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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Gang,
I recently had a PS problem that trashed 2 HDDs. I've pretty much written off the data that was lost, but thought I might have a little fun.
Anyone ever removed the disk from one Hdd, and transplanted it into a different drive/housing? I really don't have anything to lose, but if I could make it work long enough to get the data off of it, well, that would be a story to tell.
Thanx In Advance,
The Wannabe Surgeon,
Steven
 

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Yeah I have, several times... after I trashed the first 10 or 15 of them :) But then that's what I do for a living LOL. If you are going to attempt this, don't 'pretty much' have written off the data, write it off completely.
First of all are they the EXACT same model numbers? If so, then list all the information as far as identifying numbers and information on the labels of the drives. If they are multi platter drives, then the platters must be removed together, with no shifting of rotational position at all, even a micron, and the data is gone. Also wear powder free nitrile ( latex would work but not as well ) gloves to avoid fingerprints. You will need a relatively clean area to work - this is generally done in a class 100 or better clean room - opening in normal air the drive may last a year, might last 40 seconds.
Before removing the platters, you need to get the head stack backed off the platter, without letting the heads drag across the platters, and without letting the heads themselves slap together when they come off the platter - *hint* they will always try to do that! There are some you tube videos showing the process. Just remember most of the people you see doing the videos are recovery pros, who have done hundreds or thousands of these procedures. It looks easy in their hands.
Now if you really want a chance at getting your data back, we can look into the potential of fixing/swapping the PCBs - usually where the problems are found if PS problems are involved. It may be as easy as unsoldering two diodes from teh PCB - which a LOT easier and safer than a platter swap!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanx, I guess trying to replace the PCB is smarter. And, I considered that at one time, but couldn't find a board even remotely close. I have about 40 used drives around here, ranging from 10 GB to 180 GB and not two are the same. So where would I go to find a replacement board. The drive is a Seagate 80GB, and I know I'll need all the numbers and such off the old drive. Not a prob there, so where would I go next.
Thanx,
Steven
 

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Lots of sources on the net for donor drives, best to buy the whole drive, then verify it's intefrity- make sure the donor works so you know the board is good. For seagates you need to match
Model number exact
Firmware match exact
Site code must match date within a few eeeks either way ( there are online apps to decode the Seagate date code )
configuration code/level if the drive has them should match
To find vendors google used hard drive and start calling. You might find a match on EBay, but they may also send you a drive with different numbers than you were looking for.
What was the power supply issue that caused the failure? Do the drives spin up at all? If they spin are they making any noise?
Post a couple of clear closeup pics of the circuit board, both sides, as well as the model number (ST######## format ) and we'll see if we can get this spinning for recovery without buying a donor. There are two diodes on teh PCB near the power connector that are TVS )transient voltage surpressor ) diodes. They may or may not appear damaged - cracked, swelled or scorched - their job is to protect other components on the board and the preamp inside from overvoltage and spikes. These devices shunt voltage to ground when their breakdown voltage is reached, and if they burn closed, then there is always a short on the power supply. All you need to do is unsolder the damaged device(s) from the board and the drive will spin up. The caveat is get your data, since the next spike will hit more sensitive components now that the protection has been removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanx For The Insight. I'll save this email so I can address it in the near future. The original problem was brand new 500W Power Supply, right out of the box. Hooked it all up before I found out that all the 4-pin connectors providing power to HDDs, CD/DVD drives, were all wired exactly backwards from the way were supposed to be. So power entered the drives where it shouldn't have. I tried to get the supplier of the PS to pay for the damage, and well, you can guess where things went from there.
I'll be in touch a little later, and I know how to reach you. Have a great evening, and thanx again.
Steven
 
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