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Look in the vents on the outside, you'll often get leaves and other things drop into them and start rubbing on the squirrel cage as Spyware mentioned.
I normally use a length of wire to pull the leaves out, there is normally nothing you can hurt in the back, but be careful and unplug it anyway.
I've used magnets to hold screen over the vents when I had mine under a beech tree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hopefully replaced under warranty?
Yes, though I had to pay for another one for the next one. Our house has central AC, but for some reason it doesn't work upstairs, You feel a huge temperature difference when you walk up and down from the second floor. Then again, as you go into my room, facing the outside of the house. If I owned if I'd look into getting this fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hmmm. Is it a basement and the main floor above it, or a two story house on a slab?
basement and two floors above it. I wonder if the oil furnace might have something to do with it, anyway the owner won't get it fixed, oh well.
 

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You really need a heating/cooling "zone" for each floor. That way your system has 3 thermostats. In cooling season, you set them all to your temp, say 78 degrees and each floor only gets cool air when that floor gets above 78. So the upstairs might get cool air 2 or 3 times while the main floor only gets cool air 1 time and the basement gets no cool air. These systems can adapt to any forced-air heating system by installing electric dampers that are then coded to open only when their thermostat turns on the cooling. Landlords are notoriously bad about spending money on rental properties, so I can sympathize with your situation.
 

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Most modern ACs keep a small amount of water in the exhaust area to help cool the condenser as an energy saving method. Older units drained the condensate completely, and relied on air movement alone. When in use, the cage blower picks up and sprays the water which often makes a scratching noise from droplets hitting the sides
 
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