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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My OEM power supply started smelling like burning a few days ago. It didn't go out and still works, it just smells bad.

I purchased a new APower 480-Watt ATX power supply. It's got the same wattage and stats as the one OEM that lasted for 13 months.

The everything is running, except my NEC monitor stays in power save mode. I thought for a second I fried the GPU, but I hooked up my still-working old power supply and the monitor operated like normal.

I hooked up an old Dell monitor to the new power supply, and it also stayed in power save mode.

This has stumped me and everyone I've talked to.

Is this a faulty power supply or is there something I'm not doing?
 

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Whats the video card?
Your powersupply may not be supplying the correct voltages to your video card as required. BTW how are you deciding that the monitor is going into power saving mode? For instance does the monitor power LED change color from green to orange? Green is generally "On and receiving signal" whereas orange is usually "On without signal".

You shouldn't be looking to the wattage supplied but on the 12v rails realistically.
 

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dells before the P4 were propriatary wired
aopen is not a quality supply and may be supplying less output than the previous one
when you change the power supply it is best not replace but to upgrade
check that you connected the aux power plug to the m/b and the card if required
if you can use a multimeter check it out
http://www.techsupportforum.com/har...-tricks/65936-troubleshooting-multimeter.html
ask for a replacement
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
The monitor's LED light stays at orange.

Everything's been connected to the motherboard and in regards to the connection to the video card, I've used multiple different connections just to see if it was a faulty outlet. Everyone produced the same results.

My video card is a GeForce 7800 GS Xtreme that I purchased new in June 2006.

Here is the link to the power supply I ordered. Practically identical to the OEM one I had for 13 months. A friend of mine's OEM supply burnt out after 1 month. He bought a similar one for $20 that has worked ever since, so I decided to do the same. Since I guess now would be a good time to learn about power supplies a little bit, any recommendations on what I should get?

Would it be a good idea to hook up an older video card that doesn't require a power connection to the PSU and see if it runs then?
 

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To be honest with you theres not a chance of that running your PC as dai mentioned, and you'll end up damaging components with heavy losses and feeble performance. Have a read of the Power Supply Selection guide as linked above by dai, which states what is done nowadays to "dupe" individuals and cause them subsequent losses. It provides you excellent advice by pro's and testers who do this day in day out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alright, I sent the APower PSU back and decided I'd try to find the best thing locally since I can get a refund (and based on the prices I've seen for it online, looks like I paid about $60 too much) than go through the hassle of ordering online again.

I picked up an Echo Star 580-Watt and made sure to ask if the +12v rail was at least 18a. It is 19a. Anyways, I hooked it up and at first the monitor did not come on and stayed in power save with the orange LED on the monitor as usual. However, I played around with the AGP connection and made sure everything was snug. When I flipped it back on, the monitor actually came on and displayed the startup. However, at the point where it usually determines the system's RAM, it just stopped. Nothing flipped off. Everything on the screen stayed the same. Everything in the computer kept running. The keyboard worked. It just wouldn't clock the RAM and stopped. I turned it off and played with the cord again, and it went back to the monitor staying in power save.

After that, I disassembled the entire computer since it was in need of a good cleaning anyways. I hooked it all back up, made sure everything was cleaned up. I made sure all connections were made and snug. It continued to stay in power save mode.

What's so weird about this is when my APower PSU on Thursday night wouldn't work, I hooked up my old, still-working-but-smells-bad OEM supply and everything worked fine. I haven't tried hooking it up again because I don't want to risk damaging anything.

Am I just making bad calls on PSUs? I'm trying to learn more about PSUs, and I guess I'm just having to pay my dues.

All of this is just frustrating for me. A friend of mine's power supply totally burned up to the point back in July 2005 that it stunk up the whole house for 30 minutes. It completely went out and wouldn't turn back on. He just picked up a new one locally much like his other one for about $70, plugged it up, it worked with no problem, and he's had zero problems since. And I caught mine before it even went out, and have gone through two unsuccessful PSUs.

If it matters, this is my motherboard/CPU and my video card is linked in a previous post up above. If anyone is positive that I'm just making bad PSU choices, can someone recommend me based on that motherboard a good one that's not over $100? I appreciate all the help.
 

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GeForce 7800 GS graphics card: NVIDIA recommends ideally a 400 watt power supply with 20 ampere minimal on the 12 volts rails.

If the PSU cannot cope...

* bad 3D performance
* crashing games
* spontaneous resetting PC
* erratic display behavior
* freezes during gameplay
* PSU overload can cause it to break down
* fry/damage your mobo

There's many PSU's above $60 below $100 that are very good for your needs too. If you read the PSU selection guide, see the manufacturers and models supported here and look for one of those. You'll have the option to return PSU you've just purchased aswell.
 

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The power supply you chose for your system is rated low.
Under close inspection, do you notice any leaking or mis-shaped capacitors on the mainboard? The power supply could have damaged it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
On the board of the original OEM supply, yes, the capacitors were leaking.

Last night I did a double-thorough check to see if anything like that happened to the motherboard and I could not find any sign of capacitor leak or any leakage from the OEM PSU board onto anything outside of it.

For the record, this morning I hooked up an old GeForce3 Ti 200 video card and it didn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nope, no BIOS. So I guess I'll try a CMOS reset, something I've never really done before.

How do I clear CMOS if that part of my motherboard only has 2 pins? Everything I've read says to move the jumper on 1-2 to 2-3 or 60 seconds and then put it back. But my motherboard only has 2 pins.

My motherboard's manual says this word-for-word:

CLR_CMOS (Clear CMOS)
You can clear the motherboard CMOS with the jumper to return your system to its initial status. To prevent improper usage, the jumper does not include the jumper plug. If you wish to use the Clear CMOS function, please short circuit the 1-2Pin.

It then illustrates the two pins with the two pins dark, saying Short : Clear CMOS and the two pins lightened, saying Open : Normal.

Do I just stick a jumper on the pins with the power unplugged for 60 seconds and then remove it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Also, it currently does not have a jumper at all, but I have two spare ones.

There is a very tiny black piece of plastic that slides to the bottom over the two pins.
 

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Yes that is what is done i.e. move pins from current position of #1 and #2 to #2 and #3, leave for a few minutes and then replace back. Or you could just remove the power supply to the system and then take out the battery, leave it out for about 20-30 minutes and then replace it back in. The tiny black plastic sleeves are the jumpers here. They need to be slid over the #2 and #3 pins to clear CMOS if that method is chosen.

Note: Make sure to have grounded yourself as ESD (electrostatic discharge) can destroy your motherboard and other electrical components.

The signs of leakage will need to be checked on your motherboard capacitors here, around the CPU especially. Look for bulging and leaking capacitors.
 

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with 2 pins you either put a jumper on them for a few secs or touch them witha small screwdriver after disconecting the power plug from the wall socket and removing the battery
 
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