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Discussion Starter #1
Helloland yes I'm new to this !!!

I have a DSL connection, I have 2 routers both Wi-fi, Linksys Wrt54G and Siemens Speedstream 6520, now I have setup the wireless passwords for the Linksys still I would like to know if there is a way to make it more secure, I'm running 128 Wep encription but that's all, with the Siemens I have trouble cause it was given to me by my ISP, still I want to have the same key for both and a way to increase the range of my network, I have seen the option with my Linksys to change the channel from 1 to 11 and that means different wave lenght, not that is a huge difference but still wich one is better.

Thx for any help !!!!

Fen :sayyes:
 

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The channel wavelength isn't significant, the usual reason to change the channel is to avoid some interfering device.

The improvement over WEP is WPA/PSK, which it appears both of your units support.

How do you have these two routers connected?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I used the Siemens as the first router and the Linksys as the second, the Siemens has the DSL modem embeded but my Linksys is the one I use to connect my game consoles and pc, besides I have the Linksys (Gateway) hooked to one of the Ethernet ports in the back of the Siemens.

Is that good or bad, and how can I get more speed if posible, I mean sometimes I get a faster connection using the wireless connection to a laptop than the wired to my desktop, sorry if I'm too pushy let's just keep on the issues of the first post so we can stay on track.

Thanks for ur help btw !!

Fen
 
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you can turn off ssid broadcast, not to be confussed with turning off the wireless. change the ssid from default, turn off dhcp and use static ip's.
use encryption, what ever your workstations support. change your log on password on the router.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ok, I got ur idea just a little slower!!! :sayyes:

I don't know about static Ip's, I mean I only have a couple pc's conected wirelessly and is just every now and then, so I think I'll preffer to keep it like it is, about the SSID broadcast I took your advice, my router has a different name from the beginning as well as my network and password, first things first!!! :laugh:

Fen
 

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There is no reason to use static IP addresses, but I'd certainly enable WPA encryption unless you're really sure that nobody can drive by and tap into the network.

The reason I ask about the configuration of the network is that it's important to understand the configuration to offer useful suggestions. When I configure two routers, here's the configuration I use.

Connecting two SOHO broadband routers together.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!
 

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johnwill said:
There is no reason to use static IP addresses, but I'd certainly enable WPA encryption unless you're really sure that nobody can drive by and tap into the network.
Well, some people like to turn off DHCP because "out of the box" routers work on a default subnet, and it would be easy for an attacker to guess the range if they new the model of your router. A DHCP server would also assign an outside intruder an IP address automatically. Issuing static addresses that are not in the default subnet would leave the attacker guessing which range to use. It's just one more layer of security.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Johnwill and Resolution Thx both for the help, as a matter of fact I got my encryption turned to WPA and DHCP is allowed only for 2 users, I don't actually know if it's going to block my consoles from going online, or if it will work as long as there is only 2 users connected to the router.
That's what I did on my Linksys, again the other is Siemens but due to the fact that is a DSL modem at the same time I preffer not to touch it and actually my problem is that the program that manages the router is made by the ISP so there is not too much I can do, not even WPA is an option.
Oh btw, I have to turn back on the SSID broadcast cause I don't know how to make the laptop to find the connection.

Fen :laugh:
 
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OK This is just me so you may see it differently

If someone is trying to break into your wireless, you do not want DHCP there, like your dog meeting you at the front door, tail wagging, tongue hanging out, ready to hand out an ip address. Unless you have a seetting in your router to only connect to these workstation , and there is a list of mac addreses of your work stations only....but thats just me talking, it's totaly up to you.
If for instance your ip gateway is 192.168.100.254
you could make your workstations 192.168.1.10
and 192.168.1.20
also another good idea is to change the 3rd octet if your router will let you
ie.. 192.168.100.10 ...see it is now 100, instead of 1, you will also have to change your gateway too. this makes it harder to guess also.
 

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John posted this awhile back. It is worth reading, if you have not. http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43

With the tools out there, there is always a way to get on your wireless network if they really want to. Secure it best you can and look at the connected machines every now and again. Also password protect your pc's so if they do get in, all they get is free internet.
 

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Terrister said:
John posted this awhile back. It is worth reading, if you have not. http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
I don't usually pay attention to cynics. He's more or less speaking from the perspective of a determined attacker that wants into a specific network.

Even WEP is better than no encryption. Disabling SSID broadcasting is a measure of security. MAC filtering has its uses when combined with other security measures. Disabling DHCP is simple networking logic, and creates another hurdle for an intruder to jump over.

A secure network has multi-layered security. You never should rely on a single feature for security.
 

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Actually, that link is right on target. Disabling SSID's, filtering MAC addresses, and turning off DHCP only make the network harder for you to use, they do very little for security. Those measures will only stop the most casual of intruders. Encryption is the only real security, and WEP is better than nothing, but WPA with a long random key is still the only way to have good security for your wireless network.
 
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if they are not good then why do they include them as an option in the router. ?
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Hey :beerchug: , I just want some help not to start an argument :laugh: , I really appreciate the help and the different points of view, as a matter of fact I find out that by disabling DHCP or SSID I have trouble when trying to stablish a connection using a laptop or my Xbox, sorry I may sound a little troubled on something I think you guys get so easy but again I'm a newbie to this thing, I want a secure home network capable of allowing the occasional friends laptop or a PSP to get in the network under my knowledge and supervision, btw thanks for the link, I hope my small network thing won't make ppl get mad at each other. :cool:

Fen
 

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The only security I have on my wireless network is WPA with a random 24 character key. I've had a couple of guys that do security for a Fortune 100 company attempt to crack it, just to see if it could be done. No joy, they didn't get to first base. You also proved my point with the SSID and DHCP, as I mentioned, it just makes it harder for you to use your network. :smile:

If anyone has a link that says that WPA/PSK with a properly complex key is not sufficient security for a wireless network, I'd sure like to see it. We're talking home and small business networks here, not CIA or DOD.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
After all this commenting, I have another question, Is there a way to assign more bandwith to an specific member?, I mean if I have somebody connected trough my wireless part but I'm playing, I don't want to downgrade my game connection too much cause somebody else is browsing, so is there a way?

And finally, and this is actually about this Siemens modem/router, this modem has a light almost for everything, Power/Ethernet/Wireless/Dsl/USb, it's ok when the internet light is on when my pc is off, I mean when nobody is supposed to be connected, I have already changed the name and passwords of my router and network keys, even the channels, but still sometimes it stays off and suddenly it turns back on, so I don't know what's going on.

:sad:
 
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