Tech Support banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Moderator - Games Team , Articles Team
Joined
·
6,117 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, got some server questions. I'm planning to get the Lenovo ST550 for my dad's CPA office. It'll be supporting 5-10 workstations and I'm planning to install Windows Server 2019 Essentials on it and only need about 2TB of storage. My question is, what drives would you guys recommend? I'm thinking two of these: Samsung PM883 960GB 3D TLC SATA 6Gb/s 2.5-Inch Enterprise SSD - MZ7LH960HAJR-00005 MZ-7LH9600 - Newegg.com

I believe it has 2 M.2 slots available as well. [Lenovo ThinkSystem ST550 7X10A0APNA 4U Tower Server - 1 x Xeon Bronze 3204 - 16 GB RAM HDD SSD - 12Gb/s SAS, Serial ATA/600 Controller - Newegg.com](https://www.newegg.com/p/2NS-000M-05FF4?Item=9SIA6ZPA4G1294)

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Hey guys, got some server questions. I'm planning to get the Lenovo ST550 for my dad's CPA office. It'll be supporting 5-10 workstations and I'm planning to install Windows Server 2019 Essentials on it and only need about 2TB of storage. My question is, what drives would you guys recommend? I'm thinking two of these: Samsung PM883 960GB 3D TLC SATA 6Gb/s 2.5-Inch Enterprise SSD - MZ7LH960HAJR-00005 MZ-7LH9600 - Newegg.com

I believe it has 2 M.2 slots available as well. [Lenovo ThinkSystem ST550 7X10A0APNA 4U Tower Server - 1 x Xeon Bronze 3204 - 16 GB RAM HDD SSD - 12Gb/s SAS, Serial ATA/600 Controller - Newegg.com](https://www.newegg.com/p/2NS-000M-05FF4?Item=9SIA6ZPA4G1294)

Thanks!
Nice! You have patience for wanting to understand the ins and outs of windows group policy. If you’re planning on running just storage it will probably work fine. I would definitely use raid arrays that can rebuild itself when a hard drive fails. That should be built into the bios, if that’s still around. So you just swap in a new drive and raid will rebuild the drive. This is just for storage. If you want to run vm’s and automate operating systems installations there is another machine for that.
 

·
Moderator - Games Team , Articles Team
Joined
·
6,117 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Nice! You have patience for wanting to understand the ins and outs of windows group policy. If you’re planning on running just storage it will probably work fine. I would definitely use raid arrays that can rebuild itself when a hard drive fails. That should be built into the bios, if that’s still around. So you just swap in a new drive and raid will rebuild the drive. This is just for storage. If you want to run vm’s and automate operating systems installations there is another machine for that.
Thanks, Christoph! I've already dabbled in Group Policy a bit, setting up workstations. I'm going to have a local IT shop do the integration and migration from the old server, I just wanted to make sure this would work. The old one is running dual Xeon 5160s, Windows Server 2008, and 16GB of old (probably DDR2) RAM, so I think this one should be quite a bit better and also have good upgrade options as well.
 

·
Microsoft MVP, Microsoft Team Moderator, Articles
Joined
·
39,553 Posts
I don't see the reason to go for an SSD. Assuming that the drives are for a network share amongst the users, I'd go with two of these and follow the RAID advice above.

 

·
Moderator , - Microsoft Support
Joined
·
5,159 Posts
I'd echo some of what's been said. Storage drives don't really need SSD, but the operating system "can" benefit from them if there are apps installed (I think of Time Slips or WinForms) since they can do some work on the server. I have legal office clients and most are perfectly fine running a good standard HD (7200 RPM not 5400 RPM) in a RAID 1 (mirrored) array. Yes, you could use a RAID 5, but your drive costs go up and if the array truly tanks, they can be a pain to rebuild without impeccable back-ups. Again, it's about easy of management, especially if you're not seasoned on the nuances of server hardware and software. If a drive fails in a RAID 1 array, simply shutdown, replace the failed drive, turn on the PC, and enter the RAID configuration page. You'll likely already see that the drive has been detected and usually there's a simple button to rebuild. IF they want to run some kind of dedicated box for an application, Hyper-V can do it on that hardware if the demands are minimal. I would think of something like Quickbooks Enterprise being hosted on that would work fine. The heavier the load, the more you'll want to consider going with the standard server edition and not essentials, although if you like the essentials interface you can enable the "essentials experience" in the standard version of windows server to get those menus/tools.

Just my $.02. One thing that can't be stressed enough is BACKUP, BACKUP, BACKUP your data. From the most entry level to enterprise grade, there's no substitute for backing up. Something like CrashPlan or iDrive will save your behind in the event of catastrophic failure. The key is data, the OS can be reinstalled, but the data will take man hours to replicate if not backed up properly.
 

·
Moderator - Games Team , Articles Team
Joined
·
6,117 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I don't see the reason to go for an SSD. Assuming that the drives are for a network share amongst the users, I'd go with two of these and follow the RAID advice above.

The reason I went with SSDs is that we do have programs hosted on the server, Quickbooks, Lacerte, Office Tools Workspace, etc., and I was thinking SSDs would make those snappier.

I'd echo some of what's been said. Storage drives don't really need SSD, but the operating system "can" benefit from them if there are apps installed (I think of Time Slips or WinForms) since they can do some work on the server. I have legal office clients and most are perfectly fine running a good standard HD (7200 RPM not 5400 RPM) in a RAID 1 (mirrored) array. Yes, you could use a RAID 5, but your drive costs go up and if the array truly tanks, they can be a pain to rebuild without impeccable back-ups. Again, it's about easy of management, especially if you're not seasoned on the nuances of server hardware and software. If a drive fails in a RAID 1 array, simply shutdown, replace the failed drive, turn on the PC, and enter the RAID configuration page. You'll likely already see that the drive has been detected and usually there's a simple button to rebuild. IF they want to run some kind of dedicated box for an application, Hyper-V can do it on that hardware if the demands are minimal. I would think of something like Quickbooks Enterprise being hosted on that would work fine. The heavier the load, the more you'll want to consider going with the standard server edition and not essentials, although if you like the essentials interface you can enable the "essentials experience" in the standard version of windows server to get those menus/tools.

Just my $.02. One thing that can't be stressed enough is BACKUP, BACKUP, BACKUP your data. From the most entry level to enterprise grade, there's no substitute for backing up. Something like CrashPlan or iDrive will save your behind in the event of catastrophic failure. The key is data, the OS can be reinstalled, but the data will take man hours to replicate if not backed up properly.
Thanks for the info. We do have apps installed on the server such as Quickbooks, Lacerte, Office Tools Workspace, and others (although we got rid of Timeslips a long time ago 😁) which is why I went with SSDs. We have a local tech shop who manage the server and will do most of the setup, I just wanted to get the system myself as they were wanting $15k to build one. I believe the current setup is a RAID 1 and we are backed up to the tech shops system as well as external drives that are swapped daily. (We lost a ton of data a few years back due to a program failure and the owner, my dad, said nope, not again). But that's good advice.
 

·
Microsoft MVP, Microsoft Team Moderator, Articles
Joined
·
39,553 Posts
The reason I went with SSDs is that we do have programs hosted on the server, Quickbooks, Lacerte, Office Tools Workspace, etc., and I was thinking SSDs would make those snappier.
File hosted or running as RemoteApp? File hosted wouldn't make it feel snappier, but the SSD route of course doesn't hurt. Just wanted to state publicly it's not needed.
 

·
Moderator - Games Team , Articles Team
Joined
·
6,117 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
File hosted or running as RemoteApp? File hosted wouldn't make it feel snappier, but the SSD route of course doesn't hurt. Just wanted to state publicly it's not needed.
File hosted I believe.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top