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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will this PSU work with this Spike Guard Extension?
I didn't need this extension - I only bought because the PSU's power cable is UK type and is not compatible in my country. This extension has two universal sockets. I also have a generic PSU power cable which is compatible but I'm not sure I should plug that in this PSU or not.

The PSU goes to spike guard, spike guard goes to UPS, UPS goes to main power outlet.
I did hear that ups should go to spike guard and it should have it's own spike guard. But the necessity of such thing here is different.

Thanks in advance.
 

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The PSU goes to spike guard, spike guard goes to UPS, UPS goes to main power outlet.
Every UPS manual I have ever seen advises against using a surge and spike protector with the UPS. And I agree.

When you plug a UPS into a surge and spike protector (S&SP), the UPS monitoring circuits can see the power from the S&SP as dirty and flip to battery power more than needed or just try to clean it up putting extra strain and wear and tear on those circuits.

When you plug a S&SP into a UPS, the UPS often sees the load as unstable and may cut power to protect the UPS and the connected equipment.

So I recommend you plug your computer into the UPS and plug the UPS into the wall and leave the Spike Guard totally out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Every UPS manual I have ever seen advises against using a surge and spike protector with the UPS. And I agree.

When you plug a UPS into a surge and spike protector (S&SP), the UPS monitoring circuits can see the power from the S&SP as dirty and flip to battery power more than needed or just try to clean it up putting extra strain and wear and tear on those circuits.

When you plug a S&SP into a UPS, the UPS often sees the load as unstable and may cut power to protect the UPS and the connected equipment.

So I recommend you plug your computer into the UPS and plug the UPS into the wall and leave the Spike Guard totally out.
Okay, I think someone told me this before too here. That's why I wasn't willing to buy it.

But what option then I have to use the UK (type G) plug? It doesn't fit the socket in my country (type D).
There are converters online and I also have a generic power cable whose picture I posted. What to do?
 

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There's no reason you cannot use an adapter as long as it is of good quality and not damaged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
There's no reason you cannot use an adapter as long as it is of good quality and not damaged.
Yes that's what I wanted to be sure about! Thanks.

Would you take a look at these two products? One says it can change 5A plug to a 10A plug and another doesn't say much except that the max power output is 6A-10A. Which one seems better?

UK/US/EU Universal Travel Plug Adapter to Indian 3 Pin Power Plug / Converter | eBay

https://www.amazon.in/Norwood-Mobil...e=UTF8&qid=1504984723&sr=8-1&keywords=norwood

I also found a good quality (hopefully) generic power cable with a 5A fuse which is compatible to the sockets.

https://www.amazon.in/Graydice-Qual...F8&qid=1504984931&sr=1-6&keywords=power+cable
 

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It is the current (amperes or A) in a circuit that, when excessive, causes heat. Both of those support up to 10A so either one work. I like the smaller black one and you could buy 3 for the price of the other. However, the indicator light on the other telling you there is power is nice. If there is a question if the wall socket is "hot" or not, the indicator light may be handy.

If you cannot find a power cable that already has the correct connector on it (so you don't need an adapter), then it looks like that one will work fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
It is the current (amperes or A) in a circuit that, when excessive, causes heat. Both of those support up to 10A so either one work. I like the smaller black one and you could buy 3 for the price of the other. However, the indicator light on the other telling you there is power is nice. If there is a question if the wall socket is "hot" or not, the indicator light may be handy.

If you cannot find a power cable that already has the correct connector on it (so you don't need an adapter), then it looks like that one will work fine.
Thank you. My cable and adapter both has arrived. I'm using with the cable currently.

But please explain this to me -

1. my UPS is old and says has capacity of 600VA. Output wattage I couldn't find in manual. Now when the power is off, The UPS is making strange sound while giving backup, even if the pc is off. It doesn't make any sound if the PSU is switched off or if the cable is plugged off.

This UPS also powers my LED monitor and a 4.1 sound system.

2. I was testing the UPS whether it makes sound or not without the pc attached. My pc cable was in my right hand and the left hand was on UPS. My main power socket's grounding is new and working and was off totally (power cut). Yet, when I turned the UPS on without the pc attached to see whether it makes sound or not, it gave me shock. Now it seemed to me the shock came from the metal pins of PSU cable. But it was totally detached, How can it give shock unless some current was still on the pins?! - I don't even know whether it is possible or not.

Anyways, what might be the problem it seems?

There is no sound or heating or shock when the main power is on.
 

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1. There is no standard formula to convert VA to watts because several variables come into play, in particular, the "power factor" (PF). But the formula to convert is:

VA x PF = W

If the power factor is not known, the safe rule of thumb is to use 60% or .6.

So in your case, 600 x .6 = 360W. While 360W is not a lot, it is to support your computer, monitor, and your network gear too (as long as the batteries are still good - they typically need to be replaced every 3 - 5 years).

Assuming you are talking about the computer listed in your System Specs, when I plug those values into the eXtreme PSU calculator as seen here, even with adding a little padding, the recommended UPS is 500VA so you have plenty to give you even a little extra battery run time - a good thing.

It is not uncommon for UPS to make a humming or slight buzzing sound when on batteries. Many UPS also have small fans to keep the DC to AC converters cool and some can be noisy.

2. I am not sure I understand where the shock came from. Unless you power off the UPS with its master power switch, it will output power. You could have also received shock from a static discharge.

However, something could be wrong. You say the main power socket is new - how do you know it was properly wired and more importantly is properly grounded to "Earth" ground? I recommend every home owner and computer user have access to a AC Outlet Tester to ensure your outlet is properly wired and grounded. I recommend one with a GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupt) indicator as it can be used to test bathroom and kitchen outlets too. These testers can be found for your type and voltage outlet, foreign or domestic, (like this one, for example, for the UK) at most home improvement stores. Use it to test all the outlets in the house and if a fault is shown, have it fixed by a qualified electrician.
 
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