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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Seagate Archive HDD (Seagate (STEB8000100) Expansion Desktop 8TB External Hard Drive HDD – USB 3.0 for PC Laptop). It was in an external enclosure. I have several external hard drives including a WD. I may have accidently used my WD power adapter for my Seagate Archive HDD. Nevertheless, my Seagate Archive HDD is no longer working.

I bought several of these Expansion Drives. I opened another one and it is a Seagate Barracuda instead of a Seagate Archive HDD. I was just hoping to have a Donor for parts but no luck there.

I went ahead and ordered from an online website the exact match PCB boards to see if I can get this hard drive working by myself. I am not looking forward to sending this off to a Data Recovery Service, but I am thinking about it.

If someone could help me troubleshoot this a little beforehand to see if I can get this working without having to send it off that would be greatly appreciated.

Here are my thoughts.

The drive is completely silent, there was never a horrific ending to the drive. Like it is spinning up and crashing, knocking, beeping, whatever. Just one day I plugged it in and nothing.

Now here is the odd part. It seems like something is barely connecting because in keeps connecting and discounting in windows. You hear the Windows Notification that it connects and then disconnects. Sometimes it stays connected and you can see in “Computer Management” under “Disk Management” the drive. It is like it is barely connected on a sub low level.

What will happen is that in “Disk Management” a window will pop up and say you must initialize a disk before Logical Disk Manager can access it. MBR vs GPT. Of course, after doing this, I get the error “The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error”.

Disk 2, red down arrow, Unknown, Not Initialized

Most of the time the partition data or the available space does not show up in disk management, but rarely it does show up, i.e., size of partition and available space to create a disk partition. However, even when that shows up it still gives me the error “The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error”.

My thoughts are that the drive is fully functional, but I may have blown a diode or something. The hard drive was sitting in an enclosure and had an extra PCB Board that was a bridge between the power supply and the hard drive. This other PCB board on the external enclosure is working perfectly. I popped out another Hard Drive from another enclosure used it on the bridge and everything works perfectly. So, I am not sure how the Seagate Archive HDD failed even when the External PCB power supply which held it did not.

This is what leads me to be that somehow the PCB Board is no longer working on the Seagate Archive HDD and this may be a simple solution. I ordered a new PCB Donor Board and was hoping all I must do is transfer the “Bios” and install the new Donor Board and everything works.

My question is troubleshooting.

Before messing around with my vital “Bios” chip. Can I just swap out my Donor Board to just see if power is restored and the drive spins up? I know I will not be able to access the Data however, I would be able to confirm that my other original PCB board is the main culprit. Then proceed to swapping the “Bios” chip on the Donor Board.

Will swapping the PCB board without swapping the “Bios” chip cause any “Data” loss or damage the Seagate Archive HDD?

Troubleshooting Steps

-1 Order Donor PCB Board
-2 Swap Original Board with Donor Board without Swapping Bios Chip
-3 See if Seagate Archive HDD powers on whatsoever, spins, etc.
-4 If powers on and spins up, swap out Bios Chip
-5 If Bios Chip is swapped and drive is still not responsive begin consultation with “Data Recovery Service”.

Another question is do I simply just send this off to a “Data Recovery Service” I would hate to swap out my Bios chip and make it more difficult for them to recover. However, if it is a simple PCB Board Swap and Bios Swap, I would prefer to do it myself.

Please feel free to give me any other pointers. I am just trying to perform some basic troubleshooting tactics before sending this drive off for an expensive recovery. I just have a feeling that this might be as simple as a PCB Board/Bios swap because the drive was never dropped, and in perfect condition. It is not that old either.

Thanks!
 

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It could be anything from a minor connection problem to the disc is so far gone, only a very high end pro can recover the data or anything in between.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It could be anything from a minor connection problem to the disc is so far gone, only a very high end pro can recover the data or anything in between.
So do you think I should try to see if it is a minor connection problem? Maybe simply replace the PCB board and swap out the BIOS chip. If that fails send it off to a "Data Recovery Service"?

Or are you saying send it off now and don't even try?
 

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Sometimes the problem lies with the little USB-to-SATA adapter that's in the enclosure. To test, remove the drive from the enclosure, (unplug the seperate adapter if applicable), then attach it directly to a motherboard and power supply like you would any other HDD. Then when you power the computer up, go into the BIOS to see if the computer can see it. If not, there is no software that will be able to see it until the BIOS can.

As far as data recovery services go, Ontrack. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sometimes the problem lies with the little USB-to-SATA adapter that's in the enclosure. To test, remove the drive from the enclosure, (unplug the seperate adapter if applicable), then attach it directly to a motherboard and power supply like you would any other HDD. Then when you power the computer up, go into the BIOS to see if the computer can see it. If not, there is no software that will be able to see it until the BIOS can.

As far as data recovery services go, Ontrack. (y)
Yes, I did that. I have a few of these and took a couple of them out of their external cases. A good drive works on both controllers and in another USB Tower Case. The bad drive does not work with any of the controllers or the USB Tower Case.

I need to find a separate sata power cable and data cable because both of my cards are m.2 and build onto my motherboard. My other computers are laptops. Let me see if I can get to my power supply, everything is so tight in my pc. If I can see it in my bios and its the correct avaiable disk space what does that mean, platter frozen? If I don't see it, it means it might be the PCB board?
 

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Yes, I did that. I have a few of these and took a couple of them out of their external cases. A good drive works on both controllers and in another USB Tower Case. The bad drive does not work with any of the controllers or the USB Tower Case.
Yeppirs, that does sounds like a dead drive then. :(

I need to find a separate sata power cable and data cable because both of my cards are m.2 and build onto my motherboard. My other computers are laptops. Let me see if I can get to my power supply, everything is so tight in my pc.

If I can see it in my bios and its the correct avaiable disk space what does that mean, platter frozen? If I don't see it, it means it might be the PCB board?
1) The BIOS usually only shows the name of the drive, (which it gets from querying the drive itself), and nothing else.

2) It could be anything in between the HDD platters and the motherboard (and PSU).

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You can't simply replace the circuit board because there are tuning parameters in your original circuit board that are required for your drive to read.
You will need access to
the correct equipment to transfer the tuning parameters over to the new circuit board ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeppirs, that does sounds like a dead drive then. :(






1) The BIOS usually only shows the name of the drive, (which it gets from querying the drive itself), and nothing else.

2) It could be anything in between the HDD platters and the motherboard (and PSU).

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You will need access to
Yeah, probably a dead drive. I'm checking on those cables. I have a huge video card, wonder if I could steal some power from that with an adapter power cable verses taking my whole pc apart to get to the power supply. I bet the drive might show up on the BIOS but I don't know that yet. HDD platter maybe, motherboard as in PC or PCB board? PSU? Computer PSU? I have tried this drive on a laptop and a desktop and its doing the same thing on both. I'll check out that site and start doing my research on where to send my drive to. Thanks for the recommendation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay, I finally connected the bad drive directly to my motherboard to see if I could see it in my BIOS. Nothing. Can't see a thing. I connected one of the good drives and I could see it perfectly in my BIOS including the size of the partition. So how I can see this bad drive in Windows under Disk Management connected via a usb controller but I can't see it in my BIOS. When it is connected in Windows I can't do anything with it because it wont initialize, but something is connected. Oh wait a minute, I think windows is seeing the USB Controller and the USB Controller is telling windows something is here, however, when windows goes to access the drive through the controller there is no response. Honestly, what I am thinking is that this bad drive is getting zero power. I mean when I hooked up the good drive it immediately powered up and you could hear everything working, spinning, etc. When I hook up the bad drive, absolutely nothing happens, as if the drive never turned on. I think all the confusion is the USB Controller that was enclosed in the External Case is what is causing all of these confusion problems. If I connect the bad drive to the motherboard directly, zero, zilch, nothing. I don't feel anything, no spin, no clunking, not even it attempting to turn on.

What does this mean? Possible bad PCB Board? Or the Drive more than like Seized? I would think that if the drive seized you would hear it power up some and try to do this and that. I am more incline to think the PCB is dead and nothing power/information/commands are even getting to the hard drive.

What do you think?
 

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What I think is it's simply dead and needs to be replaced. All hard drives will die.

Exactly what, where and why died on the drive would cost more to find out than the drive is worth. It could be one or more items on the PCB, dead stepper motor, stuck heads, frozen platters, etc., etc.. You'd need some serious testing equipment to test each and every little part.
 

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Plug the drive into one of the power plugs from the PSU. Put your ear next to it. Does it spin up? Is it making a clicking or scraping noise, or is it cold no life?
If you want to pursue trying to fix it enough to get the data off of it, contact our resident Hard Drive expert fzabkar who can walk you thru troubleshooting steps
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Plug the drive into one of the power plugs from the PSU. Put your ear next to it. Does it spin up? Is it making a clicking or scraping noise, or is it cold no life?
If you want to pursue trying to fix it enough to get the data off of it, contact our resident Hard Drive expert fzabkar who can walk you thru troubleshooting steps
Yes, thank you. I have been working with fzabkar. He is amazing. I have turned in on and put it to my ear, nothing. I think it's the PCB Board. I hope that is all that it is.
 

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You're in good hands with fzabkar. the problem is that you have to have the proper firmware for the PCB board, not just the board.
 

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Swapping the board is easy. Finding a board with the correct Firmware is the hard part.
 

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Firmware is different then Bios. Firmware is hardware encoded from the factory and will differ from the date the board was created. fzabkar should be able to assist you further from here on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Another Update:

I just got my Donor Board. The drive spun right up and sounds great, no crashes or nasty sounds. It does try twice to read and then gives up so I think there is where swapping out the BIOS is going to work, right? I'll go ahead an order a rework station now to perform the procedure.
 

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Firmware is different then Bios. Firmware is hardware encoded from the factory and will differ from the date the board was created. fzabkar should be able to assist you further from here on.
You are confusing the BIOS, which stands for Basic Input Output System, which is software stored on a small memory chip on the motherboard of a computer, and the Firmware, which is a software program embedded on the PCB by the HDD Manufacturer at the factory. You can try to update the firmware from this link Seagate Technology - Download Finder Unless fzabkar has a better idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You are confusing the BIOS, which stands for Basic Input Output System, which is software stored on a small memory chip on the motherboard of a computer, and the Firmware, which is a software program embedded on the PCB by the HDD Manufacturer at the factory. You can try to update the firmware from this link Seagate Technology - Download Finder Unless fzabkar has a better idea.
I meant to say firmware PCB chip. I could swap it out with a re-work station, the chip from my original board to the donor board. However, are you saying that I could possibly copy the firmware from my bad pcb board to the new donor pcb without having to use a rework station?

I think fzabkar has given up on me. I may not be smart enough in order to work with him.
 
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