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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,

I have an LCD monitor that I am plugging into a desktop computer running Windows 7 Ultimate. The video card is an onboard Intel one. When I plug the screen into the computer, it will come on and look normal for about 3-4 seconds, then it will shut off and stay black. If I unplug it from the computer and plug it back in again, it will come on again just like before and then shut off. While the screen is working, I can hear a soft sound like a fan on the back of the monitor but I wasn't aware that LCD screens had fans. When the screen goes black, the sound stops.

Is the monitor toast or does anyone have an idea? I tried uninstalling the video driver then letting it reinstall itself. I will also look for an updated driver.

Oh yeah, and I am using that computer right now. It works fine on an old CRT monitor which makes me think the LCD is broken.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you think it is something I could open and try to fix like a lose wire? It seems like it couldn't be something to big since the screen actually comes on and shows a good picture before it shuts off.
 

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Hi bushkanaka86 :wave:

It seems as if you've got a component(s) overheating and cutting-out in your monitor. Short of getting a can of 'freezer' and testing every component, being dexterous with a soldering-iron then hassling about to get that exact component, it'll be easier and less time-consuming to either take it to a repair-shop, or replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oops, forgot to check this thread again.

I currently live and work at a hospital in the remote mountains of Papua New Guinea so I am the only repair shop around and buying a new monitor is actually quite expensive since it would have to be shipped over here or bought in country and the prices are outrageous for off brand monitors.

So if I were to try to repair the monitor, what would you recommend. I actually have a can of freezer and a soldering iron. Is there a spot inside the monitor you recommend I begin my work?

Thanks!
 

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It's a long time since I did any component-level repairs, but as you're in a hospital there, 'borrow' a stethoscope and try to pinpoint where the fan-noise is coming from, then use the 'freeze-air' on the components around that area.

It might well be that the component is located on a smaller replaceable board, rather than the main 'motherboard'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sounds like a plan. My wife is a nurse so getting a stethoscope is not a problem. I will try to figure out what is causing the problem.
 

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Sorry I couldn't be more help - Without a circuit-diagram for the specific monitor and a load of digital equipment, it's really hard to find dead/dying components, unless they've actually discoloured or burnt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, no luck. I tried fixing the monitor but I made it worse. Thankfully, the monitor wasn't really working beforehand so it wasn't that big of a deal.

I downloaded the Service Manual for the monitor and took the whole thing apart. The monitor was getting power so I didn't think anything was wrong with the power supply card. I figured either the main board or the screen itself were messing up. The service manual gave instructions on things to test on the main board to find a problem. Everything checked out so I decided to just clean things off, put it back together and try to listen for what was making the sound.

In order to hear the sound better, I decided to just plug everything back in but not attach it to the case so I can see/hear what was wrong. As soon as I plugged the power cable into the screen, there was a spark and a pop and part of the board was black. I didn't know what was wrong and if it needed to be grounded or something so I set the boards on a metal part of the case and plugged in again. Another pop and another spark. I decided to go ahead and screw everything back down and put it all back together except for the plastic casing. I plugged the screen in and nothing happened and it wouldn't turn on.

I am not sure why the board blew but I think it is toast now. I have some spare circuit boards around so I could try to replace the blow parts but I think it probably isn't worth it at this point.
 

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I hope you didn't rest the board on the metal parts when testing, that would likely short-circuit all the solder-connections underneath the board.

Sorry to see the monitor toasted itself, too many electronic gizmos seem to have a built-in self-destruct nowadays, good for 'The Market' but tough on folks' pockets etc.
 
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