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Using Google to solve problems
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the laptop screen needs to be replaced at least. There may be other water damage to the motherboard that an expert should check out.
 

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The problem with electrically conductive liquids inside of electronic equipment is they allow electrical currents to travel across unintended paths. This can immediately damage/kill the electronic components those improper currents traveled through.

In order to find out exactly what might have been damaged and where would not only require all of the proper testing equipment, the knowledge required to use it all as well as to perform the tests on each and every single isolated electronic part. Next you need to find new replacements for all of those components and then proceed with reassembling, by hand, the entire device. Of course the cost of all of this would far and away exceed the cost purchasing a new device.
 

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Unless this is a very special and expensive laptop, it's time for a replacement. As stated, it's almost certain the repair costs will exceed the value of the laptop.
 

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Team Manager, Microsoft Support
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For future reference, don't power up a wet laptop. Remove the battery. Now lazy me was going to type further instructions, but it was easier to Google and this is what Digital Trends said to do:
Step 1: Remove all easily detachable components. Unplug your mouse and any cables, and remove any flash drives and DVDs. Leave your laptop bare.
Step 2: Dry the outside of your machine. Open your laptop as far as it goes, hold it upside down to let any accumulated liquid drain out, and use an absorbent towel or a lint-free absorbent fabric to wipe wet surfaces until they're dry. Do not try to dry the computer with forced hot air from a heat gun or hair-dryer.
Step 3: At this point, we recommend that you take advantage of the warranty if it's still applicable or take your machine to a repair shop. If your brand has a designated repair store (like Apple), give them a call or take it in. Otherwise, look for local repair stores that specialize in your laptop brand.
Step 4: The type of liquid that was spilled matters. Water is the least acidic, while sugary and alcoholic fluids are more conductive and more corrosive. They can quickly cause permanent damage to your internal components. Either way, the goal is to mitigate their effects as much as possible by drying the computer immediately. If you don't want to have a professional take a look at it for you, though, there are more steps you can take to try and dry your machine out. However, please take note that neither Digital Trends nor the author is responsible for any damage caused to your PC by taking it apart.


I'll now add that you can use a fan to help dry and I wouldn't try to restart for at least 3 days.
 

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If you spill something like soda or an alcoholic drink on it, I've found that quickly removing as much as you can and actually washing the main board and keyboard gives you the best chance of recovery. Something like Coke will very quickly ruin the circuit board or keyboard, then there's no coming back. I've washed a number of laptop keyboards that had spills, that has been very successful. It's harder to disassemble to get to the motherboard, but plain water will not damage them if you can wash them, the key is drying them before you reassemble.
 

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Only thing I'd add to what John has said, is that if you need to wash electical items, if you can, use distilled/de-ionised water as it is non-conductive and is therefore less likely to cause further damage.

Tap water contains additives which make it conductive.
 

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For future reference, don't power up a wet laptop. Remove the battery. Now lazy me was going to type further instructions, but it was easier to Google and this is what Digital Trends said to do:
Step 1: Remove all easily detachable components. Unplug your mouse and any cables, and remove any flash drives and DVDs. Leave your laptop bare.
Step 2: Dry the outside of your machine. Open your laptop as far as it goes, hold it upside down to let any accumulated liquid drain out, and use an absorbent towel or a lint-free absorbent fabric to wipe wet surfaces until they're dry. Do not try to dry the computer with forced hot air from a heat gun or hair-dryer.
Step 3: At this point, we recommend that you take advantage of the warranty if it's still applicable or take your machine to a repair shop. If your brand has a designated repair store (like Apple), give them a call or take it in. Otherwise, look for local repair stores that specialize in your laptop brand.
Step 4: The type of liquid that was spilled matters. Water is the least acidic, while sugary and alcoholic fluids are more conductive and more corrosive. They can quickly cause permanent damage to your internal components. Either way, the goal is to mitigate their effects as much as possible by drying the computer immediately. If you don't want to have a professional take a look at it for you, though, there are more steps you can take to try and dry your machine out. However, please take note that neither Digital Trends nor the author is responsible for any damage caused to your PC by taking it apart.


I'll now add that you can use a fan to help dry and I wouldn't try to restart for at least 3 days.
This has worked for me and some friends, with phones, tablets, laptops and so-on:

Yup, whip the battery and everything else attached out, and then sling the thing, opened up if possible, into a sack of uncooked white rice.

Also worked on all the ECU-type things in a drowned Honda Accord wagon.

Rice is cheap, and if it doesn't work then you have enough rice left over to make saki, and you can drown your sorrows...
 

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Here is how the screen looks:
The laptop was in the bag after i was coming back from class and it was raining, so the bag likely got wet and it affected the laptop. The laptop can power up but it shuts down when it leave it open to try to do something. Can you help me plz, I like this laptop
I would put it in the fridge over night, any moisture will be pulled out.
 

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Team Manager, Microsoft Support
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Even a frost free fridge would not be as good an idea as the sure drying methods mentioned including using rice. Remember, the user usually has one shot because when powering up a wet unit, there's a good chance of not getting another chance.
 

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Even a frost free fridge would not be as good an idea as the sure drying methods mentioned including using rice. Remember, the user usually has one shot because when powering up a wet unit, there's a good chance of not getting another chance.
Temps in a fridge is 36 and won't freeze anything. But the humidity is zero and will pull all the moisture out of anything. will not hurt anything and if it's really broken???
 
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