Tech Support banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all, I'm looking for a little help getting started in MS Word. But first I have;

Windows XP Pro, SP2 and my word processing is MS Works version 6.0, MS Works 2001 Setup Launcher, MS Word 2000 SR-1. (What's the SR-1 mean?)

The last time I wrote a novel was some years back and I used an electronic typewriter; an Olivetti I remember. This time around my publisher told me I not only have to use a word processor but what kind. He then gave me a very long list of settings, fonts and a dozen other instructions that assume a proficiency with MS Word. I've had Word for some time but never really used it much; some correspondence etc and I was not good with it. I do understand some of the instruction but there are a few items I can see I need help with. Let me begin with tabs/paragraph indents.

My tab is set at a .5" default and this would suggest to me a half-inch tab. It's not. It is 6 letters deep, or 5/8-inch. Assume this setting to be acceptable, within his parameters; I am told to use, "Tab" to indent single lines. Fine.

Paragraphs seem to be a different beast. I am told to indent that first line by a half-inch and the instructions are quite precise. My copy goes straight from my computer to him, electronically, and from there on to be published. (editing is to be done my end unless I care to pay his staff considerably more). Two questions;

1. Is there a separate setting I need to fine-tune for this particular manuscript and will it stay that way?

2. I have been writing in Word and noticed when I create a paragraph, (hardbreak), it will create its own indent for the next paragraph. It does not always do this, how can I encourage this behavior?

If I can get to the bottom of the tab/paragraph indent mystery I will have one very large obstruction removed. Thanks in advance foe any easily-understood advice.

- Blink :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Glaswegian, I'll go right through that, it looks like it will have a lot of things I need.

- Blink
 

·
Vetustior Humo
Joined
·
11,129 Posts
The first listing is for the Normal.dot file. That's one you'll want to read. It's where Word stores the basic structure for you. Look HERE for another source of information on Word. There a plenty of others - I googled "MS Word help" and got 91,000,000 hits. :grin:

But my real reason for responding is to ask, what's the publisher's cut? And how do I apply? What does your publisher do if they don't format or edit or help anywhere on the front end? Do they even make suggestions for improvements? Once the masterpiece is in final form isn't the hard work mostly done? This is not my profession but it seems strange to me that they don't want to help make it better before the spend any money on bad cover art.
 

·
TSF Team Emeritus, Design Team
Joined
·
2,274 Posts
Blink, I suggest you buy your publisher a copy of The Chicago Manual of Style v.15 (or just use it as a blunt assault weapon in their office) and have them read the section on The Manuscript Editor's Responsibilities. Then, have a look at the section on The Author's Responsibilities so that you know what should be expected of you, and what shouldn't.
Translation of my rant:
I'd look around for a more author-friendly publisher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hi there yustr and SixShooter.

This is the world of self-publishing; sometimes this can mean the difference between being published, or writing for our own amusement. I want to give them a try to see how it goes for me. If you will look through their website, http://www.iuniverse.com/ you will not only see how they do business, the payment details and marketing plans but you will discover a number of famous names you recognize who may have never gotten started had they not tried this too.

I think too it is good for me to be forced to learn about Word, a little knowledge never hurt anyone and it will stand by me well in the future. I had just begun looking for information on the internet and was finding things like "How to do bold and italics fast", that kind of thing, when I came across you guys quite by chance, following links. I'm glad I did. Thanks for that new link yustr, I only had a little time last night to look in at the other before we were swamped by kindly visitors meaning well. My wife took my shotgun away from me and made me sit down. :grin:

I can easily see I will find the information I need in those links and I will be able to get my research notes into some kind of order. Please don't be too hard on the publisher, I think it is a good thing he does. Nicht wahr?

-Blink :smile:
 

·
TSF Team Emeritus, Design Team
Joined
·
2,274 Posts
Blink, I wasn't trying to be harsh, I'm just trying to figure out what that company actually does. Here's my dilemma. Nothing short of ephemera should be published out of Microsoft Word. Therefore, when the material is published, the text is (or should be) transfered out of Word to a page-layout program. Therefore, any formatting done in Word would be lost, and all of the hard work you've done to abide by their rules is senseless.
Here's a one page spread of what I'd be looking at in InDesign before a book goes to print. (This is before printer spreads are set up, which makes pagination possible.) Any formatting in Microsoft Word would most likely either be lost or have to be undone when transfered to a layout program.... I'm just all sorts of confused :dead:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
SixShooter said:
Blink, I wasn't trying to be harsh, I'm just trying to figure out what that company actually does. Here's my dilemma. Nothing short of ephemera should be published out of Microsoft Word. Therefore, when the material is published, the text is (or should be) transfered out of Word to a page-layout program. Therefore, any formatting done in Word would be lost, and all of the hard work you've done to abide by their rules is senseless.
Not harsh SixShooter, I simply thought you were unaware of their process. I don't understand how they do it but they do ask for an exact font face and size and that the chapters must follow each other etc. I had asked them if I could make each chapter "stand-alone", as I want to print out each copy as I write them. This is for keeping, and because I want to send copies of the manuscript overseas. They said no, so I looked around and found I can save a master copy to a USB Flash Drive, something else I had to lean about last week. I can format that any way I want. I wanted too, each chapter to begin on a new page but was told no. It seems to me my copy will be fed into a process that will do all the formatting, but it is rigid in what it can accept, much like scanners.

Here's a one page spread of what I'd be looking at in InDesign before a book goes to print. (This is before printer spreads are set up, which makes pagination possible.) Any formatting in Microsoft Word would most likely either be lost or have to be undone when transfered to a layout program.... I'm just all sorts of confused :dead:
I too wondered about the pagination. I know my Word page numbers cannot match those of the finished product so I assume their process will disregard mine and create their own.

[-Blink] :smile:
 

·
Vetustior Humo
Joined
·
11,129 Posts
Once it's published can I get a signed copy. :sayyes:

Oh by the way, what's it about... :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
The view from the typesetter...

Greetings, folks. I'm a typesetter/graphic designer, so I can answer some of the questions about why things have to be formatted just so in Microsoft Word -- it's what one person already touched on: Your formatting will be (possibly) lost when the text is imported into a page layout program. Hence, you must use tabs (not the auto indent); do not auto-bullet; do not auto-number; and so forth. Avoid Word's auto functions like the plague they are. Some of us have managed to master importing text from Wretched Word well enough to save things like bold and italic. It's not much fun.

I've been a typesetter for 20 years. I've used page layout programs like QuarkXpress for 15 of those years. Never, ever, have I been able to import anything directly from Word without it getting funkified. If your publisher has given you strict formatting instructions, follow them. There's a reason. Trust me. Some unknown typesetter will thank you. :wink:

Cheers,
Sarah
 

·
TSF Team Emeritus, Design Team
Joined
·
2,274 Posts
Sarah, it's nice to see a typesetter around here. My work leans more towards web design, but I work in print also, and do some occassional typesetting (I use InDesign though, never really spent much time on Quark). Anyway, I've got alot of respect for what you do and hope to see you around here. Feel free to drop by the Graphic Design forum – it's fairly new so there isn't much activity yet, but hopefully it will pick up.
–Six
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top