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Discussion Starter #1
Ok i just finished installing Slackware's version of Linux. Its loaded. but its a just a dos prompt login screen. What do i do? how do i get to the windowing view of Linux
 

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Well for starters it's called the terminal or the shell, not a dos prompt.

As for your problem, did you install a gui?

Try typing in "gdm" or "kdm", if nothing comes up then you didn't install a GUI.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The screen says

Welcome to Linux 2.4.29 (tty1)

Darkstar login:

But the problem is that I didn't set any user name or password anywhere during the install. What do i do? is there some sort of default user name and password. HEEELLLLPPPPP
 

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lol, that's the login... you are root... type root then the password if it asks, if not, then you are root, the superuser...
 

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linux idiot here again.

Ok so i am in KDE enviorment. Wondering about in circles. What I want to do is to get apache running on my new linux box. So i thought my first object shoudl be to set up my network. I run a local lan here at my house. Problem is i dont' even know how to set that up. I am soo lost. I need a really good help menu but the help menu seems to be pretty usesless.

Help please
 

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Well your LAN should be autoconfigured by the linux install. As for apache I don't know what kind of package tools slackware has so your probally gonna have to install the hard way.

http://httpd.apache.org/
You'll have to compile from the source and register the services and such.

If you were using a debian based distro however installing apache would be as easy as typing "apt-get install apache"

Just a thought
 

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first off isthere a way to check to see if i have an ip address?

also could you point me in the direction of some instructions on how to compile from the source and registar.....

I am a pretty advanced windows user but I am brand spankin new on linux world. I am trying to expand my computer knowledge so this is my new little project.
 

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Well Slackware is a bit advanced for a newbie with no terminal experience. I'd suggest Ubuntu instead just to get going.


As far as checking your network. Typing in "ifconfig" with no arguments should show your network cards, mac addresses and your ip.


Also if you can get on the internet at all you have an ip.
 

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Sorry, but I'm not even to the level of newbie in linux yet. I'm planning on getting another machine and putting mandrake/mandriva on it but I'm not there yet.

Why is it so important that you create a user other than root and NEVER log into root unless making significant changes. What can you do to mess up your system so much in linux under the root account that you couldn't mess up in another os using a user with admin privilages? Is it good to create something else just because you can?

I apologize for my ignorance in advance.
 

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part of it has to do with the fact that whatever account you are logged into, sets the privledges for any program you run.

you log in as root, and fire up a browser, or anything, and that application has root access without asking for it.

however, if you make a "user" account, and log into that, you will be asked to ok it if a program you are using tries to gain root privledges, and you have a chance to say no.
 

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Sean34993 said:
Why is it so important that you create a user other than root and NEVER log into root unless making significant changes. What can you do to mess up your system so much in linux under the root account that you couldn't mess up in another os using a user with admin privilages? Is it good to create something else just because you can?
It's common sense. Root is "all powerful" and when you delete something on Linux, it's not coming back. There is no Recycle bin where you can restore your files. It's a lot easier to screw something up on Linux than it is on Windows. Running as a less privileged user prevents you from removing important system files or worse.

Here is one of the many Beginning Linux guides on the net which also explains why you shouldn't run as root.

Two other links you might find useful are the Linux Newbie Administrator Guide and the Linux Documentation Project.
 
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