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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,

I have setup a good amount of Windows 2000, 2003 and some enterprise servers but... I have to say that I have never installed a Linux Server. A Suse Linux at that. I will be starting the installation on Monday (US Eastern) and well... I don't know very much about Linux... Would anyone know the correct steps or maybe a link on how to install a Suse 9 Linux Server? I know its asking a lot but... it's pretty foreign to me and if I could just get a heads up on what to expect that that would be wonderful. Detail is key, because like I said... uh... foreign.?.?.? Thank you all, and I hope someone knows a lot of Linux :eek:).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, this does help me out a lot. I really appreciate it. If anyone else could add anything more or if you have more tips then it would be great to hear from you. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh, I have a question. This is going to be just a Linux system, and well how exactly would I partition it on a server? I know its easier on a PC, but I have never installed Linux on a server before. I know the swap should be relatively fine with default settings but of course I could be wrong because a server does have a lot of memory. Probably just match the swap size with the amount of memory the server has? How many other partitions should I need? I know I need a root partition for... well I'm not to sure what that is... And well... How many partitions do I need. They have weird extensions and such. Like "/dev/sda2" etc... A little help on this would be great... Ha, Thanks guys and sorry about this. This OS is outside the usual Windows atmosphere. thanks.
 

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You need:
1 root partition (where Linux will be installed)
1 Swap. If you have lots of RAM, if you have enough disk space make it the same amount as the RAM in case of a kernel panic it will have enough room.

Here's some partition/hard drive name info:
All devices in Linux are represented as special files within the directory /dev. Partition names in Linux are based on the hard disk type, their position on the IDE or SCSI controller, and their partition number.

IDE hard disks start with "hd", followed by a letter between a and d, which correspond to primary master, primary slave, secondary master and secondary slave, respectively. Thus, if you have a hard disk as primary master this will be called /dev/hda, while a CD-ROM as secondary slave will be /dev/hdd.

For SCSI disks the situation is slightly different. SCSI disks start with "sd", followed by a letter which is assigned according to their order on the SCSI device chain - there is no concept of primary/secondary or master/slave devices in SCSI. Thus the first SCSI hard disk is "/dev/sda", the second would be "/dev/sdb", etc.

In both cases, this is followed by the partition number. Partitions 1 to 4 are the four primary partitions. In a typical dual-boot (Windows/Linux) system, partition 1 will be Windows' drive C:, so this can be accessed as /dev/hda1; while partition 2 (/dev/hda2) will be the extended partition, though this never needs to be accessed directly. Partitions 3 and 4 will be unused, and 5 upwards are the partitions within the extended partition.

Note that if an IDE device is a CD-ROM, it is accessed through the device (eg, /dev/hdc) without any partition numbers. SCSI CD-ROMs are not numbered along with the hard disks, but are given a special prefic ("scd" instead of "sd").
 

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The best way to partition your system is as mentioned - first partition ought to be the root partition. This should be no more than 1 gig. Than swap partition (usually twice the size of your ram, byt may depend on the intended usage) and then /usr and /home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thats awesome. Alright, I finished the installation, I have internet connection but unfortunately no one can check it for me at the moment. I'll keep you guys posted if I did it correct or not. If not, then I will tell you what I did wrong (even though you might not care, I would like to learn from my mistakes.) I want to thank you all for helping me out with this, I was freaked out with this install but in the end... It wasn't that bad at all. Thanks guys!
 

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just a little add-on to the device file names...
SATA drives are registered as if they were SCSI disks, so don't be confused if you see a /dev/sda1 when you're not having any SCSI in your rig! :wink:
 
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