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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

My organization currently has only 20 people but plans to have about a total of 50 people over the next 1 year.

Will Windows 2003 be enough? Would the standard version of Windows 2003 server be enough or should we consider some enterprise version of Windows 2003? Basically we do not want to buy the O/S and later find out that only X number of users/concurrent users can use the LAN.

Will be grateful for reply and guidance.
 

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Hi….

Windows 2003 will definitely be enough depending on what your intentions are for the actual Domain.

Which version of Windows Server you will need doesn’t really apply to the number of users, but to the number of processors allowed, maximum memory allowed, and various other features that can be used depending on the versions.

You will have to purchase the user CALS regardless of which version of Windows Server you decide to go with. Of course, if you are purchasing a new server, you can usually purchase the OS and CALS along with the server. You can always add CALS later if you end up exceeding the number you have purchased originally; they are easy to add with no down time.

The different server versions can be viewed here:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc758523(WS.10).aspx

Thanks!
 

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Hi Guys,

Yes 2003 is sufficient for a massive install, of course you may want to have a couple of 2003 servers, but simply to split things up such as SQL and maybe Exchange on a different one.

We have a site which we support and they are running 7 Windows 2003 serves across 5 sites with over 1000 users, so there is not much point going for Enterprise. Just remember if you have a single server with Exchange make sure you have a good backup and backup the system state. Don't want to have to reset all the PC's to a new domain in the event of a failure!

Thanks and Best Wishes
Brian
www.it-mk.co.uk
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yup, we have 20 exchange servers, all are STD version of windows with ENT exchange.
Hi,

In view of your quoted reply, can I please request your answers to the following:

1) If I understand correctly you have mentioned ENT exchange. Does this mean that there is a standard version of MS-Exchange and then there is a Enterprise version (I am assuming that ENT means enterprise version).

2) Will the standard version of MS-Exchange support up to 40 users?

3) What are the key differences between the standard version of MS-Exchange and the Enterprise version of MS-Exhange?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies billbuss.

Can I please reqiest some more related questions:

1) What is the maximum number of user mailboxes supported on the standard version of MS-Exchange?

2) You say that standard version of MS-Exhange only offers 5 storage groups? Can you please explain what "storage groups" means? Is it something like the concept of 'distribution list" (where you define one group and can define as many members/email addresses as part of that group) so that an email sent to only 1 distribution list (i.e. 1 email address) actually gets sent to all people who are members of that distribution list

3) What is clustering and what are the benefits of clustering from MS-Exchange's view point.

Sorry for the botheration and will be very grateful for your reply again.
 

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1. no limit .. just limited to 5 storage groups
2. storage groups are where your mailbox databases go.
3. clustering allows you to have a backup server go online if the main one dies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks bilbus and my apologies for the late reply. All questions have been answered and the only point that I am still not clear about is the concept of "Storage Group". Is this the same thing as the "distribution list" concept that I talked about in my earlier post or something different???? If not, can you/someone please help me understand what the "storage group" really means.

Thanks (and my apologies for any botheration).
 

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no

a distribution group is a list of users who revice the same emails like a news letter or a department wide email message.

A storage group is a location where the email databases are stored. Storage group is a folder on your server / storage location that holds all your databases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hope you will not get irritated

Mailbox of each user can also be kind of treated as a database. Right? (Though I know that this is maybe not a good analogy). Now in my scenario we are talking about approximately 20 users; each having a mailbox/database. Does this mean that the limitations of 5 databases will somehow kick in and not all 20 users will be able to have their databases i.e. mailboxes stored on the server????

I know I am confused and you may have figured this out too. If possible, please do try to help.

Thanks
 

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From my understanding of Storage Group is that think of each storage group as a database for your mailbox's, and within each database (Storage Group), you can have a large amount of mailbox's but it depends on your hardware spec of the server, normally Storage Groups hold around 700 - 1000 Mailbox's. So in theory you can put all your users in 1 single storage group. You can then use another storage group as a back up for the 1st one and have the others spare.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks drumtech150. If this is the case then your reply really helps in understanding the storage group concept.

Nevertheless I am EXTREMELY to bilbus for all his replies and posts.

Thanks everyone.
 

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no each mailbox is not a database. Each mailbox has data, and that data is stored in a database.

Each storage roup is not a database either. there are 2 things in a storage group. a shared transaction log, and databases. Think of it as a folder that holds databases and log files ... but it's not a database it self.

Each database is stored in a storage group ... but each database is completely seperate from each other database .. other then one thing. all databases in a storage group share the same transaction logs.

Thats why it's best to put each database its own storage group, makes restoring simpler.

As for databases, you can have 10,000 mailboxes if you wanted in a database / storage group there is no size/user limit.

We have 13,000 users, across 4 mailbox servers, each server has around 3000 users. Each mailbox server has 5 storage groups, each with 1 database, with 500 or so users per database.

The reason to limit the number of users in a database is keep the size down to a manageable amount. It's much better to have 5x 40gb databases then a single 200gb database. smaller the database the quicker it is to restore, move users, offline defrags.
 

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Storage groups can do a few things.

You have a place to store databases.

A place to resore a database, but not overwrite the live database (recovery storage group) Used to pull data out or resore single items.

and last, you can configure local continous replication, and replicate one database in one storage group to a database on another storage group on the same server. If the disk with the first database fails, you can manualy cut over to the second copy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
drumtech150 was 100% right. bilbus you really seem to be the pro and the guru here!

Thanks a lot for taking the time to educate me. Really appreciate all the replies and help.
 
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