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Discussion Starter #1
Whats the difference between DSL and ADSL?

Why was I told I couldn't use a ADSL??



*If this should be meged with my original thread (to which I now consider resolved until further notice :wink: then please merge or tell me and i'll merge..thanx.
 

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Nothing really. Most DSL links are really ADSL links. ADSL is considered "new" technology by many.

DSL = Digital Subscriber Line
ADSL = Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line ie. 512 kbps up/ 1.5 Mbps down. Different upload vs. download speeds.

Who is telling you that you cannot use ADSL? If it is Verizon in the US, this may be due to their Fiber Optic roll out. The only reason you typically cannot use DSL/ADSL is the local telco doesn't have the equipment to offer or support it or you are too far (in telephone wire distance) from the Telco Central Office to support it and/or there is line conditioning equipment which blocks the DSL signals.

JamesO
 

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ADSL may be asymetric (different upload and download speeds), but there's no law that says it has to be. In other words, you can have an ADSL connection with identical upload and download speeds. I know because I had one for years.

There is also SDSL, which means "Symmetric" DSL. It's not only symmetric in nature (always the same up and down speeds AFAIK), but it uses a different protocol and different modems than ADSL. If memory serves, SDSL works at longer distances but is sometimes more expensive, probably because it's less popular.

Note that people use "DSL" as a shorthand for either ADSL or SDSL. There may be other variants as well.

I'd also like to know the answer to James' last questions.

- The Inspector
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ah.. well.. this is how the dilemma started.

I bought a ADSL wireless...

When I come to fit it, my ISP and the guy at PC world said I couldn't use it with my Motorola SB5100. Why - because the internet is provided via coax into the modem.

I think they assumed I was wishing to replace my modem, and pass the coax into the router.. But I wasn't. I'm going to keep the modem and it's connect. But Ethernet the modem to the router, router to the pc, and wireless a laptop... The logic works to me.. but other people telling me different things through me completely off track!!!

Since my knowledge of networking is only 'theory' based, and not hands on technical based... I didn't know what to think... whether to trust my instinct - or follow advice..

Thanks for the insite... Now i know the pc world guy was talking tripe...
 

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POADB said:
Ah.. well.. this is how the dilemma started.

I bought a ADSL wireless...

When I come to fit it, my ISP and the guy at PC world said I couldn't use it with my Motorola SB5100. Why - because the internet is provided via coax into the modem.

I think they assumed I was wishing to replace my modem, and pass the coax into the router.. But I wasn't. I'm going to keep the modem and it's connect. But Ethernet the modem to the router, router to the pc, and wireless a laptop... The logic works to me.. but other people telling me different things through me completely off track!!!

Since my knowledge of networking is only 'theory' based, and not hands on technical based... I didn't know what to think... whether to trust my instinct - or follow advice..

Thanks for the insite... Now i know the pc world guy was talking tripe...
Like I said in the other thread, unless you're buying a router that includes a ADSL modem, they're all generic to either ADSL/DSL/cable, and will work with any broadband account. The router you were looking for is a generic router, and it even stated it was for DSL or cable.
 
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