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System Information and Wise system monitor on Windows 10 is showing me this
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What's wrong here? I have two 8GB ram sticks, so both of them are working because it shows more than 8gb is available. But why not full 16?

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Onboard graphic
 

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Onboard graphic
When you are using "onboard" or "integrated" graphics, a chunk of system (installed physical) RAM is stolen... err... I mean "shared" with the graphics solution. This is normal. You can limit the amount being shared but then you take essential RAM away from the graphics solution. And since so much of today's computing tasks is graphics intensive, and because you have a decent amount of RAM installed and that is being recognized properly, I would leave it and not worry about it.

That said, if you do want full use of your installed system RAM, the solution is to install a separate graphics card. Graphics cards have dedicated RAM for the GPU (graphics processing unit) mounted right on the graphics card. So no system RAM will need to be stolen... err... I mean shared.

The only downside to installing a graphics card is power. It is often the case where the graphics card is the most power hungry device in our systems. So it is not uncommon to require a bigger power supply to support adding a graphics card. This will need to be addressed BEFORE installing any additional hardware.

Will adding a card improve your computer's performance? Yes. No. Maybe. It depends on how you use your computer. If you just do typical MS Office type tasks (Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, etc.), email, Facebook, watch YouTube videos, surf the Internet, it is not likely you will see any improvement. If you play graphics intensive games or do serious graphics editing tasks, you might see some significant gains - it really depends on the game or editing task.
 

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To see what is currently using RAM/Memory on you computer and how much, press [Ctrl][Shift][Esc] to load Task Manager, then under the Processes tab (top left), click the "Memory" column header a time or two until the information is sorted by what is using the most memory at the top.

Doc - Citizen Lab's "Security Planner" (Bruce Schneier advisor) - Motherboard's comprehensive "Guide to Not Getting Hacked" - EFF's "Surveillance Self-Defense" - John Scott-Railton's "Digital Security Low Hanging Fruit" - "Digital Security and Privacy for Human Rights Defenders"

 

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Discussion Starter #4
When you are using "onboard" or "integrated" graphics, a chunk of system (installed physical) RAM is stolen... err... I mean "shared" with the graphics solution. This is normal. You can limit the amount being shared but then you take essential RAM away from the graphics solution. And since so much of today's computing tasks is graphics intensive, and because you have a decent amount of RAM installed and that is being recognized properly, I would leave it and not worry about it.

That said, if you do want full use of your installed system RAM, the solution is to install a separate graphics card. Graphics cards have dedicated RAM for the GPU (graphics processing unit) mounted right on the graphics card. So no system RAM will need to be stolen... err... I mean shared.

The only downside to installing a graphics card is power. It is often the case where the graphics card is the most power hungry device in our systems. So it is not uncommon to require a bigger power supply to support adding a graphics card. This will need to be addressed BEFORE installing any additional hardware.

Will adding a card improve your computer's performance? Yes. No. Maybe. It depends on how you use your computer. If you just do typical MS Office type tasks (Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, etc.), email, Facebook, watch YouTube videos, surf the Internet, it is not likely you will see any improvement. If you play graphics intensive games or do serious graphics editing tasks, you might see some significant gains - it really depends on the game or editing task.
Thank you for explaining so nicely and in details. Hmm I'm a designer. So maybe won't need gpu power like a video editor, but I heard some processes like the painting brush engine in photoshop uses gpu? Anyways, I will be getting a basic gtx card soon. 4Gb Video memory should be enough to power two FHD monitors?
And again thank you for your time and patience.
 

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If it shows up on the monitor, it uses the GPU. The amount of video memory is not really the issue when it comes to powering a monitor (or 2). Your current integrated RAM most likely can do that now (if your board has the necessary connectors). What matters is the content. Viewing photos or even YouTube videos or streaming Netflix in HD is easy. Viewing multiple animated, independent objects in a complex interactive game without any hesitation is hard.

I might suggest you check out this to get some idea of what's out there: Best Graphics Cards for Gaming in 2020

And remember, don't buy a card without ensuring your PSU can support it.
 
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