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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there. I have a Lenovo Legion Y520, which is almost 3 years old (and also out of its warranty period).

It was showing some heat issues, so I reapplied the thermal paste on it. However, after everything was done and over, the laptop now refuses to turn on. Pressing the power button does the following:

1. Keyboard backlight lights up
2. Fans spin for 2 seconds and then turn off
3. Any peripherals connected don't get power
4. Hard Drive spins

I don't know what went wrong since I also followed the proper steps during the reapplying process.
 

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Clean and reapply thermal paste.
 

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Did you reapply the thermal paste at all the right places?
Usually in laptops the heat sink shares touching points to at least 2 chips.

So if you took the heatsink off, and just applied thermal paste to the CPU, it is possible that you don't have a good contact to the heat sink with another chip.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Clean and reapply thermal paste.
I already did that. Maybe I should change my thermal paste to a better one this time?

Take apart again make sure everything is fully seated ribbon cables might not be in all the way
I didn't take out that many cables. The ones I did, I put back in correctly. I'll do that again.

Did you reapply the thermal paste at all the right places?
Usually in laptops the heat sink shares touching points to at least 2 chips.

So if you took the heatsink off, and just applied thermal paste to the CPU, it is possible that you don't have a good contact to the heat sink with another chip.
Yeah I applied the thermal paste to both the CPU and the GPU.
 

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Take apart again make sure everything is fully seated ribbon cables might not be in all the way
I didn't take out that many cables. The ones I did, I put back in correctly. I'll do that again.
Reseat the RAM. Remove the CMOS battery for at least 15 minutes, if all is done and it still fails to boot, then the motherboard got shorted in the process and will need to be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Reseat the RAM. Remove the CMOS battery for at least 15 minutes, if all is done and it still fails to boot, then the motherboard got shorted in the process and will need to be replaced.
I'll try that.
If the motherboard was shorted, what reason would that be for?
 

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Static electricity while taking it apart or putting it back together
 

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Before you give up, try to replace the CMOS battery.
I literally had the exact same behavior on a PC, when I unplugged it from power after a long time plugged in.
Somehow the CMOS was dead but still working like a zombie, and as soon as I unplugged the power-source (PSU) from the mainboard, it didn't work anymore.

In my case the CMOS was working for many months, even dead until I unplugged the PC from the power-source (PSU / or in your case battery).
So, if you are giving up this laptop, try to replace the CMOS battery, as it is very cheap. And it is never bad to have one extra at home.
 

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I have found dust removal solves almost all laptop cooling issues when laptops get into the 3 to 5 year old range. Put a crevice tool on a decent vacuum cleaner on top of the slots the cooling fan exhausts air (usually out the back of the laptop) and with the vacuum cleaner operating and adding suction, (with the computer running) internal dust comes right out without having to disassemble and risk static electric discharges if you don't have an anti-static work station.
 

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Hi there. I have a Lenovo Legion Y520, which is almost 3 years old (and also out of its warranty period).

It was showing some heat issues, so I reapplied the thermal paste on it. However, after everything was done and over, the laptop now refuses to turn on. Pressing the power button does the following:

1. Keyboard backlight lights up
2. Fans spin for 2 seconds and then turn off
3. Any peripherals connected don't get power
4. Hard Drive spins

I don't know what went wrong since I also followed the proper steps during the reapplying process.
Have you tried a laptop cooling pad? I had a similar problem (over heating and shutting down) with my laptop and put it on a cooling pad and it has worked fine since.
 

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I have found dust removal solves almost all laptop cooling issues when laptops get into the 3 to 5 year old range. Put a crevice tool on a decent vacuum cleaner on top of the slots the cooling fan exhausts air (usually out the back of the laptop) and with the vacuum cleaner operating and adding suction, (with the computer running) internal dust comes right out without having to disassemble and risk static electric discharges if you don't have an anti-static work station.
I was always told that vacuuming a PC creates static. Don't know it its the same for a laptop, but I fear it would be.
Heres an article supporting that theory.
 

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I already did that. Maybe I should change my thermal paste to a better one this time?


I didn't take out that many cables. The ones I did, I put back in correctly. I'll do that again.


Yeah I applied the thermal paste to both the CPU and the GPU.
OK, the first thing I thought of by your description of the problem was that the switching power supply is bad. I'd get another power supply and try that first. You probably have a few about and as long as it has enough power you can test it by bypassing the suspected power supply. If it is the problem either try to repair the power supply or buy a new one.

Second, I have seen many repaired devices that had far too much thermal paste. The bottom line with this stuff is if you can see extra paste you're using far too much. The idea of this stuff is to fill in the microscopic dips not to apply a layer so thick that the part floats on the stuff. If it is floating on this stuff you're going to damage the part by over heating it. That much paste will act as an insulator compared to the part touching the heat-sink which is what a heat-sink is for, being touched so that heat transfers from the part to the heat sink and gets taken away from the part.
 
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