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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After Windows 10 tried to update the "Feature Update for Windows 10 version 1909" and failed several times, my HP Envy 17 eventually started turning on and off 9+ times in a row before booting up.


So I tried running a sfc /scannow and I got the message that it was unable to fix corrupt files. so I ran a chkdsk /f / r and that took all night to complete and found errors (no surprise there being that the laptop powers on and off a dozen times before booting) I never had any issues with disk errors AT ALL until this point.


After chkdsk, I found that I am now receiving MULTIPLE system critical errors that include


the code execution cannot proceed because wininet.dll was not found
the code execution cannot proceed because version.dll was not found

I ran an sfc /scannow again and got



cannot find the file specified

I tried dism and got



cannot find the file specified


I even tried dism /source with an ISO and got



the wim contains invalid compressed data




Google has absolutely nothing on.


I tried a repair upgrade and even that reverts because of the repeated off/on at startup
Errors out as 0xC1900101 - 0x20017
The installation failed in the SAFE_OS phase with an error during BOOT operation


Doing a refresh ALWAYS errors out as

there was a problem refreshing your pc


What else is there to do?? I am at a total loss here
 

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First make sure the update didn't install. If it did, delete it. In any case, try System Restore prior to the update.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First make sure the update didn't install. If it did, delete it. In any case, try System Restore prior to the update.



Easier said than done. Settings, search, and start menu also do not open. I do NOT know how to get to system restore otherwise
 

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It sounds like you can boot into Windows and can open file explorer. That being the case, what I'd try is, Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file.

And not to rub salt in an open wound, but if you do not already own an external USB backup drive, and have a full system image, plus a separate user data, backup routine in place you need to get this started as soon as you have your system operational again.

There are times, and this could end up being one of them, where a corruption so severe has occurred, for whatever reason, that there will end up being no way to fix it. The only thing that can save you in that circumstance is having a full system image backup of your system prior to "the catastrophe" from which to restore.
 

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No help at all from here? :(
We're volunteers, and we do have things going on in our lives besides this issue.

Your original post is not even three hours old, and you've already been offered repeated assistance. You need to have a little patience, and will continue to need it as assistants will get to this as they have time available.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It sounds like you can boot into Windows and can open file explorer. That being the case, what I'd try is, Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file.

And not to rub salt in an open wound, but if you do not already own an external USB backup drive, and have a full system image, plus a separate user data, backup routine in place you need to get this started as soon as you have your system operational again.

There are times, and this could end up being one of them, where a corruption so severe has occurred, for whatever reason, that there will end up being no way to fix it. The only thing that can save you in that circumstance is having a full system image backup of your system prior to "the catastrophe" from which to restore.



Again, as I said in my OP,



I tried a repair upgrade and even that reverts because of the repeated off/on at startup
Errors out as 0xC1900101 - 0x20017
The installation failed in the SAFE_OS phase with an error during BOOT operation

Repair upgrade/install from ISO does not work
 

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Repair upgrade/install from ISO does not work
Then you are definitely already at the point where getting your data off of the drive and using one of the following two methods is going to be your only reasonable choice:

Doing a Completely Clean (Re)install of Windows 10 Using Media Creation Tool to Fetch the Win10 ISO File

Doing a Completely Clean (Re)install of Windows 10 Using Media Creation Tool to Create Bootable Win10 Install Media on a USB Thumb Drive

I recently tried to help someone through a crash that had very similar characteristics as yours, and if you cannot get a repair install to work, then the completely clean reinstall, AKA "nuke and pave," is what comes next.

Even if there is some arcane method to get your system "more normal" again without doing so, I'd never for a single moment presume those fixes would stick over time, which is what matters.

Get your data, then reinstall Windows 10 from scratch so that you know you have a clean, stable baseline as the starting point.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
How do I go about that? Can I locate my serial number somewhere within Windows for activation? There is no sticker anywhere on the laptop with a product key



A friend gave me this laptop




Edit: I tried the method in the link but the install just automatically selects to keep everything.


You helped someone with this recently? Is there a bad update from Microsoft out there or something?
 

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You do not need any license or activation key. Provided Windows 10 was installed and activated on any machine, its digital license is maintained on Microsoft servers and fetched as part of the reinstall process.

I do not know what you mean by "selects to keep everything." If you boot from the installation media, which you must to do a completely clean reinstall, you're not going to be asked about keeping anything, or at least you weren't up through Version 1909. This could be something new for Version 2004, but I have not clean installed with Version 2004 yet. If asked, then you keep nothing, and that's assuming you have already offloaded your data, as it will be nuked.

The instructions I posted have been used by, literally, hundreds of people successfully. I cannot get any more explicit in step-by-step directions than I have already been. If these do not suit then do a web search on "completely clean reinstall windows 10" and find a set that makes sense to you.

If you are still able to install any software on your existing crippled system I'd also suggest getting Belarc Advisor and running it to create an inventory of the software you have installed and the keys for same. It makes setting things up again easier on the fresh install.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I just ran it by mounting it and running the setup. I did not see the part that said to boot from the ISO


How do you boot from ISO?





I suspect that the repair install is not working due to the repeated on/off that occurs at boot. It seems to only do this if told to boot from an install like this.
 

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I am not being snarky, but, please, take the time to read the instructions. It is laid out, in as much entirety as it can be, in those instructions.

I do not know, for any random machine, how to boot it into UEFI/BIOS or the one-time change boot order settings. That varies, and you need to look up how to do that for the make and model you have via web search.

You MUST boot from installation media to do a completely clean reinstall. You cannot use the mount command for the ISO. That will only get you into the repair install cycle, and that's not what you want.

If you give your make and model I can at least try to find instructions for getting into changing the boot order. But generally if you web search on make and model, along with the phrase "change boot order" you will find scads of step-by-step instruction sets for your computer.
 

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I knew I'd eventually find this post I made long ago on Bleeping Computer, and here it is:

UEFI Boot Example from HP 15 Series Laptop

This should give you a very good idea, if not exact, of what you'll be seeing once you've done the ESC presses that let you enter UEFI/BIOS. In the case of wanting a one-time change in boot order, you could use the F9 key (or whatever it may be for the UEFI/BIOS on your machine) to get into those options.

In any case, you will eventually land in a screen at least somewhat like the last screen shot I captured in the sequence. On the machine being used there boot was in UEFI mode, not legacy mode. But you can see that no matter which mode the machine might be in, only the active one is presented, and the order of the devices from which the computer will attempt to boot is presented.

Other assistants may appear who may have their own methods of trying to repair the state your system is in, and if they do, you can feel free to follow their advice if you so choose. For myself, the only thing I am going to try to help you to do at this point is a completely clean reinstall. This is, in my experience with cases such as this, best practice.
 

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so I ran a chkdsk /f / r and that took all night to complete and found errors
When Check Disk runs All Night, and then Reports Errors, then it has discovered several Bad Sectors. and they probably can't be "Repaired". You can try to repair the Windows OS but you are always going to have problems until the Drive is replaced. You may not have had Bad Sectors before, but you do now, and your computer won't run well until the drive is replaced.
 

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It is not unusual, in any way, for a hard drive to develop a few bad sectors. Very often these are "soft" bad sectors what will disappear if the drive is completely reinitialized. Other times it's a couple of "hard" bad sectors that can't be repaired.

I have had a single bad sector on the 2TB hard drive on the machine I'm typing from for years now. It's not "going bad" because that single bad sector stays a single bad sector.

If you have bad sectors and keep seeing more bad sectors appear in a short period of time, then you have a drive showing the signs of failure.

If the instructions I gave for doing a completely clean install earlier are followed, the disk will be reinitialized. At that point, after Windows 10 is reinstalled, one should take a look at what chkdsk shows, and if it's just a couple of bad sectors, make a note of the count and check again at, say, weekly intervals for a month or two. If the count increases and/or gathers speed in the amount of increase, the drive is failing. If it doesn't, it isn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Except I am UNABLE to reinstall Windows 10. There is NO usb boot support in the HP Envy 17 BIOS so I am unable to boot via USB




It is the SAME screens but no option anywhere to boot from USB and it DOES NOT do so on its own despite being first on the list. F10 and F9 are both USELESS here


Now what?
 
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