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My PC has two hard drives. The first hard drive is running Windows XP Professional sp3, and the second hard drive has Ubuntu Linux 7.10 in a dual boot configuration. This means that I have something called Grub which causes a menu to come up so that I can select which of the two OS’s I want to load. The default is Windows XP Professional.

I recently got interested in running Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 and would like to set it up to run Ubuntu Linux. That way (1) I don’t have to worry about dual-booting anymore, and (2) I can gain access to my 160GB second hard drive from within Windows XP.

I did a little research on how to uninstall Ubuntu without harming Windows XP. But the problem I am running into is that there seems to be two ways of doing it:

(1) Go into the Win XP Recovery Console and run FIXMBR after which the Grub boot menu will go away and I can format my second hard drive. Or …
(2) Go into the Win XP Recovery Console and run FIXBOOT, then FIXMBR after which the Grub boot menu will go away and I can format my second hard drive.

So which is it:

FIXMBR only?

Or

FIXBOOT first, then FIXMBR?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

RamFel.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Actually, the advice that I have read is not very specific. Some say to go into Disk Management and delete the Ubuntu partition first, and some say to run FIXBOOT and FIXMBR (or just FIXMBR) first. It’s not specific enough for me. I don’t like taking chances. I would like to hear from someone who’s done it before and has the specific steps written out.

I’ll continue to research, but if anyone out there knows what to do, I’d appreciate hearing from them. And if I figure it out, I’ll perform the procedure on my PC, and if it works, I’ll spell out the steps and post them for those out there that are facing the same situation I am.

RamFel
 

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Boot from the Linux CD - boot into the option that makes no changes to your PC. Then run the Partition Editor and delete Linux. Then boot into the recovery console from the XP CD and run FixBoot, then FixMBR.
 

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Good way of doing it, but I suspect that your way, and my way, produce the same effect. In fact, my way has the benefit of getting rid of Grub first and confirming in my mind that Windows still boots with no errors. I'm still trying to decide. I am backing up my data now and in fact I might try this on a spare PC first. I'll let you know what I decide, and how it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Well, I did it and it works. Here's what I did.

1. I booted the Windowx XP CD.
2. I selected "r" to perform a repair.
3. I selected "1" to perform a repair on Windows XP.
4. My Administrator password is blank, so I hit <Enter>.
5. I typed in the command "fixmbr" and recieved the following warning:

"This computer appears to have a non-standard or invalid master boot record. FIXMBR may damage your partition tables if you proceed. This could cause all the partitions on the current hard disk to become inaccessible. If you are not having problems accessing your drive, do not proceed. Are you sure you want to write a new MBR?"

6. I answered Y for yes.
7. I rebooted.
8. Windows came up just fine (your results may vary -BACK UP YOUR DATA!!!)
9. I created a new partition and formatted my second hard drive.

Thanks for your assistance just the same, Koolfreak. I appreciate your response. Now I have to install Ubuntu on a virtual PC.
 

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Just tossing this in:
Virtual PC (being a Microsoft product) doesn't handle non-Microsoft OSes very well. There are Virtual Machine Additions for Linux (see here), but I don't know how well they work across various distributions. (In case you're wondering what VM additions are, basically they let you integrate the mouse (use single mouse cursor for both your guest and host OS without having to switch by pressing right alt) and in some cases share files via network drives on guest os and shared folder on host os (not sure if it's available on Linux though).
Anyway to get to my point: if it doesn't fare well with microsoft virtual pc, use VirtualBox instead. It has support for a LOT of operating systems, including the linuxes, the bsd's, solaris, and more. http://www.virtualbox.org/
 
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