loose it, and can improve performance when you want to go through with it.

How about you just uninstall the crapware, and keep the usefulware. With my laptop, I did just that and it works just fine for me. There are some specific things for your hardware configuration that you may find useful, such as power settings, and lighting that some fancy laptops have.

I bet if you managed to find and download a retail version of a Windows 7 image, you could use it and install it. Then you can use the same product key that came as part of the OEM to activate it just fine, since the key is attached to the computer/motherboard.
 

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Er, Jay, are you suggesting that the OP get a pirated version of Windows? Not good. Even using the key on the COA with pirated software is against Microsoft's terms. Besides, you won't have the proper drivers for a Dell laptop included on one of those disks. Thirdly, a downloaded disk could easily include something much worse than the bloatware that the manufacturers include.

Having the recovery partition on the drive is fine, until the drive dies. The only way to reinstall then is to either buy the recovery disks from Dell if you haven't made your own, which is now difficult for average users, or use the ones they did make.
 

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Er, Jay, are you suggesting that the OP get a pirated version of Windows? Not good. Even using the key on the COA with pirated software is against Microsoft's terms. Besides, you won't have the proper drivers for a Dell laptop included on one of those disks. Thirdly, a downloaded disk could easily include something much worse than the bloatware that the manufacturers include.

Having the recovery partition on the drive is fine, until the drive dies. The only way to reinstall then is to either buy the recovery disks from Dell if you haven't made your own, which is now difficult for average users, or use the ones they did make.
No, nothing about being pirated. A retail/OEM/manufactuer copy of Windows 7 and the product key are two different things. The copy of Windows 7 has what is included, while the key works to activate it, which can come in retail form (can be moved between PC's) and OEM form (bound to the motherboard hardware, and typically cheaper). There is already a legitimate product key available and bound to the motherboard/computer, so there isn't any problems. You can wipe the computer completely as many times as you want now, and reinstall it. Just try to remember to install the right version, as a product key for Home Premium won't activate Windows 7 if you choose to install Ultimate or anything else.

In terms of drivers, you can download them yourself and apply them from the manufacturers website, a good reason to just only uninstall what you don't want. Windows Updates can help you as well with that.

My laptop does have a program installed that allows you to create a recovery disk. A backup I suppose in case the disk dies, and I replace it. Then I have both a copy on the hard drive, or on as many DVD's as I want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ok guys here is what I am going to do -

1. Use Ghost or the HP/Dell utility and create a recovery partition (Will make two copies of the Ghost image)

2. Re-Install using a Windows 7 Home Premium OEM disk that I already own.
 

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Good luck to you sir - hope all is well on the other side of your Win7 install.
 
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