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I've got what I think might be a unique problem. Started up the computer yesterday morning just like I always do and noticed it was quieter than usual. Opened up the case and found that both of the fans in the PSU (430W Antec) and the heatsink fan on my video card (radeon 9800) were not spinning. My three case fans as well at the heat sink fan on the CPU were spinning just fine. I thought at first it might be a PSU problem so I swapped it out with a brand new one (400W Antec) and ran into the same exact problem.

The computer seems to run ok...although I use it sparingly due to the heat issues...and the video card seems to run just fine as well. <br> I double checked all the connections on the motherboard that I could think of, even went so far as to take the board out of the case to make sure it wasn't grounding out but the problem presists. Could it still be a problem with the PSU or am I looking at a possible motherboard problem? Its a Abit IS7G.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Thanks for the fast reply,
I've thought about that, its an Antec TruePower which has that lose noise technology in it but the psu now gets sorta hot to the touch if I leave it on too long which can't be right and I recall the fans spinnning from startup in the past.

As far as the fan on the graphics card going bad I supose thats also a possibility but it seems rather coincidental that both of these issues seem to have cropped up at the same time. :sad:

-Dave
 

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Welcome to TSF:

when you swapped for the 400Watt PSU after running the system for say 20 minutes; do the fans in the psu spin ?????

does the video card fan spin with the replacement PSU ?????

it could be a coincidence that the video card fan and psu fan both died ???? but not if the same symptoms have occured with the replacement / although what are the details of the "replacement" >>>> did it get overwhelmed in that system prior to the install of the 430 ??????

Just food for thought : P4 systems above say 2.6mhz and equilivant AMD machines should really be running on 500 watt PSU's for trouble free performance >>> a 430 watt PSU is only capable of delivering a sustained 330 watts of power at full load ??????

at first guess (there really isnt enough info here to make a super accurate diagnosis) it looks like your motherboards internal reporting thermal protections arent working / in otherwords ; its generally the motherboard that reports the system temps to the power supply resulting in the need to activate or increase the rpm's of the fans ????

regards

joe
 

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I dont think they "cropped" up at the same time ~~ but rather you noticed them at the same time

I too own a tru power antec 550 / the psu fan and video card fan spin immediately upon boot every time i start the machine / if i let it sit dormant >> the psu fan will slow down but never off !!!!!!




joe
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Again thanks for the response,
I let the new 400W psu, which is also an AntecTruePower run for probably close to an hour with the fans never showing any sign of attempting to spin. Same goes for the fan on the video card...never even twitched with the new or old PSU.

As far as the new 400W Antec TruePower 2.0 PSU getting overwhelmed I supose thats a possibility but I all I had connected to it was the mobo (Abit IS7G, 1 hard drive (WD 7200rpm 200Gb SATA) and the fans( 2 80mm case fans, the fan on the Radeon 9800, and the heat sink fan on the P4). Seems to me a 400W outta be able to handle that without getting overwhelmed. I've had this same system with the same setup for just at if not slightly longer than 2 years. This is the first major issue I've had with it.

Also as far as the possibility that the video card has had this problem prior to the PSU issues, I've noticed that in graphics intensive applictions like games, after about 10-15 mins the computer locks up and crashes. This hadn't been an issue for me before yesterday. Which leads me to think its overheating as a result of the fan no longer operating.

Sorry for the lengthy posts, just trying to give as much info as possible.

Thanks again,
Dave
 

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Dave:


the more input the better:

here is a wattage calculator link just for info / try it and see what you come up with / remember the results are the power needed to run you system / not the size of the PSU you they you to install / you will need to add 30% to the power calc to compensate for electrical inefficiency of PSU's
http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/

I would remove the side cover off the case and use a house fan blowing into the computer >>> see if this makes for a stable machine ????

I suspect the build-up of heat inside your computer along with the excessive overload is killing the psu !! kinda like pulling a tractor trailer box with a pick-up trk >>> it may do it for a few miles but it aint gonna get you accross country

here is a psu & cooling article that explains things much better

If a power supply is consuming 450 Watts from the AC side, but on the DC side the output is only 400 Watts, then the math tells us that the PSU is ~89% efficient in its power conversion and the other 11% (50W) is lost as heat. That 50W of heat is no different than if you were running a 50W light bulb, you pay for that power usage on your electric bill. Not to mention the heat must be cooled, so there is an additional cooling cost that some people don't think about. So in the short-term a cheaper PSU may fit your budget better, but in the long term you will end up paying for it several times over. It is definitely worth comparing power supply efficiency ratings and choosing the most efficient power supply that your budget allows for.



Power Supplies & Cooling

When you start adding lots of features to your PC (more drives, better video, and so on), they all require more power. And anyone who works with electricity knows that more power means more heat to displace. With that in mind, here are my recommendations for keeping things running smoothly once you add all the goodies:

1. Power--too much power is always better than too little. You should figure your minimum power based on the components inside. If you do an online search for "power supply calculator," you should be able to find a couple of online sites that allow you to check off what you have in your system and get back a power rating. As a general guideline, here are the basics:

a) Minimum power needed: 36 Watts (Motherboard 25 Watts, Floppy 5 Watts, Keyboard and Mouse 3 Watts, CPU Fan 3 Watts)

b) CPU - 2 choices here and quite a variance even in a particular class, AMD processors are typically 60-80 Watts with the newer versions being even more power hungry while Intel processors are typically between 80 and 110 Watts. So just for basics lets figure 90 Watts for the processor.

c) Video card - AGP slot has a maximum potential for about 45 watts, some of the newer high end cards require more power and might have external power options, if that's the case you might want to find out the power rating for your particular card, otherwise let's figure about 35 watts for a normal video card, and 50 watts for a higher end model.

d) Calculate about 10 watts for each stick of memory in your PC.

e) Hard drives - 25 Watts for EACH drive

f) CD/DVD drives - 25 Watts for EACH drive

g) Roughly about 5 watts for each PCI card in your system (this can vary quite a bit, some of the SoundBlaster cards with all the bells and whistles reportedly require close to 20 Watts)

h) Each external device connected through USB (not USB slots, but actual devices connected to the PC (5 Watts each) - NOTE: you can calculate 8 Watts for each Firewire device

i) Add another 3 Watts for each extra fan located inside your case.

Take all those figures, add them together, and then calculate in another 25% for a buffer. You never want to run your power supply maxed out, so if your power needs are 350 Watts based on your devices, you should be looking at a 425 or 450 Watt power supply.

Now, with all that power you need to keep the inside of your PC cool. What you need to keep in mind with cooling is that you have to keep air flow going through your case. That means that all the fans moving air can't be doing the same thing, if they are all blowing air out, you need at least one fan turned around to pull some cool air in. You also want to try to position fans (not always easy to do) for maximum airflow. Keep in mind that warm air rises, so any fans near the top of your case you would generally want blowing OUT to get the hot air out of the case. And if you have a fan mounted lower in the case turn it around so it is blowing into the case and pulling that cooler air inside. This will create a nice air-flow with cool air coming in low, it will warm up as it comes in and rise to the top of the case where it gets pushed out.

The final item to look at, is one of the biggest generators of heat in your system is your CPU. So to keep things even cooler you might want to consider putting a larger CPU fan onto your processor. While this might sound like a simple task (and technically it is) you do run the risk of possible cracking your processor if you improperly seat your fan. So if you are the least bit hesitant about attempting to change out your fan yourself you might want to take it into a shop or get a computer buddy to help you out. When selecting a new fan, make sure to check the dB (decibel) rating as you don't want to create an aircraft landing sound every time your PC is turned on. Might not seem like a big deal, but sit next to a computer that is pushing a lot of air for a bit and that steady hum will tend to drive most people crazy. Just spend a little extra from the start to get "silent" running fans everywhere you can inside your case.

Hope that helps you get the most power and cooling out of your system. You might also want to consider replacing the whole case with a new high power, quiet, good airflow design version. But that would be a whole other topic to discuss.

Good luck, and happy computing.
 
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