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Discussion Starter #1
I need some help.

I have a geforce4 mx 420 and I have read up on overclocking and I was wondering, how on earth do you do it?

Can someone help me out?

Also can this mess up my computer or card?
 

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TSF Enthusiast
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www.overclockers.com is a site that will show you the basics of overclocking. And yes, since overclocking involves making your device run at a higher speed than it was meant to, it may damage it if you don't take proper measures (i.e., putting cooling devices in to take care of the heat produced by the overclocking process). This will definately void any warranty on the card (and more than likely your computer, too).

Make sure you know what you're doing before you attempt something like this.
 

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Lacoka Nostra
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I have seen pictures, people puting on a old 486 or a socket 7 heatsink on there GPU on there video card. If I was you I put little heatsink on the memory on both sides of the card. Try to get a big copper heatsink & little copper heatsinks for the memory. Go to www.twco.com look for on the right side of the page you will see "Extreme cooling" click that. Then click video cooling, then click zalman ZM80-HP cooper heatsink thats what you need.......
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK I am not all the fluent with heatsinks and all. But will two heatsinks make that much difference?? And about how much do they cost???
 

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oh man

the number and size of your heat sinks makes all the difference.....


if a cpu has a 2 inch x 2 inch surface to deflect units of heat (for example only, i am not using a specific heat measurement) it will deflect at a given speed.....

now lets say that speed is 100 units per minute....

now, imagine that the processor produces 450 units of heat per minute...

you need 450% or a surface area of nearly 5x4 inches....

well, a heat sink has that much more surface area, the way it is built it has more surface area folded up into a smaller space...

so if you had twice the cooling that you need, your system would be quite cool. but if you have half the cooling that you need, then it is going to overheat and lock up the moment the gain catches up with the loss.

in other words you need to bail the heat out as fast, or faster than it is pouring in...

if i had more than 8 megs on my video, i would be running a cooler of some sort... most of the good ones these days have heatsinks and fans on them. and some of the systems at www.alienware.com have extra "sidekick" style graphics card coolers that live in the right spot in the tower....

so yes, they do make some difference.


~BoB~
 

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Lacoka Nostra
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He is right the bigger the better, but copper heatsinks track heat of the processor better then aluminum heatsinks. Can run around
$4-49 dollars here is a picture one of the best heatsink you can get for a video card. And remember to get little or big heatsinks for the memory on both sides of the card.
 

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