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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Retail: 350GBP / 700USD
OEM: 120GBP / 240USD
(Vista Ultimate)

a) What are the main pros & cons for the OEM version?
b) If my HD, GPU, CPU fails, does that mean i will have to buy another key, or will MS supply one?
c) Also, does the same apply if i reinstall vista OEM on the same system?
 

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i believe it only intended for one pc system and that there is a digital key, also it depends what version, the cheap version probably supports 32b only where the expensive probably 64b and 32b, so if only using one system its a bargain
 

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By my understanding

A. OEM versions are linked to the hardware that you buy it with (normally the motherboard?) So if you sell the PC, Windows goes with it

B. If the undesirable occurred and it wouldn't re activate you'd ring Microsoft and explain what happened. They'd fix it (from what I've heard it isn't a hassle)

C. If you have to reinstall, and no hardware has changed then I can't see any activation issues but should there be a problem, ring Microsoft

Hope that helps :)
 

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The only difference is the license. A full retail version would allow you to get a new computer and install this version of Windows on that one also, as long as you deleted the first installation as it only allows it be installed on one computer at a time. The OEM version is married to one computer forever. If you have to throw that computer away, or even make major hardware changes, you may have to purchase a new license at that time.
 

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Here's the 4 Vista versions and their comparison:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsvista/getready/editions/default.mspx

Its illegal to change from one system to another. If you upgraded the hardware you installed (any) Vista on, you will have to buy another license for it even if its retail unless it be first time.

In other words, once a retail copy of Vista is installed on a PC it can be moved to another system only once.

"The first user of the software may reassign the license to another device one time. If you reassign the license, that other device becomes the "licensed device,"

" 1) failure of a validation check results in the loss of access to specific features; and 2) an increase in our warranty period from 90 days to 1 year, which brings Windows in line with most other Microsoft products,"

"The software will from time to time validate the software, update or require download of the validation feature of the software,"

"If after a validation check, the software is found not to be properly licensed, the functionality of the software may be affected."

Vista's new anti-piracy technologies is disgusting. Under the new program, a copy of Vista that's judged to be in violation of its license or is counterfeit is disabled after a set period, leaving the user access only to the default Web browser, and then only for an hour at a time

It aims at raking money by stealing personal rights.

OEM is totally bound onto the hardware it came with. There will also be issues for troubleshooting as there is a coding level difference in contents of Retail and OEM.

In Vista, security software may not function properly at all. Possibly the kernel may be protected which could prevent AV and other on-access monitors from intercepting file access. The nefarious Blue Pill rootkit capable of totally concealing malicious activity under Vista, is still not protected against.

Firefox 2.0.0.1 has a total of 34 Firefox bugs related to Windows Vista at Bugzilla database and 20 of which remain unfixed. Several are related to Vista's parental control features aswell as Firefox not being able to be set as the default browser in Vista. Updates may also fail if the application is installed to a directory other than the default. Thunderbird also has the same bug of not being able to act as Vista's default e-mail client as well as many others.

Your monitor, applications, games, printer, and other peripherals will most likely require new software (drivers) in order to work with Vista; the older the device, the less likely a new driver will become available

Vista is only available on DVD.

These are some of MS's nefarious flaws.
 

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Windows OEM licensing has apparently always been that way only it wasn't worded very well. Which given the way their licensing agreements are worded I'd believe it.

Vista does have a wide range of drivers available. During testing, it picked up all of them for our hardware.
I'm in two minds of their anti piracy measures, if you've brought the operating system then you should have no problems. It's when legitimate users get problems becomes a considerable concern to me.

And amazingly enough MSDN AA subscribers (and perhaps/probably other msdn subscribers) are able to get Vista spread out over 5 CDs :wink:
 

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Changing the CPU, GPU, HDD, RAM won't necessitate disposing of an OEM license. There is a certain algorithm that checks the need for re-activation; but you are still allowed to re-activate by phone in case of upgrades or failures. Changing a non-failed motherboard is currently considered by MS moving to a different device (and voids an OEM OS), but even this is arguable and I know of granted re-activations in Build 6000 Vista.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
o man, lol, im going to try oem for very first time, and if it works out bad. il stick to retail in future.
 

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You can't (i.e you're not supposed to) buy an OEM disk alone - since (as a prerequisite) it accompanies a computer or device, it HAS TO be bought together with the computer or device it accompanies (and it gets "married" to). Usually OEM software comes pre-installed by the computer's Original Manufacturer.
 

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Ive Just installed OEM and it works fine

Iv just installed the OEM version and it has worked fine. im running it on a AMD 3000+ 64bit with 1ghz of ram 256mb ATI video card and 160GB HDD. its an old computer. when i put the disc in it was going to install over the XP Pro that i had on this system. it put all the old windows files automaticaly into a folder called Windows Old that you can delete after the install. I had a few driver issues but i have sorted them out.
I guess i wont know till i have to format it but so far so good.
Vince
 

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I know this is a very old thread but It seems releveant.

Ive have Vista Home premium for about a week now (its been activated, unfortunatly I didnt realise about the 3 day thing) and I have a new CPU in the post. Will I get any issues installing it?

And even if it does lock up will Microsoft give me an activation key for a CPU change? I mean can I tell them? or is it against the EULA?
 
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