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Discussion Starter #1
I got a Sapphire R9 280x 3gb 384bit GPU and it caught fire...
Scenario:
Scenario:
I bought brandnew parts of a gaming rig, except for the GPU (4 months old now) then i tried it out.

At 2AM, I Installed all the parts, installed OS then installed drivers and then watched movies until 5AM and left it On until i woke up 11 or 12PM. When I woke up I decided to reformat my PC because of driver issues regarding hdmi sound output and I wanted another partition.. Then reinstalled OS, reinstalled drivers and after 30-40 mins from reformatting the PC and I was only at the desktop installing some programs(7zip,poweriso,etc) my rig suddenly turned off with a spark coming from the case.
I just ignored it and turned it on again, but to my surprise, the PC after 1-2 seconds of the HDD LED, it shut OFF and I saw a fire on my GPU just near the pins, and it looked like a matchstick.. The fire lasted for 1-3 seconds max...
I immediately unplugged the pc and got my gpu then checked if it's properly inserted, also the pins.. Then I cleaned it to make sure there's no dust, and plugged it back again. Same thing happned, there was a fire like a matchstick.

I decided to go to a licensed computer technician at 5pm, they tried the pc on the other PSU and put the GPU on the other pci slot and put the mobo on a flat wooden surface.. but Boom! just the same. it lit fire and smelled burnt plastic inside their shop.
After all of that, the technicians still did not know the main cause of it :/
Does anyone know? I'll attach Pics, and here's my Specs btw:

AMD FX6300 (brandnew)
8gb(2x4gb) 1866mhz Gskill ripjaws (brandnew)
Gigabyte 970 DS3P (brandnew)
Sapphire Dual X r9 280x 3gb 384 bit (4months old and had no problem at all)
Corsair VS650 (brandnew)

Thank you so much if you could enlighten me with the cause of this problem..

PS: The GPU was already accepted for RMA and will receive it anytime this week, I'm just scared it might happen again so please if you know something tell me :(
 

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It looks like you have a capacitor that failed. Unfortunately, the resultant fire also appears to have burned the circuit board. If the card is still under warranty then RMA it. If it isn't you might be able to get it running again by replacing he capacitor. However, by the looks of the circuit board I'd not get my hopes too high as nearby components and traces also were probably damaged.

Corsair VS650

Voltage +12V
Max. Current 50A
Max Combined Wattage 600W

Not their best PSU by far but it shouldn't cause a system to "blow up" either and it has sufficient output to power a single-card gaming system, if it is functioning correctly that is. If your RMA'd card also catches fire then I'd suspect the PSU. If this was my system and I was still within the return period for the PSU, I'd return it and set a Seasonic 620 W or an XFX 650 W just to be on the safe side.

SeaSonic S12II 620 Bronze 620W ATX12V V2.3 / EPS 12V V2.91 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - Newegg.com

XFX Core Edition PRO650W (P1-650S-NLB9) 650W ATX12V 2.2 & ESP12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - Newegg.com
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It looks like you have a capacitor that failed. Unfortunately, the resultant fire also appears to have burned the circuit board. If the card is still under warranty then RMA it. If it isn't you might be able to get it running again by replacing he capacitor. However, by the looks of the circuit board I'd not get my hopes too high as nearby components and traces also were probably damaged.

Corsair VS650

Voltage +12V
Max. Current 50A
Max Combined Wattage 600W

Not their best PSU by far but it shouldn't cause a system to "blow up" either and it has sufficient output to power a single-card gaming system, if it is functioning correctly that is. If your RMA'd card also catches fire then I'd suspect the PSU. If this was my system and I was still within the return period for the PSU, I'd return it and set a Seasonic 620 W or an XFX 650 W just to be on the safe side.

SeaSonic S12II 620 Bronze 620W ATX12V V2.3 / EPS 12V V2.91 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - Newegg.com

XFX Core Edition PRO650W (P1-650S-NLB9) 650W ATX12V 2.2 & ESP12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - Newegg.com
Thank you so much for your response..
I already had the gpu shipped for RMA but i am too scared to try it out when I get it again.. if i try to power on everything without the gpu it turns on fine..
I also had my psu checked at the shop where i got it, and they said it's fine and they saw no problem but haven't tried it myself and i am too scared to try it out.. :(
 

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Depending on how they checked it (did they hook it up to a tester or put it in another system or just "look" at it?) the PSU may be fine. If it is, then the problem probably was a faulty GPU and you should be fine using the PSU with a new video card. I'd still push for a replacement PSU if the unit is within the "no questions asked" return period. If it isn't, I'd at the least ask the shop techs what they did to assure themselves the PSU was OK.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Depending on how they checked it (did they hook it up to a tester or put it in another system or just "look" at it?) the PSU may be fine. If it is, then the problem probably was probably a faulty GPU and you should be fine using the PSU with a new video card. I'd still push for a replacement PSU if the unit is within the "no questions asked" return period. In it isn't , I'd at the least I'd ask the shop what they did to assure themselves the PSU was OK.
I'll get back to the shop regarding the psu as soon as possible.. and ask them how they checked it.. Thanks sir..
But i'm still worried on what's the real cause of the problem :/
 

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Sometimes new electronic components are shipped "dead" or fail soon after they are installed. This doesn't happen too often but it does happen. No major manufacturer stress tests each and every component they build, only a random few from each lot. Manufacturers and consumers accept that a certain percentage of electronic components will fail before the end of their service life, which is why we have warranties.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sometimes new electronic components are shipped "dead" or fail soon after they are installed. This doesn't happen too often but it does happen. No major manufacturer stress tests each and every component they build, only a random few from each lot. Manufacturers and consumers accept that a certain percentage of electronic components will fail before the end of their service life, which is why we have warranties.
the gpu was 4 months old and was running smooth until I put it on my new build :(
 

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If the PCI slot has no heat-discolored contacts or singed area in the plastic then it's probably OK. The only way to test it would be with a tester or a another video card.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If the PCI slot has no heat-discolored contacts or singed area in the plastic then it's probably OK. The only way to test it would be with a tester or a another video card.
how to test it with a tester? also the psu how to know if it's fine using a tester? what should be the reading?
 

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Testing a PSU and a PCIe slots using a multimeter and digital test equipment is probably beyond your capabilities unless you are a highly-experienced hobbyist or have formal electronics training. You can purchase test cards and equipment but the cost would be as much as that for new components and it's a waste of money if you are only an occasional builder.

Like I said, I'd probably get a better PSU just to be on the safe side. However, if the shop will stand by their assessment that the PSU is good (ask them if they will reimburse for a new motherboard/video card/PSU if the power supply they "checked" is determined later to be the cause of the problem) then you can try it and see.

Note that your PSU is the lowest end of what has become a mid-tier PSU manufacturer. The only current production Corsair PSUs I'd use myself in a system would be one of the AXi series.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
you are absolutely right .. :(
but i wanna make sure first that my mobo is functioning well and has no problem.. how to do that ?
i'll probably change the psu as soon as possible..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The technical support of the GPU Supplier does not know the cause of this problem in my GPU. Can anyone tell the reason please. :(
 

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The technical support of the GPU Supplier does not know the cause of this problem in my GPU. Can anyone tell the reason please. :(
It's difficult to say what caused an electronic component to fail without having the component in-hand to test and even then one might never know for sure. There are many things that can cause electronic circuitry to fail, including manufacturing defects (in either the individual components themselves or the assembly process [for instance, sloppy soldering]), component aging, power surges, high temperatures, cosmic rays, short circuits due to metallic objects, liquids (including leaky capacitors or sometimes even condensation in a humid environment), insects or other conductive "critters," dust, mold, etc., static electricity, opening of cracks in the solder or circuit traces do to heating/cooling cycles, and so on.

Like I said (or at least implied) before -- making sure that all of the components of a system are of a reasonably high quality goes a long way toward ensuring the stability of the system as a whole. With PCs, the first and foremost subsystem that you want to be of adequate quality and capacity is the power supply unit.
 

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The only way you have to test the PCIe slot besides a visual inspection for burn marks is to install another video card.
As above ^
 

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If a mains power surge was the cause of your problem then you would probably see damage throughout the system, not just in the video card.

If there was too much current delivered to (or grounding from) the PCIe slot you probably will see signs of this in a heat-discolored electrical contact. As the techs here have said, the only thing you can do without specific test equipment and knowledge is to visually inspect the slot's contacts (I'd take a look at the PCIe power supply cable's pins too) and, if they appear to be OK, then try your video card and see.
 
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