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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've saved quite a bit of websites that have numerous external HD's for sale, and honestly, the only thing that strikes me as important on them is how much space they have and the RPM... So I was curious what other opinions there were on which External hd's are the best to buy on a budget of 100$ :) A good amount of space...


Does it matter if it's IDE or a SATA drive? Or does an external hd not have all that IDE or SATA dilema?

Good and easy storage too, if I wanted to use multiple... They could be stacked or something maybe? *shrugs*

I'm tired, sorry for not making much sense -.-
 

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External drives are all IDE-to-USB or IDE-to-Firewire. Not SATA. You can either buy a ready-to use, ready assembled external drive such as a Seagate or LaCie, or buy a bare drive and an enclosure and assemble it yourself. I took the latter route and made quite a saving -- 300GB bare drive for £60 and an enc. for £20. A ready made one that capacity would have set me back around £100 or more.

The ready made ones are already partitioned and formatted but usually can't be stacked cos thay are mostly vertical design. A bare drive, however, you'll have to partition/format yourself (no big deal), but since you can buy lay-flat enclosures with rubber feet, they do lend themselves to stacking.

One final word if you buy a bare drive. maxtor drives are among the cheapest, which is why many system builders fit them. Why cheapest? -- because their failure rate is higher than the others. If you're trying to save money you may be tempted by their low price --- don't be!
 

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I would recommend the separate route. Buy the hard drive you want and the enclosure you want. Don't fear any of the new Maxtor drives, they are just fine. The big Maxtor problem was with the DiamondMax 9 series, a manufacturing snafu. I would go with a SATA drive and an enclosure that works with SATA. A USB connection is much more universal than firewire, should you ever want to move it around to other machines. That also depends on whether you have a firewire port, anyway. You'll get a better warranty on the hard drive if you go separate.
 

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Western Digital has a good 320GB external that
supports firewire and USB, (or with only USB if you prefer).
And you can stack up these HD horizontal no problem.
They look cool too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Ok, so if I were to buy a seperate HD, and then the encloser, do all of the bits and pieces that you'd need to connect a regular HD to a motherboard come inside of the encloser? And then you just hook everything up inside the enclosure, and you're ready to go? Does the hard drive have a special usb thing on it already?

I don't understand how you put it into an enclosure... And how it would work =\ It's kinda confusing...

So basically you're just putting a regular hd into an enclosure, like a normal external hd might be... But the thing that's confusing me is the chords and all the stuff that would normally go into a "normal" HD...

(What exactly IS firewire?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmmm, so putting an HDD inside of an enclosure would be cheaper... Is there any difference between an External and a regular HDD being put inside the enclosure, besides the fact that it's already assembled for you?

So I've decided that I like this one:
http://westerndigital.com/en/products/products.asp?driveid=133&language=en

When I put it inside of a enclosure and all that... I'll be able to turn it on from the "external" hdd itself right?... All the things a normal External harddrive would do, except the fact that I'm assembling it myself?

(Sorry for the ignorance >_< Never worked with putting them together... Want to varify >_<)
 

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Yes, after you put the hard drive in the enclosure and make all the connections, it will be the same as an external one that you would buy. The big difference usually is that you will get a much better warranty on the hard drive by doing it this way, as most of the external drives you buy come with only a one year warranty on everything.
 
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