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· Super Moderator, Editor, Articles Team
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I've got a condenser tumble dryer, a little more expensive but wasn't practical to have a dryer on an external wall and saved the expense of a core drill for the outlet. All the moisture goes into a tank which is like a drawer that you pull out to empty once full. Very pleased with it.
 

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"If you are venting your dryer into your home, you need to stop doing so. Indoor dryer vents are not safe. They can cause health problems due to a build-up of mold and structural damage due to the increased humidity. They can also be a fire hazard as the lint they spew into the air is highly flammable."​

Well there is an exhaust fan in the ceiling that is also active when drying.
After 18 years, no mould. I've yet to see lint "spewed into the air". The only fire hazard is the one you also suffer from and that is lint build up in the filter. The filter in my case is in the front centre of the dryer and is easily pulled off and cleaned after/before any cycle. It's a 30 year old machine and, due to not much use, still almost pristine. It is being replaced by an integrated washer/dryer which, from research, is more likely to catch fire than the stand alone unit.
I'll leave that here now as I have taken this thread way off topic and been absolutely no help to the opening poster.
 

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Even in our permission to do almost anything County, it's against code to vent into house. Frankly, I never heard of anyone ever doing this.
 

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Even in our permission to do almost anything County, it's against code to vent into house. Frankly, I never heard of anyone ever doing this.
I work in the building supply industry and have never heard of such a code in Australia.
Unless of course you are using a gas fired dryer, a very rare thing here. I've never seen a domestic gas fired dryer though they do exist in industrial situations.
 

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OP's dryer is propane.
Well there you go.
As I say, I'm very unfamiliar with that type of dryer. Just no need for them here.
I hope anyone operating one of these in a domestic situation also has a carbon monoxide alarm nearby. I just installed a coupe of Google Nest smoke alarms that also do monoxide.
Highly recommended.

This happened a decade ago near a place we used to live.
 

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I don't understand how you guys don't get that these dryers are electric, have lint filters, are located in a separate room that can be closed off.
I think walking down the street in any large American city would be more harmful to your lungs than the dryers we use.
And, as I've stated, our weather means we are unlucky to use a dryer maybe 10 times a year.
As far as building codes go, we are very regulated here. But there are no regulations for venting of electric clothes dryers. For good reason.

Basic dryer models will only give you one venting option - through the front of the machine. This option is fine if your laundry has an inbuilt exhaust fan or a window - otherwise you will find that the room becomes hot and damp whenever the dryer is in use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
A simple magnet on my vent flap eliminates all your concerns, and it's very easy to use.

I replaced the thermistor and then ran a cycle on permanent press. The load dried properly with no problems. I then ran a load of a couple of towels on the towel setting, and the dryer shut off before the towels were dry. I then set it to permanent press, and it still shut off early. I then set it to knit/delicate and had the same results. I ran it on air only. Some moisture left the towels, and the dryer cooled down. I then attempted the knit/delicate cycle again. It ran longer, than previously, but still stopped early. I ran it again, and the towels were fairly dry.
It appears there are 4 other parts that might be causing the problem (unless the new thermistor is defective).
Sensor – Pressure #3407033
Electrode, Sensor #3387223 (possibly moisture sensor)
Thermostat (high limit 205°F) #3388697
Sensor, Radiant #338906
Since the dryer does shut off when hot, I’m sensing it is probably either the Electrode, Sensor or the Sensor, Radiant, as there is nothing I can see that might raise the pressure, and the dryer does get hot. What are your thoughts on this?
 

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A simple magnet on my vent flap eliminates all your concerns, and it's very easy to use.
That would be incorrect, since there are multiple flaps in most of these vents. Also, even if you have the right design flap that doesn't solve the issue. If the magnet is strong enough to resist the birds prying it open, it's likely strong enough to prevent the driver air pressure from opening it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
My vent has a single flap, and, as I previously stated, I remove the magnet when I use the dryer and replace it after I finish drying. It works very well. I wish I could say the same of the dryer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I designed my home to be convenient, very much unlike engineers who design for their own convenience and don't consider the end-user. For instance, who in their right mind believes the most convenient place to locate a vehicle fuel pump and filter is inside the gas tank?
 

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Since the dryer does shut off when hot, I’m sensing it is probably either the Electrode, Sensor or the Sensor, Radiant, as there is nothing I can see that might raise the pressure, and the dryer does get hot. What are your thoughts on this?
Back on track. Since Barry indicated parts already replaced, which part is still needed?
 
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