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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. For the past year and a half, I've been plagued by random errors and crashes. Last year, I upgraded to Windows 7 64-bit from Windows XP. When I was running XP, I blue-screened almost every day, no matter what I was doing. After I upgraded, the blue-screens stopped and my games ran fine with the occasional hiccup. That is, up until about four months ago. My games began to crash more frequently and now it's at the point where I can't play most of my games for more than a few minutes.

I've tried upgrading my video driver and downloading an earlier version of DirectX. Neither helped at all.

I've tried swapping my video card. It worked for a bit, but now it's back to normal.

The only things that seems to be consistent are the additional information sections:
Additional Information 1: 0a9e
Additional Information 2: 0a9e372d3b4ad19135b953a78882e789
Additional Information 3: 0a9e
Additional Information 4: 0a9e372d3b4ad19135b953a78882e789

I downloaded and ran DriverScanner, but when I tried to search for the new drivers (One for RAM and one for my motherboard) all I got were "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" threads.

My rig is:

OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
Motherboard: XFX nForce 750i SLI
CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo 2.93Ghz
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce 9500 GT
RAM: 3 GB

Any help would be much appreciated.

-Tim
 

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It's not recommended that you use a 3rd-party software to look for drivers for you. Often they will recommend or install outdated drivers or even bad drivers that are not related to your exact piece of hardware. Your best bet is to simply go to the OEM's website (Dell, Acer, HP, etc.) and download and install the appropriate drivers there. If your PC is custom-built, you'll have to go to the manufacturer's website for each piece of hardware and download and install from there.

Anyways, send us a JCGriff Report and we can go from there. If you suspect a driver problem is involved in this, you can turn on Driver Verifier.

Btw, on a completely unrelated note, that's unusual to have that beefed up of a PC but only 3 GB of RAM. I figured this is from the fact that Windows XP maxes out at around 3.25 GB, yes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Here's that report. Thanks for responding so quickly.

Yeah, I didn't start with too much RAM. I was planning getting more lately, but with all the errors, I've decided to hold off a bit in case I need to replace anything.

Also- my power supply is DiabloTek 400 Watt and the video card I'm using is an NVIDIA GeForce 8400 GS.
 

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Ok, I'm not sure why I figured this may have been drivers given that this has been going on for a year and you replaced the OS. Guess I was just tired.

Anyways, What few recent crashdumps you do have point to CPU errors. They vary in either bus errors or instruction cache read errors. Either way, this is looking a lot like your CPU is frizzled. While I would typically have you check for temperatures, that may not help you here. If the CPU has been suffering this for over a year, permanent damage would've already developed on the CPU, and no amount of cooling would stave off the instability.

However, upon looking at the name of the PSU you have, I immediately shifted my suspicions from the CPU to your PSU. Pretty much, you get what you pay for in purchasing a cheap PSU. Diablotek is a cheap brand for PSUs, and usually people buy cheaper PSUs for their builds because they assume that PSUs are not crucial to their setup. Then they end up wondering why there are so many unusual problems occurring with their PC.

PSU issues are notorious for showing up as problems with other hardware. Since the PSU is essentially the heart of the PC body, it would make sense to pay extra care (and a little extra dollar) to make sure that it is a reliable piece. If it is not, it will cause unusual problems which typically cannot be traced, and even worse, it can cause irreparable damage to the rest of your components. Cheap brands like DiabloTEK and Rosewill are notorious for failures resulting in permanently damaged PC hardware.

We have an extensive article on what to look for in a PSU located here, which also has recommended brands and models for particular price ranges. The PSU is by far the most important element to a PC's integrity, and it is wise to spend more to make sure that it makes the PC run well.

Oh, and I also want to add that a 400W PSU will not bode well with an SLI setup. Again, these details are contained in the article. Lastly, while replacing the PSU with something more reliable may resolve your problems once and for all, don't bet on it. You've been using an unstable PSU for a loooong time, and if it has been the source of your woes all this time, then there is no doubt that some other parts of your PC have gone down with it.
 
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