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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently encountered a HUGE problem. Everytime I turn my computer on, Goback starts to load and then says "Please wait", only to give me an error message 5 minutes later (error 0x1) saying that my system has become unstable and I need to restart, and the cycle repeats. I found a patched Goback that does not exhibit this problem but I need some way of bypassing Goback to get into Windows ME to disable or uninstall Goback.

You can only get into safe mode after goback loads so I can't do that

If I hit the spacebar, it just says PLEASE WAIT and I get the same error message.

I've also tried using Windows 98 boot disks but I'm not skilled in DOS prompts so if anyone knows how I can get into Windows ME or delete/disable/uninstall Goback using one...I would love some ideas.


PLEASE HELP!

P.S. - Reinstalling Windows is NOT an option, I need everything on my hard drive!
 

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TSF Team Emeritus , Microsoft Visiting Expert
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Hi LittleD

Try this -- (this works on GoBack versions 3.5 & 4)
1) Reboot.
2) As soon as the GoBack splash screen (or banner) appears, press your spacebar.
3) From the GoBack menu, select Disable.
4) Select "Yes", and then "Continue". Your computer should restart, without GoBack active.

To turn GoBack back on, run this same procedure, and enable it again.

If you happen to have the Gateway version of GoBack, the procedure is still pretty much the same. And here's the manual for one of Gateway's versions --- http://support.gateway.com/s/manuals/servers/eseries/8505271.pdf

I can't say that GoBack is one of my favorite programs, especially in the Win9x environment.

If you are experiencing multiple inexplicable problems with the PC, and you don't currently have good backups, it would be a good idea to make some now. Even if the computer will no longer boot, you can still place the hard drive in an external USB 2.0 hard drive enclosure, and use another computer to save the files for you [scan them for malware at that point, too].

Best of luck
. . . Gary

[P.S. ... Welcome to the Tech Support Forums!]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can't do that

"If I hit the spacebar, it just says PLEASE WAIT and I get the same error message."

See my problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OOO but could you explain how I can get my hard drive into an external one, and then how I could put the hard drive back into the internal one after reinstalling windows
 

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TSF Team Emeritus , Microsoft Visiting Expert
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Hi again

A few things to check/try:

Enter your system Bios Setup screens, and see if the time/date are correct, or if they've gone backwards in time to 1980, 1990, or thereabouts (the Ox1 error is sometimes the result of a time setting mismatch). If the time has reset to several years ago, the CMOS battery on the motherboard likely needs replacing.

Replacing a CMOS battery
If you can locate a motherboard manual, or system manual that includes a section concerning the motherboard - you can check that source of information to find out the location and battery type of your CMOS battery. Alternately, you can shut down your computer, power off, and disconnect the power cord. Then ground yourself (touch grounded metal, or wear an antistatic wrist strap), open the case, and look for a coin-type battery: many motherboards use a 3v CR-2032 type of battery [about $1.50 USD]. Most simply have a clip holding the coin battery, by moving either the clip itself or a tiny lever - the battery is easily removed. Be extra careful not to scratch the motherboard, as a damaged "trace" (like a tiny wire along the top of the motherboard) can make the motherboard useless.

Many systems from the Win98/Me era are due to have the batteries lose their charge by now - this is normal. So replace your battery if you've got these symptoms, enter Bios Setup after you've got the new battery in, enter the correct date/time (& look at all the other settings, too - you can refer to your motherboard/system manual for this - to make sure they are OK as well [you can also try "Save Defaults & Exit" if you are uncertain of the correct values = just make sure to enter the correct time/date first! For advanced recommendations on Bios settings, you can always try a look at Adrian's famous Bios Optimization Guide: it has a wealth of helpful information --- http://www.techarp.com/freebog.aspx

Then try a fresh reboot. If the GoBack problem is now OK, you're done (just remember to keep a good backup schedule for the future). If the GoBack problem is still there -- this does sound like you have the Gateway GoBack version (that you found the patch for, but now need a method to install it).

Gateway provides a few different procedures for getting past the "Please Wait" trouble. Most involve "unhooking" GoBack from your active partition's MBR. If your system isn't a Gateway, let me know & I can walk you through a generic procedure. If you system is a Gateway, and the first procedure they describe doesn't work, you'll need to see if you have all the disks you need (especially the System Restoration CD #1) for the other procedures. Let us know if you no longer have those disks, as there are other methods that can be used.

Here's the link to all the suggested procedures from Gateway, it also includes links to download the patch, and detailed step-by-step instructions --- http://support.gateway.com/s/issues/666809910.shtml

But, if your system doesn't have a time/date issue, and you want to try Gateway's first procedure quickly, here it is, direct from Gateway support:
1) Turn on your computer.
2) Press and hold the CTRL+ALT keys simultaneously while tapping the G key right after the computer completes its POST and before the GoBack message appears. Note: Timing is very important, and it may take a few tries.
3) GoBack prompts you to force GoBack to unhook itself from the MBR.
4) To have GoBack unhook itself, press the F key.
5) A message appears, indicating that GoBack successfully unhooked itself, and the computer starts back into Windows.
6) A message may appear, indicating that GoBack is currently disabled and prompting you to re-enable it. Click No.
7) Follow the steps to download and install the 9513025.exe file from the Gateway Web site. This is a patched version of GoBack that does not exhibit this issue.

--- Those patch instructions are fairly detailed, I won't copy them here - but they are available from the Gateway link above --- on that page, go down to the section "Patched GoBack Installation" --- you might want to print those instructions out beforehand.
_________________

You can make backups from a drive that is still healthy enough to spin properly & be read, by placing it in an external USB 2.0 hard drive enclosure [FireWire and external SATA enclosures are growing in popularity, too - but USB 2.0 is the most common]. Such enclosures are not expensive - they start around $15 --- here's an example --- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817155515 --- So long as the "helper computer" is well-protected & has up-to-date security programs installed, you should be then able to 1) scan your problem hard drive for malware & clean as necessary, and 2) copy data you wish to save onto either the host computer's hard drive, or to removeable media (USB flash drives, CD/DVD disks, etc). An XP computer can be used to help any Win9x/Me/Nt/2000/XP disk. A Win9x/Me computer can only help other Win9x/Me computers, or XP computers who have been formatted using the FAT32 file system.

Sorry that this post ended up so long! --> Hope that it leads to a nice, quick, short repair for you.
. . . Gary

[P.S. --- it is best to reinstall Windows only when the hard drive is inside the case of the computer being repaired. Windows will find and install for the wrong hardware if the drive is inside of another computer]
 
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