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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been having regular bluescreens for some time, though they only seem to happen while gaming, and some games seem to be more bluescreen-happy than others without any apparent rhyme or reason. After numerous attempts at reinstalling and updating various drivers, I settled for formatting my HD and starting over. Unfortunately, it solved nothing and the problem persists. Any help you could offer would be great. Thanks.

OS- Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit (Full retail)
CPU- Intel Core i5 3570K
GPU- AMD Radeon HD 7800 Series
Motherboard- ASUS P8Z77-V LX
Power supply- Corsair GS800 800W
 

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TSF Team, Emeritus
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Hi,

We have two bug checks:

KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED (1e)

This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.

Code:
1: kd> .exr 0xfffff88002f1bb08
ExceptionAddress: fffff800028e0094 ([COLOR=Indigo]nt!KiIdleLoop+0x0000000000000054[/COLOR])
   ExceptionCode:[COLOR=Red] c0000005 (Access violation)[/COLOR]
The violation occurred in nt!KiIdleLoop.

Code:
MODULE_NAME: [COLOR=Red]hardware[/COLOR]

FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  X64_[COLOR=Indigo]IP_MISALIGNED[/COLOR]

BUCKET_ID:  X64_[COLOR=Indigo]IP_MISALIGNED[/COLOR]
Misaligned instruction pointer, likely faulty RAM and/or processor.

IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL (a)

This indicates that Microsoft Windows or a kernel-mode driver accessed paged memory at DISPATCH_LEVEL or above.

This bug check is issued if paged memory (or invalid memory) is accessed when the IRQL is too high. The error that generates this bug check usually occurs after the installation of a faulty device driver, system service, or BIOS.

----------------------

Please run Memtest for NO LESS than ~8 passes (several hours):

Memtest86+:

Download Memtest86+ here:

Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool

Which should I download?

You can either download the pre-compiled ISO that you would burn to a CD and then boot from the CD, or you can download the auto-installer for the USB key. What this will do is format your USB drive, make it a bootable device, and then install the necessary files. Both do the same job, it's just up to you which you choose, or which you have available (whether it's CD or USB).

Do note that some older generation motherboards do not support USB-based booting, therefore your only option is CD (or Floppy if you really wanted to).

How Memtest works:

Memtest86 writes a series of test patterns to most memory addresses, reads back the data written, and compares it for errors.

The default pass does 9 different tests, varying in access patterns and test data. A tenth test, bit fade, is selectable from the menu. It writes all memory with zeroes, then sleeps for 90 minutes before checking to see if bits have changed (perhaps because of refresh problems). This is repeated with all ones for a total time of 3 hours per pass.

Many chipsets can report RAM speeds and timings via SPD (Serial Presence Detect) or EPP (Enhanced Performance Profiles), and some even support changing the expected memory speed. If the expected memory speed is overclocked, Memtest86 can test that memory performance is error-free with these faster settings.

Some hardware is able to report the "PAT status" (PAT: enabled or PAT: disabled). This is a reference to Intel Performance acceleration technology; there may be BIOS settings which affect this aspect of memory timing.

This information, if available to the program, can be displayed via a menu option.

Any other questions, they can most likely be answered by reading this great guide here:

FAQ : please read before posting

Regards,

Patrick
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Patrick.

Just finished with the requested 8 passes in Memtest. Unfortunately no errors were found.
 

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Before I assume faulty processor, can you please enable Driver Verifier so we're sure there's no software issue:

Driver Verifier:

What is Driver Verifier?

Driver Verifier monitors Windows kernel-mode drivers, graphics drivers, and even 3rd party drivers to detect illegal function calls or actions that might corrupt the system. Driver Verifier can subject the Windows drivers to a variety of stresses and tests to find improper behavior.

Essentially, if there's a 3rd party driver believed to be causing the issues at hand, enabling Driver Verifier will help us see which specific driver is causing the problem.

Before enabling Driver Verifier, it is recommended to create a System Restore Point:

Vista - START | type rstrui - create a restore point
Windows 7 - START | type create | select "Create a Restore Point"
Windows 8/8.1 - Restore Point - Create in Windows 8

How to enable Driver Verifier:

Start > type "verifier" without the quotes > Select the following options -

1. Select - "Create custom settings (for code developers)"
2. Select - "Select individual settings from a full list"
3. Check the following boxes -
- Special Pool
- Pool Tracking
- Force IRQL Checking
- Deadlock Detection
- Security Checks (Windows 7 & 8/8.1)
- DDI compliance checking (Windows 8/8.1)
- Miscellaneous Checks
4. Select - "Select driver names from a list"
5. Click on the "Provider" tab. This will sort all of the drivers by the provider.
6. Check EVERY box that is NOT provided by Microsoft / Microsoft Corporation.
7. Click on Finish.
8. Restart.

Important information regarding Driver Verifier:

- If Driver Verifier finds a violation, the system will BSOD. To expand on this a bit more for the interested, specifically what Driver Verifier actually does is it looks for any driver making illegal function calls, causing memory leaks, etc. When and/if this happens, system corruption occurs if allowed to continue. When Driver Verifier is enabled per my instructions above, it is monitoring all 3rd party drivers (as we have it set that way) and when it catches a driver attempting to do this, it will quickly flag that driver as being a troublemaker, and bring down the system safely before any corruption can occur.

- After enabling Driver Verifier and restarting the system, depending on the culprit, if for example the driver is on start-up, you may not be able to get back into normal Windows because Driver Verifier will detect it in violation almost straight away, and as stated above, that will cause / force a BSOD.

If this happens, do not panic, do the following:

- Boot into Safe Mode by repeatedly tapping the F8 key during boot-up.

- Once in Safe Mode - Start > Search > type "cmd" without the quotes.

- To turn off Driver Verifier, type in cmd "verifier /reset" without the quotes.
・ Restart and boot into normal Windows.

If your OS became corrupt or you cannot boot into Windows after disabling verifier via Safe Mode:

- Boot into Safe Mode by repeatedly tapping the F8 key during boot-up.

- Once in Safe Mode - Start > type "system restore" without the quotes.

- Choose the restore point you created earlier.

-- Note that Safe Mode for Windows 8/8.1 is a bit different, and you may need to try different methods: 5 Ways to Boot into Safe Mode in Windows 8 & Windows 8.1

How long should I keep Driver Verifier enabled for?

I recommend keeping it enabled for at least 24 hours. If you don't BSOD by then, disable Driver Verifier. I will usually say whether or not I'd like for you to keep it enabled any longer.

My system BSOD'd with Driver Verifier enabled, where can I find the crash dumps?

- If you have the system set to generate Small Memory Dumps, they will be located in %systemroot%\Minidump.

- If you have the system set to generate Kernel-Memory Dumps, it will be located in %systemroot% and labeled MEMORY.DMP.

Any other questions can most likely be answered by this article:

Using Driver Verifier to identify issues with Windows drivers for advanced users

Regards,

Patrick
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I ran the verifier for a day but it didn't cause any blue screens. But I did notice that the cpu was reaching incredibly high temperatures. After some investigation I reapplied some thermal compound between the processor and its fan, which brought it back down considerably.

For a while it seemed that this had solved the problem, but I've had two blue screens since while gaming. It's certainly far less frequent than before, but it doesn't seem like the problem has been solved after all.
 

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The latest DMP file is of the of the 0xA0000001 bug check.


This is specifically an ATI/AMD based bug check. If we take a look at the call stack, we can see the AMD video driver called directly into the bug check as opposed to Windows going through its traditional fault handling, etc:


Code:
2: kd> k
Child-SP          RetAddr           Call Site
fffff880`08441598 fffff880`0feac7ce [COLOR=Indigo]nt!KeBugCheckEx[/COLOR]
fffff880`084415a0 00000000`a0000001 [COLOR=Red]atikmdag+0x277ce[/COLOR]
fffff880`084415a8 00000000`00000005 0xa0000001
fffff880`084415b0 00000000`00000000 0x5

1. Ensure you have the latest video card drivers via the manufacturers website (not Windows Update). If you are already on the latest video card drivers, uninstall and install a version or a few versions behind the latest to ensure it's not a latest driver only issue. If you have already experimented with the latest video card driver and many previous versions, please give the beta driver for your video card a try if available.


2. If the above fails, you have a faulty video card.


Regards,


Patrick
 
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