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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings
I have a HP Pavilion pc with a Asus IPIBL-LA motherboard running American Megatrends v5.15 bios on Windows 7. Currently it is hardwired to Centurylink's modem supporting fiber optics. I'm getting terrible speeds averaging 80 Mbps download. Suspecting an issue with the onboard network card, I tested out a pcie network card on a dfferent pc resulting in speeds of 700 Mbps download.
Unfortunately the slow pc will not boot up after installing the card in a PCI Express x 1 slot. I get nothing after hitting the power button. It'll fire up fine after removing the card. I changed the onboard video card assignment to the pcie expansion slot but it didn't change anything.
Thanks for reviewing and any help offered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Intel Gigabit CT PCI-E Network Adapter EXP19301CTBLK.
All I can tell you is that it tested out perfectly in a pc that's 3 years older that the HP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Only option I've found was to disable onboard lan which did nothing for my problem.
 

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Weird. Wonder if it's Windows?

Try temporarily booting and running a different Operating System from a Live CD/USB:

A Live CD/DVD or USB flash drive contains a complete bootable computer operating system (OS). When you boot a computer from it, the OS loads into, and then runs from memory instead of a hard drive. This allows you to run an OS without installing it or making any changes to a computer's current configuration.

To create one, download an ISO file containing the OS you want to use, (such as Ubuntu, Slax or Zorin), then use something like ISO Recorder to burn it to a CD/DVD or Rufus to burn to a USB flash drive/key.

Now boot your computer from this disc/key and your computer will be running that OS instead of the one on its hard drive.​

When you're done testing, remove the Linux Live DVD/USB and simply reboot your PC from the hard drive/SSD like you do now.

If the problem persists even when running a different OS, then the issue is -- more than likely -- hardware related.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Weird. Wonder if it's Windows?

Try temporarily booting and running a different Operating System from a Live CD/USB:

A Live CD/DVD or USB flash drive contains a complete bootable computer operating system (OS). When you boot a computer from it, the OS loads into, and then runs from memory instead of a hard drive. This allows you to run an OS without installing it or making any changes to a computer's current configuration.​
To create one, download an ISO file containing the OS you want to use, (such as Ubuntu, Slax or Zorin), then use something like ISO Recorder to burn it to a CD/DVD or Rufus to burn to a USB flash drive/key.​
Now boot your computer from this disc/key and your computer will be running that OS instead of the one on its hard drive.​

When you're done testing, remove the Linux Live DVD/USB and simply reboot your PC from the hard drive/SSD like you do now.

If the problem persists even when running a different OS, then the issue is -- more than likely -- hardware related.
The thing is the pc totally dead after installing the network card. The only thing that light's up is the led on the psu.
 

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Ruh roh! :eek:

What I'd do is take it back down to bare bones out on a table. Nothing but:
  • motherboard (on a non-conductive surface)
  • CPU (w/heatsink & fan)
  • RAM
  • PSU
  • video (including monitor)
  • keyboard and mouse

Now see if it will boot into the BIOS/UEFI. If not, try a different PSU and/or RAM. Once you do get into the BIOS/UEFI reset it to factory defaults.


If it's bootable now, try running an Operating System (*nix) from a bootable USB flash drive. Exercise it some (web) and then leave it running overnight.


If it's still where you left it the night before, power down, hook up your drive with Windows on it and try the same, (exercise it, web, games, whatever), and leave it running overnight.


If it's fine the next morning, power down and reassemble everything back in the case. As you continue beyond the bare minimum though, only add one or two pieces of hardware at a time and then test to make sure what was added isn't causing problems. You get the idea ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pretty involved process luckily I have another pc that's actually newer that I think I'll setup. After all the hours researching, I've come to the conclusion that it's hardware but thanks Doc for your suggestions.
 

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