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Discussion Starter #1
In hindsight, I wish I had configured RAID striping on my new system for better performance. I'd really like to do this on the Intel controller, but I've already formatted a SATA drive and have everything on it I want.

I understand that setting up a RAID configuration will wipe the data off the drives I'm configuring. Is it possible for me to get another matching drive, configure it and my other blank drive as RAID, then format the array by copying my formatted SATA drive to it from my Promise SATA port? I believe I'd have to uninstall the Intel EB controller off the existing format since the controller would show up as ER on the RAID array.

Any thoughts? Should I not be lazy and simply start over from scratch? Any tips for formatting a RAID array to make the best use of it? (Such as separate partitions for swap file, etc.) I've never used RAID before, but the more I read about it, the better it looks. My system specs are in my sig.
 

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I think that there is a way to convert. You do need to have the RAID edition of the IAA installed.

Check the Intel Application Accelerator RAID Edition- User's Manual chapter 18 for migration instructions. If I read it right, according to chapter 5 you will not need to reinstall XP.

After all the BIOS setup and IAA installations, you will run the IAA, click the RAID tab, right-click on RAID Volumes, and from the menu choose the "Create From Existing Disk" option. After that it looks pretty straightforward.

BTW I had read in chapter 5 that all sorts of protection is in place for if the migration gets interrupted, such that you won't lose data. Yet still it seems there are some severe warning boxes that will pop up which you will need to accept. Thay also warn you in the text to back up your data before the migration... I have no suggestions there, do whatever you feel appropriate.

Hope this helps,

-clintfan
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Long story short, I'll need two drives to set up my RAID on, and then my third drive which has the OS and data on it to transfer everything over to the RAID drives, correct?

If I use my two existing drives, configurating them into RAID will wipe the data off?

I'm downloading the Intel RAID guide. Thanks for the link!
I've had the IAAR 3.5.2 installer downloaded for quite some time now, so I've got that and the floppy RAID drivers already.

The steps you typed out to configure RAID in another post was quite useful, so thanks for that, too. In my case, what steps would be omitted and altered?
Thanks!
 

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I have raid0 set up on the Intel raid controller. I have 2 x Maxtor DM9 SATA 80 Gig drives one on each of the SATA drive connections using both SATA cables for each drive i.e. power cable and data transfer cable.

Once an ARRAY is created, all info on those drives is lost. The RAID0 drives will become one large drive of 152.6 GB. If you have a third HDD with your operating sytem etc on and is connected to an IDE connection, you should end up with 2 HDD's. I believe you should then be able to copy the single drive onto you RAID0 drive.

The Intel driver for the SATA 1 and 2 connections.
The promise driver for the SATA RAID 1 and SATA RAID 2 connections.

I found it just as simple to do a clean install on the RAID0 array and load everything on.

I have used PartitionMagic 8.0 to partition my RAID0 array to show as 2 HDD's A large partition for general use and a 30 GiG partition for Flight Simulator (FS9).

I think you can only migrate if you are using RAID1 array. ie. 2 x 80 gig HDD will show up as 1 x 80 gig Hdd, because it mirrors the other drive for security purposes.

I might be wrong.


My system is working well with a RAID0 array.
 

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I'll need two drives to set up my RAID on, and then my third drive which has the OS and data on it to transfer everything over to the RAID drives, correct? If I use my two existing drives, configurating them into RAID will wipe the data off?
Well I don't really know for sure, but for now I'd say No. I trusted what I read in the Intel RAID IAA user manual, which led me to believe that IF your initial data is on, say, SATA_1 (remember IAA only works on the SATA ports!) then you could add a second drive on SATA_2 then run that IAA thing and choose the "Convert" option I described. It would need to be pretty sophisticated to deal with the Windows swap file, but maybe it is. AFAIK there was no mention of needing a 3rd drive, but maybe there's a way to do it that way too.


Here's how they COULD do the Convert (I don't really know for sure):

1. As soon as you add the second SATA you'll have double the diskspace as before; this gives Convert enough room to work with, even if SATA_1 was almost full at the time.

2. Next Convert might do something like, paint the first half of the new SATA_2 drive with the right half of all data on SATA_1.

3. Then paint the second half of SATA_2 with the left half of all SATA_1 data.

4. Now replace what's on SATA_1 with what it placed onto the second half of SATA_2 (here's where your old HDD gets wiped, but who cares).

5. Finally free-up the second half of SATA_2, do a bit of minor cleanup, and the migration is complete.


So my assumption was migration will not wipe out your original data UNTIL the migration is in its final stages of completion... until then your original disk would be essentially untouched.
But you know what they say about assumptions... :bandit:

-clintfan
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Perhaps the safest thing for me to do is attach to blank drives to the Intel SATA, and my existing drive to the Promise SATA (non-RAID). I configure the RAID 0 on Intel, then copy the old SATA from the Promise to the new array.

Perhaps that would result in a cool configuration since keeping audio files on the Promise drive afterwards should be beneficial.

I'm reading about the migration now that I was able to download the Intel manual finally. This looks sweet! I'll back up important data to CD, and will try this out today! If not anything else, this experience (good or bad) will help me learn hands-on so I can better help others on this forum!

The more I learn about this motherboard, the more it ROCKS!!!

Update - Now I'm debating on the possibility of doing RAID 1 instead. This would give me less of a performance boost, but if one drive fails I don't lose everything..
If I set my two 80GB drives up as RAID 0, could I then at a later date slap a 160GB disk on the Promise array as RAID 1 without having to reformat everything?
 

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If I set my two 80GB drives up as RAID 0, could I then at a later date slap a 160GB disk on the Promise array as RAID 1 without having to reformat everything?
I'm not sure, but my guess is No, the Promise is not that smart. You are talking about RAID 0+1 and that only works with 4 drives. I don't think it supports whatever is legal by straight math (e.g. 80+80<=160 so allow it). I could be wrong.

I think for 0+1 they stripe two of the drives, then each striped drive is mirrored to its own other drive.

You might be able to run that 160GB as JBOD though. I do think the Promise supports that: a mixed combination of RAID and non-RAID disks. Again I could be wrong.

-clintfan
 
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