Tech Support Forum banner
21 - 36 of 36 Posts

· Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
33,780 Posts
As Dave mentioned earlier, maybe Bill Bright will take a look at this thread. He's good at this kind of thing.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
You might want to consider investigating the quality of the ground at the outlet the washing machine is connected to... grounding has been through some SILLY iterations over decades... like using copper water pipes or sheet-metal forced-air heating/cooling ducts as grounds. And even if there is a copper grounding rod buried 10 feet in the ground, if it is very old (more than 30 years old), it can be mostly dissolved. The proper fix would be to have a new ground rod installed and a new grounding bond established. The only problem with testing a ground is that you need a known-good ground for a reference. Another possible trouble point can be any wire splices between your washing machine outlet and the fuse box/circuit breaker box. If those wire splices are "friction" splices with crimped connections or wire nuts, remove whatever is holding the wires together, solder the correct wires together and insulate the solder joints carefully. Over time, this type of electrical connection can become oxidized or the screw-thread pressure holding the spliced wires together can become loose or oxidized (or both). I would also recommend checking the washing machine outlet... if the electrical wires are held on with screw terminals, make sure all of them are tight... heating and cooling from 1000s of washing machine cycles over decades can cause friction connections like screw terminals to loosen. You can then also have the fuse-box/circuit breaker panel examined to be certain all of those screw-down terminals are all still tight and "fresh" (so they conduct easily). Finally, there is probably a main circuit breaker on or in your home that is separate from the fuse box/circuit breaker panel. Find it. Disable power supplied to it, then make sure the screws on the terminals in that main circuit breaker are all tight. Our 1969 home (USA) had the electrical ground connected to the copper pipe that connected the house to the fresh water service under the street. In 2014, we dug up that copper water line to examine it for corrosion... the copper was so thin, it was super-easy to bend the copper with a finger or two. Pin-holes were developing in the pipe. This was bare copper pipe buried 43 years earlier and it probably should have been replaced 5 or 10 years ago. The replacement pipe was coated with plastic to prevent corrosion with dirt and moisture to stop the corrosion more permanently. I once had an electrical problem caused by the wire in the walls of the house coming into contact with ONE stray nail inside the wall. Over decades, the nail pierced the insulation and made a high-resistance path to ground on the "hot" side of the wiring to a bathroom. It produced odd problems until the nail was found and the wire was protected.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Poor programming for BOTH problems?
Define unusable? I ran into one that had the lid switch disconnected. It would run one load through and then refuse to run. If you unplugged it for 30 seconds, it would run one more load and then stop. Fixing the lid switch solved the problem.
johnwill, Yours seems another weird one too...that doesn't make sense from a safety standpoint. These days I would think the default for a broken switch disables the motor immediately and wouldn't even let one start a load never mind finish a load. The thing's processor should be testing the lid switch every time it's used.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Try flicking the breaker off & on a few times...
When it isn't working, can you use your meter to find out where the power stops along the chain from your plug to the circuit board? Remember that having voltage present does not mean you have the current available to run the machine (bad connection somewhere between power box & m/c)...
Have you tried running an extension cord to a different room (on a different breaker)???
 

· Global Moderator
Electronic Design
Joined
·
52,615 Posts
Poor programming for BOTH problems?

johnwill, Yours seems another weird one too...that doesn't make sense from a safety standpoint. These days I would think the default for a broken switch disables the motor immediately and wouldn't even let one start a load never mind finish a load. The thing's processor should be testing the lid switch every time it's used.
You know that and I know that, that's why it was so confusing! My only guess was that they didn't test the switch the first operation after a complete power cycle.
 

· Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
33,780 Posts
Try flicking the breaker off & on a few times...
When it isn't working, can you use your meter to find out where the power stops along the chain from your plug to the circuit board? Remember that having voltage present does not mean you have the current available to run the machine (bad connection somewhere between power box & m/c)...
Have you tried running an extension cord to a different room (on a different breaker)???
If you read the original post you'd see the OP has a fuse box, no breaker switches.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Assuming that the operator does not engage in ESD procedures, it would appear that the handling of the fuse would introduce exterior capacitance to the system, which would either drain or add capacitance to the control circuit and thus allow the system to recover. I live in an area with poor radio reception, and the position of my body in relation to the antenna makes radio reception possible; possibly the same effect is what is occurring here. Being a physicist myself, I am aware of the myriad fields involved so it is logical not to be on top in every field. This is not a solution to the problem but an explanation as to the nature of the problem.
 

· Manager, TSF Articles
Joined
·
38,787 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Assuming that the operator does not engage in ESD procedures, it would appear that the handling of the fuse would introduce exterior capacitance to the system, which would either drain or add capacitance to the control circuit and thus allow the system to recover. I live in an area with poor radio reception, and the position of my body in relation to the antenna makes radio reception possible; possibly the same effect is what is occurring here. Being a physicist myself, I am aware of the myriad fields involved so it is logical not to be on top in every field. This is not a solution to the problem but an explanation as to the nature of the problem.
Thanks. That's a possible explanation.
 

· Manager, TSF Articles
Joined
·
38,787 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Thanks. That's a possible explanation.
Assuming that the operator does not engage in ESD procedures, it would appear that the handling of the fuse would introduce exterior capacitance to the system, which would either drain or add capacitance to the control circuit and thus allow the system to recover. I live in an area with poor radio reception, and the position of my body in relation to the antenna makes radio reception possible; possibly the same effect is what is occurring here. Being a physicist myself, I am aware of the myriad fields involved so it is logical not to be on top in every field. This is not a solution to the problem but an explanation as to the nature of the problem.
I tried discharging any residual charge there may be across the plug pins but no difference. It seems that the fuse has to be physically removed and replaced. However, the machine has now started making dreadful noises so I suspect the main bearing is packing up. Perhaps it's time I invested in a new machine.
 

· TSF Moderator , Hardware Team , Networking Team
Joined
·
11,903 Posts
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top