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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello.

i'm new in this forum, so i didn't know whether this topic has been posted before or not.

yesterday, i accidentally plugging the wrong power supply (19V 2.1A) to my toshiba 1gb external hard drive (12V 2A).

no smoke appear when this happened.

when i plugged in the right power supply, the LED on the hard drive keep on blinking, but it is not detected in my PC.

so, i would like to know whether any of you has any suggestions, or any ideas whether my drive is dead or it is just damaging my usb enclosure.

thanks alots in advance.
 

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Re: Power supply Burnt External Hard Drive

natsuandhappy
If the external drive will NOT work in any PC: My best guess, the enclosure is trash and the drive is good. The only way to be sure is open it up (Voids athe warranty) and connect the drive via hdd to USB adapter or another external enclosure.
 

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Most of these type of situations we get in, the enclosure survives the overvoltage, it is pretty simple circuitry, the drive inside usually is what is damaged. Specifically the TVS diodes which provide overvoltage protection. To confirm, remove the drive from teh enclosure and connect it directly to a PC as an internal. If the PC does not power on with the drive attached internal then likelihood is the TVS went out. If it loads OK then it was the enclosure. I would suspect tho it is the TVS diode on the drive. You can use the forum search function to search here in HD support for tvs for discussions about the TVS diodes. Once you get the drive removed, if you can post a clear closeup pic of the component side of the Hard Drives printed circuit board we can help you identify the TVS if it doesn't spin up when attached internally.
 

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If you're lucky you blew a fuse inside the enclosure, if there is one fitted. Open the enclosure and remove the drive to see if you can connect directly to another USB Adapter or directly to a cable and power connector inside your PC.

A working USB Adapter is preferred since it offers extra protection in the case that the drive has been damaged .. the adapter is cheaper to replace than the motherboard
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah, i think the tvs diodes went out, as i try to use another enclosure (i bought a new one), the drive is not spinning. below is the picture of my hdd. when i go thru the old threads as suggested by raptor_pa, i noticed my hdd is a bit different with the others. but hope i can recover all the data, because there is a lot of files in there, which is almost impossible to back them up due to the large size (mostly videos).

 

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What is the make and model number of the drive, remove the 4 torx screws and the PCB should lift off, the components are on the other side :) a bit closer if you possibly can and still keep it in focus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i'll try to remove it, and i'll post the new picture later. it is toshiba 1TB drive, but when i open it, the hdd actually manufactured by western digital..lol...

model: wd10eavs-00d7b0
 

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if the PCB is a problem and you want to try another one you'll have to try and match all the statistics of the drive that you are holding. I think it has to do with the data on the white label in the photo as we see it. Different batches of drives and platters will have differing characteristics and algolithms making it highly unlikely that a straight swap of pcb's between similar size drives will be successful.

your drive btw looks like my 500GB WD

your model no : wd10eavs-00d7b0 should also very closely match the pcb of any drive that you might want to try swapping with .. I have several 80GB drives from WD and all have very similar but different dates of manufacture and model number, especially after the drive type which leads me to suspect that it is important to match those numbers up.
 

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Most likely cause is a TVS failure, which is a simple fix to get the data back. The PCB swap that worked 100% on this family of drives would be nothing short of a miracle. Too much of the drive adaptives are stored on the PCB, so unless you fouind a drive that had almost identical parameters it would be a failure, and could even cause more damage. The days of simple PCB swaps are about gone. Most WDs require moving the patient NVram (usually u12) to the donor board, or using a programmer to read the microcode from u12 and flash it to the u12 of the donor. Things like preamp bias voltage, head parameters, P-list, translator all have to match, and are actually defined and loaded to the NVram and SA area specifically for each individual drive. Either a PCB swap or removing the damaged TVS are pretty much relegated to recovery efforts. If the PCB swap does init the drive, chances are it will produce a lot of bad sectors, or at least very slow reads and writes. The TVS removal leaves the more delicate electronics exposed since the Over voltage supressor is now missing. Either case is not going to result in a repaired/reuseable drive - simply a drive that functions well enough to get the data back.
 
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