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Hi all.

I currently use the "TP-Link TL-PA8033PKIT AV1300 3-Port Gigabit Passthrough". Sometimes I get 100mb/s speed, but more and more often I get slumps of 1mb/s (this has been happening for a few weeks now). My other devices work (phone,laptop,TV) fine but my PC in particular has been awful! I can list some of the things I have tried so I don't get recommeneded the same things:
Turn it off and on again? .. yes!
Different adapater? I switched a BrosTrend AC1200 AC3 wifi adapter instead of the TP link, and it's exactly the same if not worse.
Driver issue? I re-installed the network driver and motherboard driver, and after that didn't work I clean reset the whole system.

My specs are attached as a picture, my motherboard is a B450 aurous pro.

Thanks for all suggestions in advance!
 

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Global Moderator
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No mystery here, those powerline adapters are infamous for lousy performance! I suspect you'll be able to do a lot better with a WiFi repeater. I have a box of those, various brands, various vintages, none of them have been speed demons. As you say, sometimes you'll get acceptable performance, other times you'll be in the dirt, or not have a connection at all. It's all dependent on the power line routing, as well as the path between the two devices.

If you connect two of them to the same outlet, they work great. It's only if you try to use them for real-world applications that they turn to beetle dung! ;)

I once again tried some of these a couple years ago in my new house. I finally gave up and I'm using the Google WiFi mesh network, that works much better than any of the powerline adapters.
 

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Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
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I agree. The only thing I've ever done with powerline adapters is throw them in the trash. There is no dirtier way to set up a network and what you're experiencing is the norm. Hard wire everything you can, use hard-wired wireless access points or try extender/repeaters if you really have to.
 

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TSF Moderator , Hardware Team , Networking Team
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A hotspot is okay if you have an unlimited, un-metered data plan. It's quite a bit slower though. My 4G LTE fluxuates around 20 Mbps, whereas my home FIOS internet is up around 850. As far as I know it is also not limited or metered.
 

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My FIOS is unmetered, but I get good speeds with the Google WiFi mesh network off the FIOS.

Google WiFI Test to my Galaxy S21 G5, Google WiFi mesh network
Atmosphere Sky Purple Handwriting Organism


Direct wire to FIOS, competing with grandson gaming and two streaming TV's.
Font Screenshot Multimedia Electronic device Electric blue


If I'm ever without FIOS, my phone with 5G is a decent hotspot, this is with WiFi disabled on the phone, I could live with that until the fiber comes back. ;)

Purple Font Violet Electric blue Science
 
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We are using TP-Link Ethernet adapters over the 52-year-old wiring in our house for the work at home office (power panel in the garage replaced in 2013 with all-new circuit breakers). I was expecting the worst, but they have worked better than ANY Wi-Fi solution that's reasonably affordable (I have AX3200 at the Wi-Fi Router and up to 4 simultaneous active devices... more than 4 active devices share antennas). Speedtest returns ~300 Mbps in the office over the AC wiring. Our internet service is 400 Mbps but usually indicates 450 Mbps on Speedtest via Ethernet. We also use a TP-Link Wi-Fi extender to the family room for TV and a computer. The Ethernet-over-AC-Power devices were something like $70 for 2. A GOOD mesh system is close to $300 by comparison and that only got up 250-300 Mbps so roughly similar performance from the 2 options, but much cheaper to do it with the TP-Link Ethernet over AC Power devices.

You don't have to be "all Wi-Fi" or "all Ethernet" -- you can use both to their full potential. My desktop is in the room with the cable modem and Ethernet/Wi-Fi router and runs Ethernet. That gives me 100% of the 400 Mbps speed we are paying for. There are probably 20-ish devices in the house on Wi-Fi, 5 devices running Ethernet and 4 devices running on Ethernet over AC-Power. This includes smart home devices like light switches/dimmers, mobile devices, light bulbs, home theater components, door bell, etc.
 

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We are using TP-Link Ethernet adapters over the 52-year-old wiring in our house for the work at home office (power panel in the garage replaced in 2013 with all-new circuit breakers). I was expecting the worst, but they have worked better than ANY Wi-Fi solution that's reasonably affordable
There's an exception to every rule, and I suspect you've just found it. I've tried these (multiple brands) in a variety of situations and at least half a dozen locations. They've never been worth a hoot for any distance. They worked great when in the same room, but that's it.
 
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