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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everybody. So in advance of building a new PC, I'm about to install a new hard drive into my old single-core computer from way back in 2004. But before I do that I want to and may need to fix a problem that's been going on for a while, and that's the focus of this topic.

Two years ago I installed a GeForce 6600 GT into this computer (Athlon XP 2800+, Asus A7V8X-X mobo, Apex/Allied AL-A350ATX 350W PSU). Everything worked fine, but I promptly got the following message on startup:

"The NVIDIA System Sentinel is reporting that the NVIDIA-powered graphics card is not receiving sufficient power.

To protect your hardware from potential damage or causing a potential system lockup, the graphics processor has lowered its performance to a level that allowed continued safe operations."


At first I was going to fix it, then later when nothing bad happened I just got used to it. It's still going on today, every time I reboot the computer.

Now I'm wondering if it's been incredibly stupid of me to leave it for so long, and I have no idea so I'm asking you guys instead. Do you think, over the two year period, it's resulted in some kind of damage? Hardware damage, file corruption, things like that? Just a guess would help.

I looked at the stickied PSU list in this forum around for replacements but I'm not sure what'll be compatible with my now old computer. Can someone please direct me to a good, more powerful PSU that will work with the computer and that won't give me these problems? Check out the stats on the Newegg page I linked to for the current PSU details. Newegg it says it has SATA connectors, but all I see are 4-pin molex ones; I have to use a SATA host controller for the HD. Oh, and like I said I want to upgrade the hard drive, so the new PSU should be able to support a WDC Black 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB 3.0Gb/s as well, if this computer even can support that HD.

One other thing. If I do upgrade to a non-error message-causing PSU, will it make the video card more powerful? The 6600 GT's message did say it had deliberately lowered its own performance level.

Any help would be much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Er, that's weird. Didn't link to the old PSU's Newegg page properly. Here it is again. Apex/Allied AL-A350ATX 350W. Oddly Newegg's description says AL-A350 but the picture says AL-B350.

Thanks for the suggestion dai. Any idea for my other questions? Is my delay likely to have caused hardware damage? Will upgrading the PSU up the video card's performance?

Oh and I was going to use a completely new video card for the new comp. But I'd still like the old comp to be usable.
 

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Most likely nothing will be damaged yet, though it would have frazzled out if you hadn't decided to get a better PSU. It won't make it perform better but it will keep things cooler. Before, my GPU was at 48C idle, and 65-70C on load. Now I upgraded my PSU, it's 41-42C idle and 55-56C load. This enables you to overclock more, or upgrade/install new things later on.
 

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Apex/Allied PSU's are a crap shoot. When cheap PSU's go, they usually take other hardware with them. Primarily CPU/Mobo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'm having a hard time determining, is the PSU dia recommended compatible with AGP video cards? Because that's what I have. Newegg says it has a PCI-E connector, doesn't mention an AGP one. Not sure if they're mutually exclusive or not.

By the way, is there some way I can determine if the key components (CPU, mobo, video card, RAM, hard drive) have been damaged? Some software, or visual cues? And, really important: if I get a new hard drive and replace the PSU but keep using other components the old PSU might have damaged, will that damage the new HD?
 

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The suggested PSU will be compatible. No connector is needed for AGP.
Look at the Mobo capacitors for swelling or leakage. Other than that you won't know of any damage until you boot it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks everyone for the responses.

Here's a stock pic of my mobo. Should I just look around all the darkish cylinders (capacitors) for leakage, etc? Anywhere particular I should focus?

BTW to Tyree, what do you mean I won't know of damage until I "boot it"? I've been using this mobo daily for years. Or do you mean the new PSU? Not sure how that would help detect mobo damage though.
 
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