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So, first off, hi all. Ive used this forum in the past but forgot my old account and so here I am again. As I remember, the people here were always quite helpful.

The issue at hand is a power-related one. Initially, I had trouble charging the laptop but it was still possible with a bit of effort. But it was getting harder to make work with time so i sent it back to Dell for a new motherboard as it was still under warranty. Long story short, They beat around the bush, sending me a new charger that wasnt even the right one, and the warranty expired before it arrived, they told me nothing was replaced. However, the motherboard WAS replaced and my computer was returned to me completely unable to charge and I was told the battery had somehow died in transit. Customer service was rude and unhelpful. I bought a replacement battery and - surprise! - it didn't work. I don't even want to bother calling those fools again. So here I am with a laptop which is tethered to a wall, getting excessively hot and therefore slowing down the longer its run. Its not like I have the money to go just buy a new laptop, so this is what I'm stuck with.

So, naturally I opened the thing up to check it out, and did some research..
When I initially got it back, the remaining charge in the battery could power the computer but it would not charge. Once it died, it stayed dead. With the new battery, It showed the charge but wouldn't even power the computer.
When powered on, a screen saying something like 'the battery type could not be identified' shows up.

So, this is what i think: After opening it up and inspecting all the solder connections surrounding the power supply, i noticed the power jack itself looked pretty normal. However, the solder that connects the pins that attach the battery to the motherboard looks quite brown and abnormal. I think this is the cause of the problem.

My question, then, is this: could this issue be fixed by re-soldering this connection, or will that likely just be a big waste of time? Because for all the research I did I never found anything related to such an issue. Are any other things I can do to identify the root cause? Any other insights into this problem would be much appreciated as well, especially those related to decreasing the excess heat generated by the lack of a battery.

Thanks for reading!
 

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What model Dell?

Are you using a known good power adapter?

If battery and power adapter are working it would appear that you have a fault with the motherboard.
 

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The "brown and abnormal" look around your power jack might be from two things. Either Dell replaced your power jack (hence your new power adapter) or your new power adapter has burnt out your connection. Sometimes adding solder might help but that is only a short term solution.
Here is an insert from a Wiki page that might help you, if you are using an Inspiron.

Dell Inspiron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Most Dell laptop computers have a special external power supply (PSU) which cannot be replaced by a third-party universal supply. The PSU has a chip which produces a special signal identifying the PSU as by Dell and specifying its power, and a special 3-pin connector (minus, plus, and ID). If a power supply not made by Dell is used, and the cable near the connector becomes damaged as is not infrequent after some use, the battery stops charging and the CPU runs slower, although the computer can be used indefinitely so long as it remains plugged in. If this problem is present at startup the message "The AC power adapter type cannot be determined. Your system will operate slower and the battery will not charge" is displayed. This will continue until the external PSU is replaced. A few third-party suppliers make power supplies with specific provision for Dell computers at lower prices than Dell's. It is possible to work round the slowdown, but not the battery charging, by installing a CPU clock utility.[18] On some models (the 9100 for instance), the problem can be worked around by starting the computer without a battery installed and fitting the battery after the computer has booted.
 
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