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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

My MQ04ABF100 Toshiba SATA 1TB HDD on the Acer Nitro 5 AN515-53 seems to be failing and I am planning on getting a new hard drive sometime.

Right now I am debating on two options at a budget price:

Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SATA 2.5" Internal SSD Hard Drive (MZ-77E250B/AM) [Canada Version]: Amazon.ca: Computers & Tablets $57.99 250GB SATA

Or

WD_Black SN750 500GB NVMe Internal Gaming SSD - Gen3 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND - WDS500G3X0C: Amazon.ca: Computers & Tablets

Planning on buying the new and used $69.74 500GB PCIe

I read that NVMe requires a heatsink for longevity if your motherboard doesn't support it, I don't think the AN515-53 does. Do I really need a heatsink if I wanted to use the NVMe for a long time?

Having an SSD will already increase my performance, but if I wanted to have it for 5+ years, which drive should I get? I hardly have any files other than one game a time downloaded so I don't really care much for space.

Is it worth it to buy the NVMe at a used price or generally is it not worth the risk at all? Would the SATA SSD be better for reliability and life?
 

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Team Manager, Microsoft Support
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Don't buy used. NVMe needing heatsink was partially true, but doesn't apply to current hardware. Either SSD OK. I would go higher end, but don't know your budget.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Don't buy used. NVMe needing heatsink was partially true, but doesn't apply to current hardware. Either SSD OK. I would go higher end, but don't know your budget.
Thanks, in that case I think I'll stick to the SATA SSD, in general does it last longer?
Also what do you mean by current hardware?
 

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Team Manager, Microsoft Support
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I mean what's available now as opposed to the outdated stuff around when possibly the heatsink was needed.
 
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Team Manager, Microsoft Support
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Can't hurt.
 

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TSF Moderator , Hardware Team , Networking Team
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Wikipedia > SSD > Comparison with other technologies
Reliability – longevity

SSDs have no moving parts to fail mechanically so in theory, should be more reliable than HDDs. However, in practice this is unclear.

Each block of a flash-based SSD can only be erased (and therefore written) a limited number of times before it fails. The controllers manage this limitation so that drives can last for many years under normal use. SSDs based on DRAM do not have a limited number of writes. However the failure of a controller can make an SSD unusable. Reliability varies significantly across different SSD manufacturers and models with return rates reaching 40% for specific drives. Many SSDs critically fail on power outages; a December 2013 survey of many SSDs found that only some of them are able to survive multiple power outages. A Facebook study found that sparse data layout across an SSD's physical address space (e.g., non-contiguously allocated data), dense data layout (e.g., contiguous data) and higher operating temperature (which correlates with the power used to transmit data) each lead to increased failure rates among SSDs.

However, SSDs have undergone many revisions that have made them more reliable and long lasting. New SSDs in the market today use power loss protection circuits, wear leveling techniques and thermal throttling to ensure longevity.
 
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