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Hey Guys,
First post here and found this site looking for help…

Im wanting to secure a future in IT. I’m really unsure where to start. I’m 39 so would like to get started asap. I have no formal IT qualifications but have lots of experience in troubleshooting windows/software/hardware. Also have experience with DNS.
I’m looking for a career in IT where I could potentially freelance/work self employed eventually.
I would love to work In a support role, rather than a sale role. My dream is to help solve customers tech issues all day long.
Can anyone offer any advice on how to get started? I recently worked for GoDaddy which I thought was going to be a tech support role but ended up being a heavy sales role with hardly any tech support involved.
Any help would be greatly appreciated

thanks
Dan
 

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Team Manager, Microsoft Support
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I have three AAS degrees (Allied Health, Electronics, Natural Resources Technology) and also taught in an AAS program. I'd highly recommend finding a good two-year IT program at a community college near you. It's the best way not only get the basic education and certifications you will need but also will allow you to liaison with people who are working or have worked in the field, as well as potential future employers. The program I taught in had a six-month half-time paid internship too, so all of our students had at least that much experience upon graduation. Certification testing was part of the program as well.

Conversely, you can read the requisite material and take the certification tests on your own. This might get expensive though as you will have to obtain all of the lab equipment and supplies needed for your hands-on studies. It will also be much more difficult to arrange an internship too.

There use to be a guy with a ton of IT certifications and experience as an IT instructor who posted here but I've not seen him around since I came back.

To start out, look at some job listings in your area that you might be interested in and see what qualifications the employers are looking for.
 

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Team Manager - Hardware, Acting Manager, Security
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Becoming an IT is getting harder and harder to do. Degreed candidates can find positions as software IT's in major companies but even there exposure is limited based on what the company does. Seldom would you see enough situations which would see you going off on your own some day because where would you get the hardware experience?
Best advice I can give you is find a way to make a living, and then try to go off on your own part time. Many of us who work in the industry started exactly that way as I did 20 years ago and it really became "learn as you go". My start was even more accidental and I don't know if the situation is the same today but I was President of a homeowner association and it always bothered me that we published a newsletter that went to 170 townhouses and I could have a free ad but didn't know what to say. So one weekend I went in with an ad for pc repair and had 35 calls by the end of the weekend. The fact that I had 35 calls all of which made appointments and 1/2 were not from the development I was advertising to, convinced me there was a need out there so I stumbled into a business without ever realizing it could happen. I stayed part time for several years until I felt strong enough to cast off and go out on my own.
 

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Hey Guys,
First post here and found this site looking for help…

Im wanting to secure a future in IT. I’m really unsure where to start. I’m 39 so would like to get started asap. I have no formal IT qualifications but have lots of experience in troubleshooting windows/software/hardware. Also have experience with DNS.
Hi Dan,

Google for "internship" and see what your local sites have to offer. I know that many places will accept hands-on experience as part of entrance requirements as long as you satisfy other requirements. I've been paying the bills for years as a residential support person and have had unsolicited employment offers from local shops (no thanks). I think the idea of a 2 yr IT program is good, as long as the time and costs aren't prohibitory. I tried to gain more networking experience, but the course here was expensive, 45 mins away, & full-time (I had to earn an income w/two children, so not for me).

Keep looking. You might even attend job fairs (if they have those in UK?) and seek out people in the IT sector for their input. Best to you!
 
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