Tech Support banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need to know how to secure my computer its the main computer in my basement.Theres two others in the two rooms of two :deveous: teenagers.I want to secure my computer from them,all the while I would like to be spying on them!!!!!Whats the best software for spying thats not at a corporate price???And how do I prevent adminestraighter rights from being accessed on this wireless network???Please help!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
To secure your computer add a password to all your accounts including the administrator. If you don't want them to make any changes on the router just password protect the router and they won't be able to change any of the wireless settings on the router unless they know the password.

Why would you want to spy on them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
phubeone said:
To secure your computer add a password to all your accounts including the administrator. If you don't want them to make any changes on the router just password protect the router and they won't be able to change any of the wireless settings on the router unless they know the password.

Why would you want to spy on them?
Because they are'nt old enough to fear strangers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
are you trying to monitor where they are going and trying to stop them to logging on certain websites and instant messengers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
phubeone said:
are you trying to monitor where they are going and trying to stop them to logging on certain websites and instant messengers?
yes!! and im not ever sure what they are doing!!!Its a sad balance but I cant trust them yet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,285 Posts
My netgear router and others have the ability to block sites, services or just let them be used at certain times. I do not put the kids computer in their bedroom or anywhere else were they can not be watched.

You can also use programs called keyloggers that will show you everywhere they go and everything they type.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
VNC, or the better, tight VNC (www.tightvnc.com) is very simple to use and let's one client machine (yours) view a server machine any other machine on the network. I find it very useful for keeping an eye on my daughter on messenger!

I t is a sad fact of life these days that it is VERY easy for a child to be tricked into meeting someone on the internet who may not be who they claim to be. While you can't ban kids from using the net, they need supervision, even if this has to be slightly intrusive.
 

·
TSF Enthusiast
Joined
·
6,298 Posts
How old are these teenagers?

Another sad fact- when they find out about what you put on their computers- and they most likely will- they won't trust you anymore. That's if they don't figure it out immediately and remove it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
kids finding out

Fox I dont think they will as they are limited in their computer skills at thia time.And I wont need to spy as soon as I see that they are listening to me.If you tell a kid not to open a door,he or she is then compelled to see whats hiding behind door number one!Im not going to invade any more of their privacy as soon as I see that their being smart in their internet choices.Thanks for your sugestions folks!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
Hey kids don't not trust parents anyway. I agree about not putting computers in kids rooms. Too many stories about the kids on the machines at 2-3 a.m. Kids never believe their parents until it is too late and they are already in a bind. Then it is "I told you so" time.

You might start by review the Internet Browser history. Some routers give you a log of sites visisted. This will give you an idea as to what they have been up to. Chat and IM is a big issue, this is where a lot of the problems start. Do not have a good solution for this at the moment.

Another thing to watch with kids, they click everything that shows up on a desktop. You should really clean these computers up, make sure you have firewalls, anti-virus, pop-up blockers. Once the machines have been hit with adware/malware, all kinds of trash pops up that they do not even request. Lots of porn and links to porn. This is really unfair to the kids as they sometimes did not even go looking for this crap. Then as a parent you may fall in the trap of thinking this is what the kids spend their time doing, when it fact it is the adware/malware doing this.

You really have to become a network admin to really curb this stuff. I have a friend that runs his own servers in the house (web and mail) to curtail what the kids are up to. He also sets up all web mail accounts so he can monitor them as well. This is a little over the top and I can tell you the kids just get into trouble away from the computers because of all of this network overkill.

Good luck, being a parent is not any easier with all this technology!!

JamesO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Don't spy. You'll be fighting a losing battle. The minute they find out you're spying (which will happen VERY quickly), they'll just find a way around it or go over to a friend's house.

Best to keep it in the open. Let them know you're concerned, but don't nitpick or be heavy-handed about it. Keep the lines of communication open.

I like the suggestion of no computers in the bedrooms. Even if they are in the bedrooms, spend a lot of time there. Look over their shoulders a lot, and if you see something that worries you, don't come down on them like a ton of bricks. Talk about it and explain your concerns without moralizing too much. Explain how things are dangerous rather than "WRONG".

Now, just because I say to not be heavy-handed doesn't mean you have to be wishy-washy about it. They'll rebel at being watched or talking about it. Here is where you set limits. Be very clear that you're willing to be open and tolerant about what they do, give them freedoms, but the cost is that they simply have to talk about where they're going and who they're talking to. Just like going out socially. It's an easy thing to do and gives them lots of freedom. The alternative is cutting off internet connections, locking phone lines, grounding, and all the other oppressive stuff. Then give them the choice of having some nice talks on a regular basis and letting you look at their screen when they're online, or having a nightmare battle of wills that will probably last the rest of their lives. Kids are pretty smart. They'll take the option that gets them what they want to do.

The other side of the coin is that you need to be tolerant. As I said before, don't nitpick. If they'll talk about it, don't bar them from sites or people simply on the basis that you don't like them. They may have no redeeming value and conflict with your values, but you need to choose your battles. Save your conflicts for the really dangerous things. Besides, talking about your values and how certain sites conflict (and why) without banning them gives your kids the opportunity to learn about values and doesn't instantly make them oppose them.

Teenagers should also know clearly that assault, rape, robbery, and death are direct and very likely consequences of either meeting strangers or worse, telling them where they live. But don't declare them with fire and brimstone like they're punishments for immoral Internet acts. Express concern for your kids' well being and explain the adverse consequences as reasons for your concern.

Teenagers can take the truth about the consequences. Don't be afraid to talk about rape (and also less violent forms of sexual coercion) to either a girl or a boy teenager; it happens to both, and is just as damaging to either. If they don't know why you're so concerned, they won't understand what this is all about. Also discuss how everyone lies on the Internet. They've probably already done a fair bit of misrepresentation themselves if they've been in chat rooms or discussion lists. (It's the first thing I did when I got a C.B. as a teenager in the 70's.)

My $0.02 as a parent (fairly successful so far) and amateur psychologist.

- The Inspector
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I have teenage daughters with computers in their bedrooms. I have a netgear router which I have set up to block msn on a schedule, I let them have it on for a couple of hours in the afternoons. I can also check the logs of the router if I want. But in general I trust them and don`t want to spy on
them. My main concern is msn takes too much time away from their school work but we seem to have reached an agreeable compromise.

Seems to be working ok. :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
Does your router shut off MSN at a specific time. My understanding is some routers cannot close a IM, Chat or Web connection once it is open, but can keep the link from connecting after the timer has changed state.

JamesO
 

·
TSF Enthusiast
Joined
·
6,298 Posts
I'd bet it just disables the port(s) MSN uses...
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top