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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,

I know defragmentation should be turned off for an SSD but I've read conflicting articles about how system restore and search indexing should be turned off or not for the life of the SSD.

Do they really create as much wear as some articles say? Does turning off search index do more than just slow down search results?
 

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Actually, there is no reason to defragment an SSD. There is no concept of seek time and rotational delay with the SSD, it's all direct access.

The function of system restore doesn't change whether you're using an SSD or a hard disk, so turning that off makes no sense! If you need to use system restore, the type of disk memory you have will have no bearing.

OTOH, search indexing probably doesn't bring anything to the party, and I have it off on all my drives.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually, there is no reason to defragment an SSD. There is no concept of seek time and rotational delay with the SSD, it's all direct access.

The function of system restore doesn't change whether you're using an SSD or a hard disk, so turning that off makes no sense! If you need to use system restore, the type of disk memory you have will have no bearing.

OTOH, search indexing probably doesn't bring anything to the party, and I have it off on all my drives.
Oops sorry I meant to say off haha.

I see, I don't really see a need for search index since the SSD is fast enough either way so I might turn it off if it does put that much wear each time I search for something.

I mean doesn't system restore need to write a considerable amount of GB each time a restore is created automatically?
 

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Yes, system restore does write to the drive. That's the whole point, you need current data to restore if you need it! I don't think individual restore points are gigabytes, not that much changes.

How Long Do SSDs Really Last?

A quote from that page.

A typical TBW figure for a 250 GB SSD lies between 60 and 150 terabytes written. That means, to get over a guaranteed TBW of 70, a user would have to write 190 GB daily over one year (in other words, to fill two-thirds of the SSD with new data every day). While in a consumer environment, this is highly unlikely, in a 21st-century business, it is highly plausible.

The typical SSD should last longer than the typical hard disk, yet we don't seem to spend all the angst over hard drive failing, which they do on a regular basis! Why would you compromise your system reliability and stability because years down the road the SSD may fail a few months earlier, and even that is pretty unlikely to be caused by excessive writes!


In addition, the whole point of having regular and complete backups are so when any type of mass storage fails, you have a backup copy and can restore to your new hard disk and be on your way.

Refer to my signature line for words of wisdom, expecially if you haven't considered proper backup in your computer operations. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, system restore does write to the drive. That's the whole point, you need current data to restore if you need it! I don't think individual restore points are gigabytes, not that much changes.

How Long Do SSDs Really Last?

A quote from that page.

A typical TBW figure for a 250 GB SSD lies between 60 and 150 terabytes written. That means, to get over a guaranteed TBW of 70, a user would have to write 190 GB daily over one year (in other words, to fill two-thirds of the SSD with new data every day). While in a consumer environment, this is highly unlikely, in a 21st-century business, it is highly plausible.

The typical SSD should last longer than the typical hard disk, yet we don't seem to spend all the angst over hard drive failing, which they do on a regular basis! Why would you compromise your system reliability and stability because years down the road the SSD may fail a few months earlier, and even that is pretty unlikely to be caused by excessive writes!


In addition, the whole point of having regular and complete backups are so when any type of mass storage fails, you have a backup copy and can restore to your new hard disk and be on your way.

Refer to my signature line for words of wisdom, expecially if you haven't considered proper backup in your computer operations. :D
Thanks, I should be good on backups online since I don't have many important files to save.
I looked at indexing options and it looks like it only does it automatically for Start Menu and Users: Screenshot

I had to rebuild my index because I accidently deselected some items so now I'm here.

Do one of these files refer to files including my pictures and documents or are they some other important files that may be best left to be indexed?
 

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Indexing doesn't really change any functionality, it just gives faster access to data. However, it can have a moderate to significant hit to your perforance all the time. Like I said, I've never allowed it to run on any of my systems, and I don't miss it.

Turn Off Indexing in Windows for Better Performance

General consensus is for an SSD, it's best to disable indexing.

If you really want something to find files by name fast, consider Everything Search. This is one of my "must have" tools and saves me countless hours when I'm looking for an obscure file on one of my drives. :) Here's the Everything FAQ that you can see what it's all about.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Indexing doesn't really change any functionality, it just gives faster access to data. However, it can have a moderate to significant hit to your perforance all the time. Like I said, I've never allowed it to run on any of my systems, and I don't miss it.

Turn Off Indexing in Windows for Better Performance

General consensus is for an SSD, it's best to disable indexing.

If you really want something to find files by name fast, consider Everything Search. This is one of my "must have" tools and saves me countless hours when I'm looking for an obscure file on one of my drives. :) Here's the Everything FAQ that you can see what it's all about.
Thank you, in that case I'll give it a try.
Do you need to disable indexing for the SSD selectively or can you just disable windows search and you're good?
 

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I just disable search completely, I don't see any need for it to run and it improves performance as a side benefit. Go into services, and set the startup type of Windows Search to Disabled.

Rectangle Font Line Screenshot Pattern
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just disable search completely, I don't see any need for it to run and it improves performance as a side benefit. Go into services, and set the startup type of Windows Search to Disabled.

View attachment 331873
Thanks! Just wasn't sure if I had to uncheck the box as well since it takes a while to disable indexing on individual drives: Screenshot

Although if you're sure that disabling the service is all that is necessary sounds good!
 

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If you disable the service, all indexing activity stops on all drives. Obviously, you should also click STOP on the service or simply reboot to apply the disabled setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you disable the service, all indexing activity stops on all drives. Obviously, you should also click STOP on the service or simply reboot to apply the disabled setting.
I see, sorry to ask but I was curious why it takes so long to stop indexing on one drive as I did this before on a HDD. Would anything be "leftover" if it was allowed even though the service disables it completely?
 

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Instead of relying on System Restore, once your computer is up and running as you like, you should make an Image File of your computer with Macrium Reflect or your favorite Clone software. Save the image to a different drive. If disaster occurs, you can easily restore your computer in minutes instead of hours or days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Instead of relying on System Restore, once your computer is up and running as you like, you should make an Image File of your computer with Macrium Reflect or your favorite Clone software. Save the image to a different drive. If disaster occurs, you can easily restore your computer in minutes instead of hours or days.
Thanks but I only have one drive and don't plan on buying another, I'll just use system restore.
 

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Thanks but I only have one drive and don't plan on buying another, I'll just use system restore.
I think you missed the meaning of my signature line! You need to do your own backup for your data! All system restore will do is potentially fix some system errors due to bad updates or corrupted operating system files.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think you missed the meaning of my signature line! You need to do your own backup for your data! All system restore will do is potentially fix some system errors due to bad updates or corrupted operating system files.
Nono don't worry I did backups online of my important files already so I'm fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think you missed the meaning of my signature line! You need to do your own backup for your data! All system restore will do is potentially fix some system errors due to bad updates or corrupted operating system files.
Hi again
I was thinking about the difference between disabling the service and unchecking indexing to be allowed.

I believe the difference is disabling the service doesn't create any additional index files but keeps the index files that exist whereas unchecking the box to "allow file indexing" on drive properties will delete all index files on the drive, do you think this is correct?
 

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That's perhaps true, never gave it a thought. ;) Even if you decide to go around and uncheck all the boxes, I still recommend you disable the service. The object of the exercise, after all, is to remove the performance hit of the constant indexing. FWIW, all the leftover index entries will do is consume a few megabytes of your multi-gigabyte drives, not exactly a big deal. :unsure:
 

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Nono don't worry I did backups online of my important files already so I'm fine.
If you only have "one drive" what are you backing up to? Whatever you are backing up to, you can make an image file which is a backup. and save it to that location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If you only have "one drive" what are you backing up to? Whatever you are backing up to, you can make an image file which is a backup. and save it to that location.
It's too much of a hassle for me, I don't mind reinstalling apps on a clean install if I have to.

I use Onedrive to backup any important files online which isn't much and they're not that important really.
 
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