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Discussion Starter #1
So, my PC currently has 2x 500GB SATA HDD set up in RAID0 as one virtual 1TB drive. The plan is to replace these with 1x 500GB SSD (for Windows and program files) and 1x 1TB HDD for user files.

The plan is to:
Copy the my documents folders onto the new HDD.
Clone everything else onto the SSD.
Swap new drives for old.
Tell the PC where to find the new my documents folders.
Sit back and relax with a cup of tea.

Am I making this too simplistic in my mind? What have I not thought of? In particular, will the current RAID setup cause any problems. I don't want RAID after the swap.

Thanks
 

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Firstly, before you break your RAID 0 array, backup any data you deem valuable. Once you break your RAID you loose your data.

Next, for the clone part.....the data on the RAID can't exceed the the capacity of the SSD.

It's a sound plan.....but it's a lot of work.

If I was going about this....I would backup any data on the RAID I wanted to keep, then wipe the array (format), then break the array and remove both HDD's. Install SSD and do a clean install. Then reattach HDD's and set them up how ever you want to use them.
 

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I too would do a clean install onto the SSD and then restore any files/programs I needed from the backup.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, look like the consensus is to:
Back up the existing data
Format the existing HDD (or if not using them in the new set-up just keep them as a hard system restore if all else fails?)
Swap for the blank SSD
Reinstall Windows & programs
Add in the new HDD - presumably this will just show as a separate new drive in My Computer
Bring back the personal data from the backup.

One thing I want clarify, Bassfisher6522 said "break the array" - I assume this means remove the RAID0 configuration but not sure how this is done.
 

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The plan is to replace these with 1x 500GB SSD (for Windows and program files) and 1x 1TB HDD for user files.
A RAID 0 configuration is 2 HDD's spanned together as one big HDD. If one HDD fails, or is removed, the array is Broken there is no redundancy except your backup. So there is no point with a Home PC in doing a RAID array except if you want to use two smaller drives as one large one.
Manually Backup all personal User Files (ie) Documents, Pictures, Music etc, from the RAID Array C: drive to a separate USB or internal HDD. Remove the 2x 500GB HDD's and replace them with 1x 500GB SSD.
Boot off Windows install media, choose your Language, then Custom Install, and go Next. Windows will create partitions and format them during the install. the 1x 500GB will easily accommodate Windows and Programs After Windows is installed, attach the new 1x TB HDD
You then can move all of your User files (ie) Pictures, Music, Documents etc to the new 1x TB HDD.
How to Change the Location of User Folders in Windows 10 - dummies
Then restore your backup to the new location of the User Files on the new 1x TB HDD.
 

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So there is no point with a Home PC in doing a RAID array except if you want to use two smaller drives as one large one.
This is incorrect, RAID 0 will lead to a good improvement with the Disk performance with faster read/write speeds and the parity used does not slow the disks in anyway.

However you're paying twice the cost of the HDD for about ~10-20% increase in speed (probably more improvement with applications which use Hard disk intensive operations) and a single hard drive crash will lead to complete loss of data.

You should go with bassfisher's recommendation because the SSD would beat the RAID 0 performance hands down and unless that 10-20% performance is what you're looking for, it's a bad investment to keep the RAID 0 and you're better off breaking the array into 2 disks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks,
Will the PC try to create a RAID array again once the 2nd hard drive appears, i.e. does anything in the system settings need to change so that the PC knows that I no longer want to use RAID, or will the new blank disk and windows install reset this preference?
 

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Most likely RAID is configured in the BIOS, some times RAID can be configured from within the OS, but this works for Mirroring..

So, first step, backup anything and everything you can before you venture out into breaking RAID.

There will be a RAID console, you can either enter through the BIOS or it would have a separate hotkey to boot into the RAID console. You will have to go there and turn off/break RAID settings, if you're able to get to this menu and provide us a screenshot we can tell you which options to choose.

Once the array is broken, you need to reinstall Windows completely since it's being striped. So plan for a good format reinstall of windows.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry for the slow reply, been on holiday for a couple of weeks.

I guess this is the BIOS screen that you are referring to and I need to change from "RAID on" to "RAID Autodetect / ATA"
 

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