Tech Support Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Re: New tab

There you are. I lost you after Corday closed the other thread. Wonder why? Hmmm!!!

Anyway, you can't change the color of the plus sign itself. That is an icon that's buried in the program files.
You can, however, change the color of the tab it's on.
Code:
.tabs-newtab-button {
-moz-appearance:none !important;
background-color:#66FFFF !important;
}
I set it for the light faded cyan you were using but you can change the color code to what you prefer.
I would put that in the toolbar style so all your main toolbar CSS is together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Re: New tab

It's occured to me that you are just not understanding how CSS code works.
If you are going to keep modifying things, you really should learn what the different parts of the code do.

To that end, here is a short (relatively) Primer of what things mean and do.

I'll use the menubar code we were doing as an example.

/*change the color of the menubar*/
#toolbar-menubar {
-moz-appearance:none !important;
background-color:#DCDCDC !important;
}

The block of code can be broken down into three parts.

Part 1 is the comment section.
That's the part that begins with /* and ends with */.
Anything placed between the /* and */ will not affect the code.
This part is only for your information so you know what the code is for.

Part 2 is what you are trying to make changes to.
In this example it's the toolbar-menubar.
This is probably the hardest part as you need to find the specific ID (what it's called by the program) of the element you are working on.

Part 3 is what you want to do with the element you defined in part 2.
This part makes changes to specific parts of the element.
This part is bracketed with { }.
Only things between the brackets will have an effect on the element.

If you're changing colors the first line after the opening bracket { can usually be -moz-appearance: none !important; to cancel any defaults for the element.

You can follow that with specific changes, in this case it's background-color:#DCDCDC !important;
To break down what the line does, the first part to the colon ":" is the element part you're changing. background-color:
The next part is the change itself, the actual color #DCDCDC.
The line ends with !important; to set the change as a priority over anything else that may have an effect on that part of the element.

Any part of the element defined in Part 2 of the code can be modified in this section as long as you put it between the brackets { }.
That includes such things as font, color, size of the element, borders, margin, and padding.
For example, if you want to increase the size of the element, you would add padding to it.
The line would look like padding: 2px !important; which would add 2 pixels of space all the way around the element.


That's a pretty simplistic explanation of how a block of CSS code works, but hopefully it will give you a better understanding of what you're actually doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Re: New tab

Well, I copied the whole code and no luck. Although, what it did was put color in the lines of that box. Also, here is the thing when I put my mouse on it the opaque goes away and it goes white. Forgot to mention that when I post it first, sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
Re: New tab

OK. I think I've got it.
The developers imaged the background in FF4.
Give this a try.
Code:
.tabs-newtab-button {
-moz-appearance:none !important;
background-image:none !important; 
background-color:#66FFFF !important;
}
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top