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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For some reason, when I plugged in a computer I'd recently modded for better cooling (that really screwed the computer up, even though I am certain all parts should work together and were installed correctly), and started it up, the power supply literally exploded. I heard a loud bang, there was a great flash and the smell of burning afterwards. I did unplug it by the way. When I last tested it, although it hadn't worked then either, it didn't explode! It just didn't show anything on the screen :\ Now I get the feeling that £140 worth of items said to be very good with cooling and years worth of work on the hard-disc has just gone to waste and exploded -.-

It was a 500W PSU, and the fan was a Zalman fan, the GPU was an 8600GT with a heatsync, and the memory sticks had heatsyncs. It wasn't plugged into a monitor though.
 

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First of all, I doubt your HD is toasted. or any of the fans. Anything else is best guess. If your psu had overvoltage/overcurrent protection at the back end, then you should be alright. If not . . .

As to the cause of the meltdown, check that the psu has a voltage selector switch on it (it may or may not have one). Usually red with 110/220 marked on it. Since you are in England, that should be in the 220 volt postition.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First of all, I doubt your HD is toasted. or any of the fans. Anything else is best guess. If your psu had overvoltage/overcurrent protection at the back end, then you should be alright. If not . . .

As to the cause of the meltdown, check that the psu has a voltage selector switch on it (it may or may not have one). Usually red with 110/220 marked on it. Since you are in England, that should be in the 220 volt postition.

Hmm .. do you mean the surge protector by the overvoltage/current protection? It didn't have one, but it was only on for a second. Mind you, this house was wired up terribly, or so it seems.

Also, no switch, it's 230V.
 

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overvoltage/current protection
This is built into good quality psu's. Keeps the power levels on the outputs from spiking and taking out downline components.
 

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Yes it is a cheap low quality PSU and it "could" have damaged other hardware when it failed. I would get a quality PSU and bench test with it.

1) Remove EVERYTHING from the case
2) Set the motherboard on a non conductive surface. The motherboard box is perfect for this. DO NOT PLACE THE MOTHERBOARD ON THE STATIC BAG! It can actually conduct electricity! We are going to try and assemble a running system outside of the case.
3) Install the CPU and heat sink.
4) Install 1 stick of RAM.
5) Install the video card and attach the power supply connection(s) to the card if your card needs it.
6) Connect the monitor to the video card.
7) Connect the power supply to the motherboard with both the 24pin main ATX Power connection and the separate 4 or 8 pin power connection.
8) Connect power to the power supply.
9) Do NOT connect ANYTHING else. Make sure you have the power connector on the CPU fan connected.
10) Use a small screwdriver to momentarily short the power switch connector on the motherboard. Consult your motherboard manual to find which two pins connect to your case's power switch. Then touch both pins with a screwdriver to complete the circuit and boot the system.

If all is well, it should power up and you should get a display. Then assemble the parts into the case and try again. If the system now fails to boot, you have a short in the case and need to recheck your motherboard standoffs.

If the system does not boot after this process, then you most likely have a faulty component. You'll need to swap parts, start with the power supply, until you determine what is defective.
 
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