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As oscer1 has already posted, for HP computers, ESC and F9 are keys that are often used.

As a general rule with HP computers, if it's a desktop it's F12, and if it's a laptop then it's ESC and/or F9.

So give them a try, and if that doesn't work, then I think the easiest way forward is to just edit your bios/uefi firmware settings. I'll talk you through how to do that if it becomes necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Rather than manually interfering directly with the Bios, placing the MR boot option on the C-drive gives a Windows/MR recovery option on the Windows start menu -

Thus the option shows on startup -


If MR is then selected, surely it will then go to the flash drive rescue media.
 

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The disadvantage of having Macrium System Recovery on your Boot Menu, is that you are installing it on a partition on your hard drive, so if your hard drive fails, then your ability to recover fails as well.

With your Recovery Media installed to a USB, and your disk image on detachable hard drive, then if your system (windows) hard drive fails, you can replace the drive, and then recover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
The disadvantage of having Macrium System Recovery on your Boot Menu, is that you are installing it on a partition on your hard drive, so if your hard drive fails, then your ability to recover fails as well.

With your Recovery Media installed to a USB, and your disk image on detachable hard drive, then if your system (windows) hard drive fails, you can replace the drive, and then recover.
Gary, but surely the Bios is also on my C-drive. The boot option shown in my post 22 is not part of Windows, it is in effect a GOTO inserted in the PC start-up boot procedure pre-Windows e.g GOTO Windows 10 or GOTO Macrium Reflect.
 

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On most computers the F12 key gives you the boot menu, but on HP computers you press F9 for the boot menu or the ESC key. To enter Setup (Bios) on an HP computer, you press the F10 key.
 

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Gary, but surely the Bios is also on my C-drive. The boot option shown in my post 22 is not part of Windows, it is in effect a GOTO inserted in the PC start-up boot procedure pre-Windows e.g GOTO Windows 10 or GOTO Macrium Reflect.
No, your BIOS is firmware located in a chip usually on your Motherboard, and is not on your hard drive at all.

What I said is my interpretation of what I read on Macrium's site, it is not based on personal experience so I could well be wrong in some of the details (I don't know for certain that it will partition your hard drive).

The obvious thing to do, is to give it a try and see whether it works the way you want it to, or not.
 

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Just so you know ....

A very basic breakdown of a computer's boot process is as follows ....

  1. Switch on power
  2. Computer executes POST (power on self test) which establishes whether all the necessary hardware components are present and functional
  3. When complete it hands over to your firmware (BIOS or UEFI) which runs further checks, and initialises a number of processes. Firmware is usually located in an EEPROM (electrically eraseable programable read only memory) chip on your motherboard.
  4. When completed it will locate your operating system, and hand over to that to complete the boot.
Your Firmware can be instructed to give priority to what devices it attempts to boot from first. This is usually your hard drive, as that is usually where your OS will be found, but you can change it so that it gives boot priority to a USB drive if a bootable USB is present.

A temporary change in firmware boot priority is generally performed by hitting a function key on power up, but you can also edit your firmware to make the change in priority permanent using the firmware interface.
 

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The Macrium System Recovery is written to the same partition on your HDD as the Boot files on Windows, it does not create a separate partition on your HDD.
So, every time you start your computer you are going to have to choose between booting to Windows or Macrium. As stated, If that annoyance isn't enough, if your HDD fails you will not be able to restore your image to a new HDD/SSD unless you have a Macrium Reflect Flash Drive to boot to so you can lead it to your saved image on the separate external drive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Thank you all for your excellent and explanatory posts.
 
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