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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, thanks in advance for your help
I'm not really tech smart as far as the inner workings of computers, so apologies for my use of descriptions instead of official names where I'm not fully confident on certain areas.

My laptop has 2 inbuilt drives, a smaller C drive (250GB) and a larger D drive (1TB). When transferring between these two drives, it acts like an external drive transfer (takes time etc), hopefully that helps with the understanding of the types of drives.

Currently my D drive is extremely slow when accessing files, and some of them are only partially accessable (videos play but the file can't be moved to C drive, for example). This D drive also contains my game installations and as such, they're also slow and crash quite often.

I've completed a disc cleanup, a defrag of both drives and a virus scan. As I want to preserve the files and I'm worried about losing them, I've been uploading as many as possible to my OneDrive, though some of them have the aformentioned issue of bringing up errors when attempting to move them.

I've included screenshots of info that may be of use, I'm sorry if anything is missing or any of this is irrelevant. My main focus here is trying to save the files, with a secondary focus on trying to save the laptop. I'm purchasing a new PC this week.

My laptop is a Novatech Nspire, bought in 2014. It's held up reasonably well until the 2nd to last Call of Duty: Warzone patch, when my D drive vanished. I restarted the laptop and everything came back. On the most recent patch for that same game, the same issue happened where my D drive disappeared. I restarted and it still wasn't there, I restarted again and it came back, however with these new issues. It could be a coincidence, however I've never experienced this issue in 8 years of owning this laptop, except immediately following the patching of this game. Do you think it's related?

Thank you so much for your help

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Global Moderator
Electronic Design
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I think it's time to do a SMART check of the drives and see if one of them is failing. I'd also seriously consider an external back up drive, if you've lived for eight years without backup, you're living on borrowed time!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What about a scan of C Drive?
C seems to have no problems. It’s never disappeared and all the same scans/defrags come out clean.

I think it's time to do a SMART check of the drives and see if one of them is failing. I'd also seriously consider an external back up drive, if you've lived for eight years without backup, you're living on borrowed time!
Luckily I’ve moved a lot of my stuff to external drives over the years, it’s just stuff from the past 8 months on there currently.
Just learnt about SMART checks, thanks! Came up clean for both drives
 

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TSF Moderator , Hardware Team , Networking Team
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First do a test on how long it takes to copy say a 5GB file from one drive to the other and jot down the results.

Then temporarily boot and run a different Operating System from a Live CD, DVD, or USB flash drive, do the same test and compare the results.

A Live CD/DVD or USB flash drive contains a complete bootable computer operating system (OS). When you boot a computer from it, the OS loads into, and then runs from memory instead of a hard drive. This allows you to run an OS without installing it or making any changes to a computer's current configuration.

To create one, download an ISO file containing the OS you want to use, (such as Zorin, Ubuntu, or Slax, then use something like ISO Recorder to burn it to a CD/DVD or Rufus to burn to ita USB flash drive/key.

Now boot your computer from this disc/key and your computer will be running that OS instead of the one on your HDD/SSD​

Now do the same test you did in Windows and compare the results. Then remove the Linux Live CD/DVD/USB flash drive and simply reboot your PC from the hard drive/SSD like you do now.

If the problem persists even when running a different OS, then the issue is -- more than likely -- hardware related.
 
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