Tech Support banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can someone please recommend a cheap wifi access point (not router) that is good for going through brick walls (no metal reinforcement). Something 150mps or faster.

I wasted a lot of time googling, but only finding ‘routers’.
Thank you.
 

·
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
26,496 Posts
If a friend has a Repeater (That and Range Extender are what they're called), try theirs. You might find a $30.00 one does the trick or even the $100 ones don't do the "Superman" thing. Don't be fooled by so called "Best 10" sites. They're selling something. Stick with a major brand.
 

·
Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
Can someone please recommend a cheap wifi access point (not router) that is good for going through brick walls (no metal reinforcement). Something 150mps or faster.

I wasted a lot of time googling, but only finding ‘routers’.
Thank you.
Rick, it's not really the case of a router or AP brand. It's like asking for an FM radio that gets better reception in front of a brick wall. You've got a wall blocking the Wifi signal and that's your road block.
 

·
Windows Tech Team
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Are there any that don't? I've lived in brick apartment buildings, live in a brick house, and I can pick up on the WiFi from every modem-router I've ever had anywhere in the house and through most of the yard. One of those was, at one time, located in the basement.

You won't get maximum signal strength, but you get more than enough for web browsing, e-mailing, etc. Even streaming.

I'm currently connected to WiFi via a cell phone being used as a hotspot where the phone is on the second floor of the house and I am in a brick room that was added on to the house, on the first floor, with no direct line of sight. The Windows 10 WiFi strength icon shows 3 bars, and a speedtest shows 13 Mbps, well above what I used to get using DSL with a modem router in the next room (which was the fault of the DSL, not the modem-router).

Certainly not ultra high speed, but way, way more than adequate for virtually everything I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all for replies.
I’ll try to describe my problem.
I had a Cisco AIR-AP1231G-A-K9 in the house which was ok, but outside (past the brick wall) I can get the signal, but too slow to stream any video on my laptop.
So I replaced it with a TP-Link TL-WA701ND which is faster, but the signal is too weak to go through the wall.
So, i’m looking for something a little faster than the Cisco, with a stronger signal than the TP-Link so I can use my laptop in the yard.
 

·
Windows Tech Team
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Do you have any options with regard to changing the placement of the access point in the house itself? Does it have to sit in "that room" next to "that wall"? Could it be placed close to a window on the side of the house that is nearest the part of the yard where you'd like to use your laptop? Could it be placed on a second floor?

I would certainly try alternate positioning with any that you have (if you kept the old, as well as its replacement) before ever considering getting another one.
 

·
Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
You're missing the point. You're trying to fix a degraded signal that's being blocked by a brick wall with a new piece of hardware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all again for replies.

So I pulled my other old Cisco (AIR-CAP3502I-A-K9 its faster than the AIR-AP1231G-A-K9 ) out from the kitchen over to "that room" next to "that wall" (LOL) and put a Netgear WN3000RP in the garage and that arrangement seems to be ok . . not as fast as I’d like, but its acceptable.😁
 

·
Windows Tech Team
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Glad to hear you've got the central issue fixed, even if the result is not quite what you'd like.

When it comes to WiFi, the placement of the router is generally one of the most important factors, and if different locations can be tried out, that's often all that's necessary for getting the needed coverage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thank you all again for replies.

So I pulled my other old Cisco (AIR-CAP3502I-A-K9 its faster than the AIR-AP1231G-A-K9 ) out from the kitchen over to "that room" next to "that wall" (LOL) and put a Netgear WN3000RP in the garage and that arrangement seems to be ok . . not as fast as I’d like, but its acceptable.😁
WiFi will normally go through internal brick walls but external walls are more difficult to penetrate. Double brick is a lot thicker and brick veneer may contain sisalation which will shield the signal.

I have some outbuildings where where Internet service is required. The best solution is to run an Ethernet cable but that is not always practical. I have a cable running to one outbuilding and I tried many WiFi extender solutions to the other. I ended up spending a lot of money trying to get a strong consistent signal via an extender. I replaced the extender many times looking for a robust solution.

In the end, just before I started digging trenches, I tried a power line extender. Problem solved - it has worked solidly ever since (a few years) with the same hardware.

If you have a shed where an access point can be placed, connect it to the base router via the power lines. Obviously, the shed needs power connected.

The only down side to using the power line solution is that is is difficult, if not impossible, to use it with a UPS.

Regards
Jack
 

·
Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
No need to make this more complicated than it is. Brick is a hard, dense material (you can Google it) and it will negatively impact a wireless wifi signal no matter which router you're using. Steel and concrete buildings are even worse. Even book cases, filing cabinets and furniture will degrade wifi between rooms. This isn't rocket science
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top