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Thanks Wizmo I have been reading about the circular polarizing and I like the sounds of it, yes the price is dearer so I have been looking on ebay and I have also read about fakes but this guy has 99.5% positive feed back
Hoya 58mm PRO1 Digital Circular Polarising PL Filter CPL C PL Multi Coating 58 | eBay
and I have looked at his negative feed back and only one is the filter that I want and he is not complaining about the quality and in the positive feed back with people who have bought the filter I want they are happy so you would think most of them would know what they are talking about.
 

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'Hoya' are the most popular and good value-for-money filters around, it depends on what you're photographing most. UV-filters can remove any blue-caste from pics shot in bright/sunny conditions, but not unwanted reflections. Circular-polarising filters will remove reflections from non-metallic surfaces, but can darken the photos - Both will protect the camera-lens from dust and scratches.

Although the circular-polarising filters can add an f-stop or 2, turning the filter approx. 1/4-turn 'opens' the filter to almost transparent again, although you might then see the reflections in the photo.

For the price of them, you could get both (though not simultaneously on the camera :lol:), you'd have the best of both sides then :grin:

1 handy tip though if leaving a filter on the lens permanently, is to get a 'filter-wrench', they're only a few $$ and make removing a stiff filter a lot easier - Filter-Wrenches
 

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Thanks WereBo all is getting stored in my limited memory bank :grin: I will wait till my camera arrives and then broach the subject with my managing director that I need to spend a bit more. I like the sound of the hoya Circular polarising filter and as you say I can rotate it rather than remove it all the time. I have been looking on the net at some before and after shots with the filter and I am impressed.
 

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When I was using my Practika SLR, I had one for each of my 3 lenses, permanently attached - They're still screwed on them, even though I haven't used the camera for years :lol: Sadly my Nikon-bridge hasn't got a filter-thread so I can't attach any filters to it :sigh:
 

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When I was using my Practika SLR, I had one for each of my 3 lenses, permanently attached - They're still screwed on them, even though I haven't used the camera for years :lol: Sadly my Nikon-bridge hasn't got a filter-thread so I can't attach any filters to it :sigh:
I can't remember the last time I removed my UV filters from ANY of my many and varied Canon lenses! Perhaps once or twice to remove a stray dust particle, maybe.
:cool:
 

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Hi Guys my camera arrived yesterday but I am not properly into it yet. Yesterday we had a Christmas party for my part time job and today and tomorrow I will be painting some ceilings in my house (nearly completed). Last night I charged the camera battery and this evening I have played with some settings clock date formatted the sd card in camera. I am finding my way around the menu I have to find the setting to change from RAW to JPG also there is somewhere a setting where you can put your glasses prescription in so you don't need to wear glasses when looking through the viewfinder. I'd like to give that a try because my glasses darken when I go outside. Also my lens as well as having a zoom function it also has a focus function and I'm not sure how that focus works but I have a friend with the model camera before mine with the same lens as mine and I will find out from him. There is a small manual and a huge PDF manual on computer so I am finding my way around that.
 

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Thank you, will look into what you mentioned.
I have always used Epson scanners and every model I have has always come with negative scanner plates as well. I haven't played with them in many years but I remember it being very easy to do rugrats. I am currently using and Epson V370 as my 4180 I used for over 9 years just recently died.
 

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@ Sandy - That's mainly how I finally chose my camera, I narrowed the choices down to 3~4 from various reviews, DLed the specific manuals for them, then finalised to my final choice.

I found the paper-manual a handy reference for finding the various knobs and dials, while working through the PDF-manual for what they do and how they do it, with the camera in my hands :lol:

From browsing through the lens-specs, it looks like the focus-function might be their equivalent of 'auto-focus', useful most of the time but sometimes it can lock onto the wrong bit of the picture, so having a manual-focus is really handy then.
 

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Yes WereBo I read something last night that led me to wonder if I were to select manual focus that the ring would come into play. I think the knob by the viewfinder which adjusts viewing magnification is the thing for glasses. I tried it last night and it doesn't appear to have enough magnification to replace my glasses. Well I have finished my painting so now I will have a play with my camera.
 

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In the fast-paced world of weddings, special events and some sporting events I have rarely had time to do manual focus. I generally use SPOT focus (one centered auto-focus zone) to be sure that what I put the little viewfinder dot on is what gets the focus. Often it may require a quick re-composition of the shot AFTER obtaining focus on the desired subject, but that can happen very quickly. I don't set for continuous auto-focus, so as long as I have the shutter release held down to the first stop, it will retain the set focus on the desired location until I fire the release.

It takes practice, and with things such as bouquet tosses it can be somewhat of a problem, but I generally pre-focus that on the bride before she lets it go and usually get excellent results.

Photography is a constant learning experience. New and varying conditions crop up often, and it takes much practice and experimentation to "get it right" 90+ % of the time as required when operating in a pro environment. :wink:

 

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So I take it you focus the little square bracket on the bride and half hold down and then move the camera where you want it eg the bride to one side and then click.
 

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So I take it you focus the little square bracket on the bride and half hold down and then move the camera where you want it eg the bride to one side and then click.
That's exactly how it works. As long as you do not have the setting for "continuous auto" on, the focus will hold until the shutter is fired. That is how I get what clients say is the "best shot of the reception!" It also works for the garter toss, if there is one! :smile:

I do beach weddings quite frequently, and one of my "signature shots" is the bride and groom tossing flowers into the sea. I've even gotten good at catching the corks flying out of the campaign bottle!! That takes split second timing... :grin:
 

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Thanks WereBo bit by bit I will get there. I don't just want to use auto with all these features.

Some years back when I got my first (albeit point & shoot Digital) Nikon .. I headed out every night after work with my camera, tripod, Quick reference manual & a torch to various (if not frequently the same) place to take photo's & experiment .. you can't beat practice and practical experience and you will always find yourself wondering where the heck is the adjustment that you need, so a lightweight version of the manual in your pocket is a must until you get the hang of things.
 

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Thanks Wizmo and DF, unfortunately work is getting in the way of my pleasure but as you say DF I will practice and experiment when I get this work out of the way. I did find time this afternoon to order a bag for the camera and a Circular polarising lens filter. The bag will be handy so that when I am out walking I can bring my camera and play with it.
 

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Thanks WereBo bit by bit I will get there. I don't just want to use auto with all these features.
I'm slowly working my way through the various 'Auto' settings just to get a base-line' on what this camera can do and what it's (if any) weaknesses are - I can then (hopefully) adjust/compensate for them manually.

The fireworks photos that I posted earlier were all taken using the 'Fireworks' mode auto-settings, I'm well happy with the results so any further displays can be set to auto, leaving me time to frame the shots.
 
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