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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ASUS P6T Motherboard
Pioneer DVR-217 SATA DVDRW OEM
Samsung 500GB 7200rpm SATA II HD502IJ
BenQ G2410HD 24in Widescreen LCD Monitor
Intel Core i7 920
Logitech X-530 5.1 Speaker System
Corsair TR3X6G1333C9 6GB (3x2GB) DDR3
NZXT Zero 2 Case
Antec EarthWatts 650W
Galaxy GeForce GTX 285
I just wanted to check if this was a good build and the parts were compatible, so i didnt get disappointed when i try and put it together.
 

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Everything looks fine, except for the power supply. 650 is a tad lean for the video card, I'd go with a Corsair TX750 at least. Or a PC Power & Cooling 750 Silencer.
 

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Antec's have gone down in quality, and are no longer recommended here. They may have realized the error of their ways, and ret'd to using SeaSonic to make the internals on some of their psu's.

The GTX285 is the top of the food chain for single gpu cards. 650 may have been a lot of power years ago, but no longer. Both the Corsair and the PC P&C have massive single rails, and aren't noisy. Seasonic would also be a good pick. There are others, if you're interested look in the ram and power supply forum for the selection sticky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ASUS P6T Motherboard (1) ($349.00) $349.00
Pioneer DVR-217 SATA DVDRW OEM (1) ($39.00) $39.00
Samsung 500GB 7200rpm SATA II HD502IJ (1) ($89.00) $89.00
BenQ G2410HD 24in Widescreen LCD Monitor (1) ($309.00) $309.00
Intel Core i7 920 (1) ($449.00) $449.00
Logitech X-530 5.1 Speaker System (1) ($109.00) $109.00
Corsair TR3X6G1333C9 6GB (3x2GB) DDR3 (1) ($155.00) $155.00
Gainward GeForce GTX 285 (1) ($539.00) $539.00
Corsair TX-750 750W Power Supply (1) ($219.00) $219.00
NZXT Guardian 921 (1) ($149.00) $149.00
that alright?
 

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I'm just wondering where you're getting the computer parts from? I saw that case you got and I think you should think about getting something better, maybe like this beast here

NZXT TEMPEST Crafted Series CS-NT-TEM-B Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case (Canada - probably closer t the price you'd get it as seeing as your parts are close to what I'd get in Canada)
$124
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146047
 

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Correct, Seasonic is making Antec PSU's.




I would be leary of jumping on the antec band wagon just yet until their stock of delta OEM stuff is depleted from the nooks and crannys of computer seller inventories

and watch the prices, antec has a habit of swaying back and forth from top notch power supplies internals to low tier stuff; after awhile that kind of monitoring is tiresome at best!
 

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tru multi rail is not a seasonic build; seasonic uses a wiring method which "looks" like multi rail but in reality its single rail, I would not want to bother with any unit that is a true multi rail unit in a recent build computer system

a true multi rail requires a very oversized power supply because the amps are dedicated to the rails .....

example......... if you have a 12 volt rail feeding the cpu which is rated for 19 amps and your dual core only uses 7 or 8 amps, then the remaining 11 or 12 watts is reserved for more load on that rail which amounts to 132 watts you wont be able to use

thats one of the big reasons why 450 & 550 watt power supplies dont cut the mustard any more......... they dont have the amps on the video card rails and the other rails are tied up with "reserved" amps which cant be redirected

only high class power supplies like Seasonic / Corsair / PC Power & Cooling and Thermaltake toughpower are using single rail construction
 

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Finally, we are left with what is often some of the most interesting aspects of a power supply (or any PC component) the marketing. Specifically the HX1000W is advertised on the front of the box as having “Solid state capacitors” followed by “Reliable and clean power at 50c” and while those two features do not have to go hand in hand solid capacitors certainly are a better choice when available in the appropriate capacitance and voltage. When we flip over to the backside of the box we find that the advertising for the solid capacitors appears to be restricted to the secondary as that is what is pictured above the bullet point and the primary picture that is included shows a standard electrolytic capacitor from Hitachi (we will see if our review unit comes with Hitachi primaries shortly). The last time we saw a power supply advertised as having solid capacitors it was the Seasonic S12-II 500w and it advertised solid capacitors on just the 12v rails. When we opened the unit found that it actually only had 1 solid capacitor but the advertising was technically true as the unit also only had one 12v rail. Today we will see if Corsair and CWT have used this same approach or if they have stepped up the consumer power supply market and gone with solid capacitors throughout the secondary.
 

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The primary capacitor on this power supply is a Nippon Chemi-con rated at 3300uF and 10v while the secondary capacitors are also all Nippon Chemi-con’s. The fan charged with cooling all three power supplies is a 140mm Yate Loon fan rated at 0.70A at 12v.


high grade Nippon Chemi-con on BOTH primary and secondary spells high quality construction

many use good caps on primary caps and bargain caps on the secondary side
 

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Thanks for the info, So I think the rails are separate but they of excellent build quilty so its a unit to use for sure and if I was only using one good graphics card I would make sure the load is split between the two rails.
 
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